All Publications


  • Immune modulation resulting from MR-guided high intensity focused ultrasound in a model of murine breast cancer. Scientific reports Fite, B. Z., Wang, J., Kare, A. J., Ilovitsh, A., Chavez, M., Ilovitsh, T., Zhang, N., Chen, W., Robinson, E., Zhang, H., Kheirolomoom, A., Silvestrini, M. T., Ingham, E. S., Mahakian, L. M., Tam, S. M., Davis, R. R., Tepper, C. G., Borowsky, A. D., Ferrara, K. W. 2021; 11 (1): 927

    Abstract

    High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) rapidly and non-invasively destroys tumor tissue. Here, we sought to assess the immunomodulatory effects of MR-guided HIFU and its combination with the innate immune agonist CpG and checkpoint inhibitor anti-PD-1. Mice with multi-focal breast cancer underwent ablation with a parameter set designed to achieve mechanical disruption with minimal thermal dose or a protocol in which tumor temperature reached 65°C. Mice received either HIFU alone or were primed with the toll-like receptor 9 agonist CpG and the checkpoint modulator anti-PD-1. Both mechanical HIFU and thermal ablation induced a potent inflammatory response with increased expression of Nlrp3, Jun, Mefv, Il6 and Il1beta and alterations in macrophage polarization compared to control. Furthermore, HIFU upregulated multiple innate immune receptors and immune pathways, including Nod1, Nlrp3, Aim2, Ctsb, Tlr1/2/4/7/8/9, Oas2, and RhoA. The inflammatory response was largely sterile and consistent with wound-healing. Priming with CpG attenuated Il6 and Nlrp3 expression, further upregulated expression of Nod2, Oas2, RhoA, Pycard, Tlr1/2 and Il12, and enhanced T-cell number and activation while polarizing macrophages to an anti-tumor phenotype. The tumor-specific antigen, cytokines and cell debris liberated by HIFU enhance response to innate immune agonists.

    View details for DOI 10.1038/s41598-020-80135-1

    View details for PubMedID 33441763

  • Systemic Immunotherapy with Micellar Resiquimod-Polymer Conjugates Triggers a Robust Antitumor Response in a Breast Cancer Model. Advanced healthcare materials Kakwere, H. n., Zhang, H. n., Ingham, E. S., Nura-Raie, M. n., Tumbale, S. K., Allen, R. n., Tam, S. M., Wu, B. n., Liu, C. n., Kheirolomoom, A. n., Fite, B. Z., Ilovitsh, A. n., Lewis, J. S., Ferrara, K. W. 2021: e2100008

    Abstract

    Resiquimod is an immunopotent toll-like receptor 7/8 agonist with antitumor activity. Despite being potent against skin cancers, it is poorly tolerated systemically due to toxicity. Integrating resiquimod into nanoparticles presents an avenue to circumvent the toxicity problem. Herein, the preparation of degradable nanoparticles with covalently bound resiquimod and their systemic application in cancer immunotherapy is reported. Dispersion in water of amphiphilic constructs integrating resiquimod covalently bound via degradable amide or ester linkages yields immune-activating nanoparticles. The degradable agonist-nanoparticle bonds allow the release of resiquimod from the carrier nanoparticles. In vitro assays with antigen presenting cells demonstrate that the nanoparticles retain the immunostimulatory activity of resiquimod. Systemic administration of the nanoparticles and checkpoint blockade (aPD-1) to a breast cancer mouse model with multiple established tumors triggers antitumor activity evidenced by suppressed tumor growth and enhanced CD8+ T-cell infiltration. Nanoparticles with ester links, which hydrolyze more readily, yield a stronger immune response with 75% of tumors eliminated when combined with aPD-1. The reduced tumor growth and the presence of activated CD8+ T-cells across multiple tumors suggest the potential for treating metastatic cancer.

    View details for DOI 10.1002/adhm.202100008

    View details for PubMedID 33646600

  • Minicircles for a two-step blood biomarker and PET imaging early cancer detection strategy. Journal of controlled release : official journal of the Controlled Release Society Robinson, E. R., Gowrishankar, G., D'Souza, A., Kheirolomoom, A., Haywood, T., Hori, S. S., Chuang, H. Y., Zeng, Y., Tumbale, S., Aalipour, A., Beinat, C., Alam, I. S., Sathirachinda, A., Kanada, M., Paulmurugan, R., Ferrara, K. W., Gambhir, S. S. 2021

