Bio


I work on omics and digital health related projects at Stanford

Projects


All Publications


  • (ReBOOT) REmote moBile Outpatient MOnitoring in heart Transplant: A pilot study. The Canadian journal of cardiology Moayedi, Y., Hershman, S. G., Henricksen, E. J., Lee, R., Han, J., Bougouin, W., Khush, K. K., Ross, H. J., Teuteberg, J. J. 2020

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.cjca.2020.07.005

    View details for PubMedID 32681856

  • Molecular Transducers of Physical Activity Consortium (MoTrPAC): Mapping the Dynamic Responses to Exercise. Cell Sanford, J. A., Nogiec, C. D., Lindholm, M. E., Adkins, J. N., Amar, D., Dasari, S., Drugan, J. K., Fernandez, F. M., Radom-Aizik, S., Schenk, S., Snyder, M. P., Tracy, R. P., Vanderboom, P., Trappe, S., Walsh, M. J., Molecular Transducers of Physical Activity Consortium, Adkins, J. N., Amar, D., Dasari, S., Drugan, J. K., Evans, C. R., Fernandez, F. M., Li, Y., Lindholm, M. E., Nogiec, C. D., Radom-Aizik, S., Sanford, J. A., Schenk, S., Snyder, M. P., Tomlinson, L., Tracy, R. P., Trappe, S., Vanderboom, P., Walsh, M. J., Alekel, D. L., Bekirov, I., Boyce, A. T., Boyington, J., Fleg, J. L., Joseph, L. J., Laughlin, M. R., Maruvada, P., Morris, S. A., McGowan, J. A., Nierras, C., Pai, V., Peterson, C., Ramos, E., Roary, M. C., Williams, J. P., Xia, A., Cornell, E., Rooney, J., Miller, M. E., Ambrosius, W. T., Rushing, S., Stowe, C. L., Rejeski, W. J., Nicklas, B. J., Pahor, M., Lu, C., Trappe, T., Chambers, T., Raue, U., Lester, B., Bergman, B. C., Bessesen, D. H., Jankowski, C. M., Kohrt, W. M., Melanson, E. L., Moreau, K. L., Schauer, I. E., Schwartz, R. S., Kraus, W. E., Slentz, C. A., Huffman, K. M., Johnson, J. L., Willis, L. H., Kelly, L., Houmard, J. A., Dubis, G., Broskey, N., Goodpaster, B. H., Sparks, L. M., Coen, P. M., Cooper, D. M., Haddad, F., Rankinen, T., Ravussin, E., Johannsen, N., Harris, M., Jakicic, J. M., Newman, A. B., Forman, D. D., Kershaw, E., Rogers, R. J., Nindl, B. C., Page, L. C., Stefanovic-Racic, M., Barr, S. L., Rasmussen, B. B., Moro, T., Paddon-Jones, D., Volpi, E., Spratt, H., Musi, N., Espinoza, S., Patel, D., Serra, M., Gelfond, J., Burns, A., Bamman, M. M., Buford, T. W., Cutter, G. R., Bodine, S. C., Esser, K., Farrar, R. P., Goodyear, L. J., Hirshman, M. F., Albertson, B. G., Qian, W., Piehowski, P., Gritsenko, M. A., Monore, M. E., Petyuk, V. A., McDermott, J. E., Hansen, J. N., Hutchison, C., Moore, S., Gaul, D. A., Clish, C. B., Avila-Pacheco, J., Dennis, C., Kellis, M., Carr, S., Jean-Beltran, P. M., Keshishian, H., Mani, D. R., Clauser, K., Krug, K., Mundorff, C., Pearce, C., Ivanova, A. A., Ortlund, E. A., Maner-Smith, K., Uppal, K., Zhang, T., Sealfon, S. C., Zavlasky, E., Nair, V., Li, S., Jain, N., Ge, Y., Sun, Y., Nudelman, G., Ruf-Zamojski, F., Smith, G., Pincas, N., Rubenstein, A., Amper, M. A., Seenarine, N., Lappalainen, T., Lanza, I. R., Nair, K. S., Klaus, K., Montgomery, S. B., Smith, K. S., Gay, N. R., Zhao, B., Hung, C. J., Zebarjadi, N., Balliu, B., Fresard, L., Burant, C. F., Li, J. Z., Kachman, M., Soni, T., Raskind, A. B., Gerszten, R., Robbins, J., Ilkayeva, O., Muehlbauer, M. J., Newgard, C. B., Ashley, E. A., Wheeler, M. T., Jimenez-Morales, D., Raja, A., Dalton, K. P., Zhen, J., Kim, Y. S., Christle, J. W., Marwaha, S., Chin, E. T., Hershman, S. G., Hastie, T., Tibshirani, R., Rivas, M. A. 2020; 181 (7): 1464–74

