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  • Anticipatory human subthalamic area beta-band power responses to dissociable tastes correlate with weight gain. Neurobiology of disease Kakusa, B., Huang, Y., Barbosa, D. A., Feng, A., Gattas, S., Shivacharan, R., Lee, E. B., Kuijper, F. M., Saluja, S., Parker, J. J., Miller, K. J., Keller, C., Bohon, C., Halpern, C. H. 2021: 105348

    Abstract

    The availability of enticing sweet, fatty tastes is prevalent in the modern diet and contribute to overeating and obesity. In animal models, the subthalamic area plays a role in mediating appetitive and consummatory feeding behaviors, however, its role in human feeding is unknown. We used intraoperative, subthalamic field potential recordings while participants (n = 5) engaged in a task designed to provoke responses of taste anticipation and receipt. Decreased subthalamic beta-band (15-30 Hz) power responses were observed for both sweet-fat and neutral tastes. Anticipatory responses to taste-neutral cues started with an immediate decrease in beta-band power from baseline followed by an early beta-band rebound above baseline. On the contrary, anticipatory responses to sweet-fat were characterized by a greater and sustained decrease in beta-band power. These activity patterns were topographically specific to the subthalamic nucleus and substantia nigra. Further, a neural network trained on this beta-band power signal accurately predicted (AUC ≥ 74%) single trials corresponding to either taste. Finally, the magnitude of the beta-band rebound for a neutral taste was associated with increased body mass index after starting deep brain stimulation therapy. We provide preliminary evidence of discriminatory taste encoding within the subthalamic area associated with control mechanisms that mediate appetitive and consummatory behaviors.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.nbd.2021.105348

    View details for PubMedID 33781923