    Abstract

    Early cancer detection can dramatically increase treatment options and survival rates for patients, yet detection of early-stage tumors remains difficult. Here, we demonstrate a two-step strategy to detect and locate cancerous lesions by delivering tumor-activatable minicircle (MC) plasmids encoding a combination of blood-based and imaging reporter genes to tumor cells. We genetically engineered the MCs, under the control of the pan-tumor-specific Survivin promoter, to encode: 1) Gaussia Luciferase (GLuc), a secreted biomarker that can be easily assayed in blood samples; and 2) Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Thymidine Kinase mutant (HSV-1 sr39TK), a PET reporter gene that can be used for highly sensitive and quantitative imaging of the tumor location. We evaluated two methods of MC delivery, complexing the MCs with the chemical transfection agent jetPEI or encapsulating the MCs in extracellular vesicles (EVs) derived from a human cervical cancer HeLa cell line. MCs delivered by EVs or jetPEI yielded significant expression of the reporter genes in cell culture versus MCs delivered without a transfection agent. Secreted GLuc correlated with HSV-1 sr39TK expression with R2 = 0.9676. MC complexation with jetPEI delivered a larger mass of MC for enhanced transfection, which was crucial for in vivo animal studies, where delivery of MCs via jetPEI resulted in GLuc and HSV-1 sr39TK expression at significantly higher levels than controls. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of the PET reporter gene HSV-1 sr39TK delivered via a tumor-activatable MC to tumor cells for an early cancer detection strategy. This work explores solutions to endogenous blood-based biomarker and molecular imaging limitations of early cancer detection strategies and elucidates the delivery capabilities and limitations of EVs.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.jconrel.2021.05.026

    View details for PubMedID 34029631

  • Development of thermosensitive resiquimod-loaded liposomes for enhanced cancer immunotherapy. Journal of controlled release : official journal of the Controlled Release Society Zhang, H., Tang, W., Kheirolomoom, A., Fite, B. Z., Wu, B., Lau, K., Baikoghli, M., Raie, M. N., Tumbale, S. K., Foiret, J., Ingham, E. S., Mahakian, L. M., Tam, S. M., Cheng, R. H., Borowsky, A. D., Ferrara, K. W. 2020

    Abstract

    Resiquimod (R848) is a toll-like receptor 7 and 8 (TLR7/8) agonist with potent antitumor and immunostimulatory activity. However, systemic delivery of R848 is poorly tolerated because of its poor solubility in water and systemic immune activation. In order to address these limitations, we developed an intravenously-injectable formulation with R848 using thermosensitive liposomes (TSLs) as a delivery vehicle. R848 was remotely loaded into TSLs composed of DPPC: DSPC: DSPE-PEG2K (85:10:5, mol%) with 100 mM FeSO4 as the trapping agent inside. The final R848 to lipid ratio of the optimized R848-loaded TSLs (R848-TSLs) was 0.09 (w/w), 10-fold higher than the previously-reported values. R848-TSL released 80% of R848 within 5 min at 42 °C. These TSLs were then combined with alphaPD-1, an immune checkpoint inhibitor, and ultrasound-mediated hyperthermia in a neu deletion (NDL) mouse mammary carcinoma model (Her2+, ER/PR negative). Combined with alphaPD-1, local injection of R848-TSLs showed superior efficacy with complete NDL tumor regression in both treated and abscopal sites achieved in 8 of 11 tumor bearing mice over 100 days. Immunohistochemistry confirmed enhanced CD8+ T cell infiltration and accumulation by R848-TSLs. Systemic delivery of R848-TSLs, combined with local hyperthermia and alphaPD-1, inhibited tumor growth and extended median survival from 28 days (no-treatment control) to 94 days. Upon re-challenge with reinjection of tumor cells, none of the previously cured mice developed tumors, as compared with 100% of age-matched control mice. The dose of R848 (10 mug for intra-tumoral injection or 6 mg/kg for intravenous injection delivered up to 4 times) was well-tolerated without weight loss or organ hypertrophy. In summary, we developed R848-TSLs that can be administered locally or systematically, resulting in tumor regression and enhanced survival when combined with alphaPD-1 in mouse models of breast cancer.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.jconrel.2020.11.013

    View details for PubMedID 33189786

  • Low-frequency ultrasound-mediated cytokine transfection enhances T cell recruitment at local and distant tumor sites. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America Ilovitsh, T. n., Feng, Y. n., Foiret, J. n., Kheirolomoom, A. n., Zhang, H. n., Ingham, E. S., Ilovitsh, A. n., Tumbale, S. K., Fite, B. Z., Wu, B. n., Raie, M. N., Zhang, N. n., Kare, A. J., Chavez, M. n., Qi, L. S., Pelled, G. n., Gazit, D. n., Vermesh, O. n., Steinberg, I. n., Gambhir, S. S., Ferrara, K. W. 2020