    Abstract

    Exercise provides a robust physiological stimulus that evokes cross-talk among multiple tissues that when repeated regularly (i.e., training) improves physiological capacity, benefits numerous organ systems, and decreases the risk for premature mortality. However, a gap remains in identifying the detailed molecular signals induced by exercise that benefits health and prevents disease. The Molecular Transducers of Physical Activity Consortium (MoTrPAC) was established to address this gap and generate a molecular map of exercise. Preclinical and clinical studies will examine the systemic effects of endurance and resistance exercise across a range of ages and fitness levels by molecular probing of multiple tissues before and after acute and chronic exercise. From this multi-omic and bioinformatic analysis, a molecular map of exercise will be established. Altogether, MoTrPAC will provide a public database that is expected to enhance our understanding of the health benefits of exercise and to provide insight into how physical activity mitigates disease.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.cell.2020.06.004

    View details for PubMedID 32589957

  • Physical activity, sleep and cardiovascular health data for 50,000 individuals from the MyHeart Counts Study. Scientific data Hershman, S. G., Bot, B. M., Shcherbina, A., Doerr, M., Moayedi, Y., Pavlovic, A., Waggott, D., Cho, M. K., Rosenberger, M. E., Haskell, W. L., Myers, J., Champagne, M. A., Mignot, E., Salvi, D., Landray, M., Tarassenko, L., Harrington, R. A., Yeung, A. C., McConnell, M. V., Ashley, E. A. 2019; 6 (1): 24

    Abstract

    Studies have established the importance of physical activity and fitness for long-term cardiovascular health, yet limited data exist on the association between objective, real-world large-scale physical activity patterns, fitness, sleep, and cardiovascular health primarily due to difficulties in collecting such datasets. We present data from the MyHeart Counts Cardiovascular Health Study, wherein participants contributed data via an iPhone application built using Apple's ResearchKit framework and consented to make this data available freely for further research applications. In this smartphone-based study of cardiovascular health, participants recorded daily physical activity, completed health questionnaires, and performed a 6-minute walk fitness test. Data from English-speaking participants aged 18 years or older with a US-registered iPhone who agreed to share their data broadly and who enrolled between the study's launch and the time of the data freeze for this data release (March 10 2015-October 28 2015) are now available for further research. It is anticipated that releasing this large-scale collection of real-world physical activity, fitness, sleep, and cardiovascular health data will enable the research community to work collaboratively towards improving our understanding of the relationship between cardiovascular indicators, lifestyle, and overall health, as well as inform mobile health research best practices.

    View details for PubMedID 30975992

  • Physical activity, sleep and cardiovascular health data for 50,000 individuals from the MyHeart Counts Study SCIENTIFIC DATA Hershman, S. G., Bot, B. M., Shcherbina, A., Doerr, M., Moayedi, Y., Pavlovic, A., Waggott, D., Cho, M. K., Rosenberger, M. E., Haskell, W. L., Myers, J., Champagne, M., Mignot, E., Salvi, D., Landray, M., Tarassenko, L., Harrington, R. A., Yeung, A. C., McConnell, M. V., Ashley, E. A. 2019; 6
  • The effect of digital physical activity interventions on daily step count: a randomised controlled crossover substudy of the MyHeart Counts Cardiovascular Health Study. The Lancet. Digital health Shcherbina, A., Hershman, S. G., Lazzeroni, L., King, A. C., O'Sullivan, J. W., Hekler, E., Moayedi, Y., Pavlovic, A., Waggott, D., Sharma, A., Yeung, A., Christle, J. W., Wheeler, M. T., McConnell, M. V., Harrington, R. A., Ashley, E. A. 2019; 1 (7): e344–e352

    Abstract

    Smartphone apps might enable interventions to increase physical activity, but few randomised trials testing this hypothesis have been done. The MyHeart Counts Cardiovascular Health Study is a longitudinal smartphone-based study with the aim of elucidating the determinants of cardiovascular health. We aimed to investigate the effect of four different physical activity coaching interventions on daily step count in a substudy of the MyHeart Counts Study.In this randomised, controlled crossover trial, we recruited adults (aged ≥18 years) in the USA with access to an iPhone smartphone (Apple, Cupertino, CA, USA; version 5S or newer) who had downloaded the MyHeart Counts app (version 2.0). After completion of a 1 week baseline period of interaction with the MyHeart Counts app, participants were randomly assigned to receive one of 24 permutations (four combinations of four 7 day interventions) in a crossover design using a random number generator built into the app. Interventions consisted of either daily prompts to complete 10 000 steps, hourly prompts to stand following 1 h of sitting, instructions to read the guidelines from the American Heart Association website, or e-coaching based upon the individual's personal activity patterns from the baseline week of data collection. Participants completed the trial in a free-living setting. Due to the nature of the interventions, participants could not be masked from the intervention. Investigators were not masked to intervention allocation. The primary outcome was change in mean daily step count from baseline for each of the four interventions, assessed in the modified intention-to-treat analysis set, which included all participants who had completed 7 days of baseline monitoring and at least 1 day of one of the four interventions. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT03090321.Between Dec 12, 2016, and June 6, 2018, 2783 participants consented to enrol in the coaching study, of whom 1075 completed 7 days of baseline monitoring and at least 1 day of one of the four interventions and thus were included in the modified intention-to-treat analysis set. 493 individuals completed the full set of assigned interventions. All four interventions significantly increased mean daily step count from baseline (mean daily step count 2914 [SE 74]): mean step count increased by 319 steps (75) for participants in the American Heart Association website prompt group (p<0·0001), 267 steps (74) for participants in the hourly stand prompt group (p=0·0003), 254 steps (74) for participants in the cluster-specific prompts group (p=0·0006), and by 226 steps (75) for participants in the 10 000 daily step prompt group (p=0·0026 vs baseline).Four smartphone-based physical activity coaching interventions significantly increased daily physical activity. These findings suggests that digital interventions delivered via a mobile app have the ability to increase short-term physical activity levels in a free-living cohort.Stanford Data Science Initiative.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/S2589-7500(19)30129-3

    View details for PubMedID 33323209

  • Perceived Generational, Geographic, and Sex-Based Differences in Choosing a Career in Advanced Heart Failure. Circulation. Heart failure Moayedi, Y., Hershman, S. G., Ross, H. J., Khush, K. K., Teuteberg, J. J. 2019; 12 (7): e005754
  • The Myheart Counts Cardiovascular Health Study: A Randomized Controlled Trial of Digital Health Coaching for Physical Activity Promotion Shcherbina, A., Hershman, S., King, A. C., Hekler, E., Pavlovic, A., Waggott, D., McConnell, M. V., Ashley, E. A., Harrington, R. A. LIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS & WILKINS. 2018: E767
  • Data Descriptor: The asthma mobile health study, smartphone data collected using ResearchKit SCIENTIFIC DATA Chan, Y., Bot, B. M., Zweig, M., Tignor, N., Ma, W., Suver, C., Cedeno, R., Scott, E. R., Hershman, S., Schadt, E. E., Wang, P. 2018; 5: 180096

    Abstract

    Widespread adoption of smart mobile platforms coupled with a growing ecosystem of sensors including passive location tracking and the ability to leverage external data sources create an opportunity to generate an unprecedented depth of data on individuals. Mobile health technologies could be utilized for chronic disease management as well as research to advance our understanding of common diseases, such as asthma. We conducted a prospective observational asthma study to assess the feasibility of this type of approach, clinical characteristics of cohorts recruited via a mobile platform, the validity of data collected, user retention patterns, and user data sharing preferences. We describe data and descriptive statistics from the Asthma Mobile Health Study, whereby participants engaged with an iPhone application built using Apple's ResearchKit framework. Data from 6346 U.S. participants, who agreed to share their data broadly, have been made available for further research. These resources have the potential to enable the research community to work collaboratively towards improving our understanding of asthma as well as mobile health research best practices.

    View details for PubMedID 29786695

  • Big data, artificial intelligence, and cardiovascular precision medicine EXPERT REVIEW OF PRECISION MEDICINE AND DRUG DEVELOPMENT Krittanawong, C., Johnson, K. W., Hershman, S. G., Tang, W. 2018; 3 (5): 305–17