    Abstract

    Robust cytotoxic T cell infiltration has proven to be difficult to achieve in solid tumors. We set out to develop a flexible protocol to efficiently transfect tumor and stromal cells to produce immune-activating cytokines, and thus enhance T cell infiltration while debulking tumor mass. By combining ultrasound with tumor-targeted microbubbles, membrane pores are created and facilitate a controllable and local transfection. Here, we applied a substantially lower transmission frequency (250 kHz) than applied previously. The resulting microbubble oscillation was significantly enhanced, reaching an effective expansion ratio of 35 for a peak negative pressure of 500 kPa in vitro. Combining low-frequency ultrasound with tumor-targeted microbubbles and a DNA plasmid construct, 20% of tumor cells remained viable, and ∼20% of these remaining cells were transfected with a reporter gene both in vitro and in vivo. The majority of cells transfected in vivo were mucin 1+/CD45- tumor cells. Tumor and stromal cells were then transfected with plasmid DNA encoding IFN-β, producing 150 pg/106 cells in vitro, a 150-fold increase compared to no-ultrasound or no-plasmid controls and a 50-fold increase compared to treatment with targeted microbubbles and ultrasound (without IFN-β). This enhancement in secretion exceeds previously reported fourfold to fivefold increases with other in vitro treatments. Combined with intraperitoneal administration of checkpoint inhibition, a single application of IFN-β plasmid transfection reduced tumor growth in vivo and recruited efficacious immune cells at both the local and distant tumor sites.

    View details for DOI 10.1073/pnas.1914906117

    View details for PubMedID 32430322

  • Engineering personalized peptide-based cancer nanovaccines Kakwere, H., Zhang, H., Kheirolomoom, A., Ferrara, K. AMER CHEMICAL SOC. 2019
  • Tumor-specific delivery of gemcitabine with activatable liposomes. Journal of controlled release : official journal of the Controlled Release Society Tucci, S. T., Kheirolomoom, A., Ingham, E. S., Mahakian, L. M., Tam, S. M., Foiret, J., Hubbard, N. E., Borowsky, A. D., Baikoghli, M., Cheng, R. H., Ferrara, K. W. 2019

    Abstract

    Gemcitabine delivery to pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is limited by poor pharmacokinetics, dense fibrosis and hypo-vascularization. Activatable liposomes, with drug release resulting from local heating, enhance serum stability and circulation, and the released drug retains the ability to diffuse within the tumor. A limitation of liposomal gemcitabine has been the low loading efficiency. To address this limitation, we used the superior solubilizing potential of copper (II) gluconate to form a complex with gemcitabine at copper:gemcitabine (1:4). Thermosensitive liposomes composed of DPPC:DSPC:DSPE-PEG2k (80:15:5, mole%) then reached 12 wt% loading, 4-fold greater than previously reported values. Cryo transmission electron microscopy confirmed the presence of a liquid crystalline gemcitabine‑copper mixture. The optimized gemcitabine liposomes released 60% and 80% of the gemcitabine within 1 and 5 min, respectively, at 42 °C. Liposomal encapsulation resulted in a circulation half-life of ~2 h in vivo (compared to reported circulation of 16 min for free gemcitabine in mice), and free drug was not detected within the plasma. The resulting gemcitabine liposomes were efficacious against both murine breast cancer and pancreatic cancer in vitro. Three repeated treatments of activatable gemcitabine liposomes plus ultrasound hyperthermia regressed or eliminated tumors in the neu deletion model of murine breast cancer with limited toxicity, enhancing survival when compared to treatment with gemcitabine alone. With 5% of the free gemcitabine dose (5 rather than 100 mg/kg), tumor growth was suppressed to the same degree as gemcitabine. Additionally, in a more aggressive tumor model of murine pancreatic cancer, liposomal gemcitabine combined with local hyperthermia induced cell death and regions of apoptosis and necrosis.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.jconrel.2019.07.014

    View details for PubMedID 31301340

  • Localized nanodelivery combined with immunotherapy promotes curative anti-tumor responses in a murine breast cancer model Kheirolomoom, A., Silvestrini, M. T., Ingham, E. S., Mahakian, L. M., Tam, S. M., Tumbale, S. K., Foiret, J., Hubbard, N. E., Borowsky, A. D., Murphy, W. J., Ferrara, K. W. AMER ASSOC CANCER RESEARCH. 2019
  • Activatable nanodelivery of high payload gemcitabine augments therapeutic efficacy in murine breast and pancreatic cancer models Tucci, S. T., Kheirolomoom, A., Ingham, E. S., Mahakian, L. M., Tam, S. M., Foiret, J., Hubbard, N. E., Borowsky, A. D., Baikoghli, M., Cheng, R., Ferrara, K. W. AMER ASSOC CANCER RESEARCH. 2019
  • Combining activatable nanodelivery with immunotherapy in a murine breast cancer model JOURNAL OF CONTROLLED RELEASE Kheirolomoom, A., Silvestrini, M. T., Ingham, E. S., Mahakian, L. M., Tam, S. M., Tumbale, S. K., Foiret, J., Hubbard, N. E., Borowsky, A. D., Ferrara, K. W. 2019; 303: 42–54
  • Combining activatable nanodelivery with immunotherapy in a murine breast cancer model. Journal of controlled release : official journal of the Controlled Release Society Kheirolomoom, A., Silvestrini, M. T., Ingham, E. S., Mahakian, L. M., Tam, S. M., Tumbale, S. K., Foiret, J., Hubbard, N. E., Borowsky, A. D., Ferrara, K. W. 2019

    Abstract

    A successful chemotherapy-immunotherapy solid-tumor protocol should accomplish the following goals: debulk large tumors, release tumor antigen for cross-presentation and cross-priming, release cancer-suppressive cytokines and enhance anti-tumor immune cell populations. Thermally-activated drug delivery particles have the potential to synergize with immunotherapeutics to accomplish these goals; activation can release chemotherapy within bulky solid tumors and can enhance response when combined with immunotherapy. We set out to determine whether a single protocol, combining locally-activated chemotherapy and agonist immunotherapy, could accomplish these goals and yield a potentially translational therapy. For effective delivery of free doxorubicin to tumors with minimal toxicity, we stabilized doxorubicin with copper in temperature-sensitive liposomes that rapidly release free drug in the vasculature of cancer lesions upon exposure to ultrasound-mediated hyperthermia. We found that in vitro exposure of tumor cells to hyperthermia and doxorubicin resulted in immunogenic cell death and the local release of type I interferons across murine cancer cell lines. Following intravenous injection, local activation of the liposomes within a single tumor released doxorubicin and enhanced cross-presentation of a model antigen at distant tumor sites. While a variety of protocols achieved a complete response in >50% of treated mice, the complete response rate was greatest (90%) when 1 week of immunotherapy priming preceded a single activatable chemotherapeutic administration. While repeated chemotherapeutic delivery reduced local viable tumor, the complete response rate and a subset of tumor immune cells were also reduced. Taken together, the results suggest that activatable chemotherapy can enhance adjuvant immunotherapy; however, in a murine model the systemic adaptive immune response was greatest with a single administration of chemotherapy.

    View details for PubMedID 30978432

  • A Scalable Method for Squalenoylation and Assembly of Multifunctional 64Cu-Labeled Squalenoylated Gemcitabine Nanoparticles. Nanotheranostics Tucci, S. T., Seo, J. W., Kakwere, H., Kheirolomoom, A., Ingham, E. S., Mahakian, L. M., Tam, S., Tumbale, S., Baikoghli, M., Cheng, R. H., Ferrara, K. W. 2018; 2 (4): 387–402

    Abstract

    Squalenoylation of gemcitabine, a front-line therapy for pancreatic cancer, allows for improved cellular-level and system-wide drug delivery. The established methods to conjugate squalene to gemcitabine and to form nanoparticles (NPs) with the squalenoylated gemcitabine (SqGem) conjugate are cumbersome, time-consuming and can be difficult to reliably replicate. Further, the creation of multi-functional SqGem-based NP theranostics would facilitate characterization of in vivo pharmacokinetics and efficacy. Methods: Squalenoylation conjugation chemistry was enhanced to improve reliability and scalability using tert-butyldimethylsilyl (TBDMS) protecting groups. We then optimized a scalable microfluidic mixing platform to produce SqGem-based NPs and evaluated the stability and morphology of select NP formulations using dynamic light scattering (DLS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Cytotoxicity was evaluated in both PANC-1 and KPC (KrasLSL-G12D/+; Trp53LSL-R172H/+; Pdx-Cre) pancreatic cancer cell lines. A 64Cu chelator (2-S-(4-aminobenzyl)-1,4,7-triazacyclononane-1,4,7-triacetic acid, NOTA) was squalenoylated and used with positron emission tomography (PET) imaging to monitor the in vivo fate of SqGem-based NPs. Results: Squalenoylation yields of gemcitabine increased from 15% to 63%. Cholesterol-PEG-2k inclusion was required to form SqGem-based NPs using our technique, and additional cholesterol inclusion increased particle stability at room temperature; after 1 week the PDI of SqGem NPs with cholesterol was ~ 0.2 while the PDI of SqGem NPs lacking cholesterol was ~ 0.5. Similar or superior cytotoxicity was achieved for SqGem-based NPs compared to gemcitabine or Abraxane when evaluated at a concentration of 10 M. Squalenoylation of NOTA enabled in vivo monitoring of SqGem-based NP pharmacokinetics and biodistribution. Conclusion: We present a scalable technique for fabricating efficacious squalenoylated-gemcitabine nanoparticles and confirm their pharmacokinetic profile using a novel multifunctional 64Cu-SqNOTA-SqGem NP.

    View details for PubMedID 30324084