Education & Certifications


  • Master of Science, Stanford University, BIOE-MS (2018)

Stanford Advisors


All Publications


  • Bioprinting of stem cell expansion lattices ACTA BIOMATERIALIA Lindsay, C. D., Roth, J. G., LeSavage, B. L., Heilshorn, S. C. 2019; 95: 225–35
  • Matrix Remodeling Enhances the Differentiation Capacity of Neural Progenitor Cells in 3D Hydrogels ADVANCED SCIENCE Madl, C. M., LeSavage, B. L., Dewi, R. E., Lampe, K. J., Heilshorn, S. C. 2019; 6 (4): 1801716

    Abstract

    Neural progenitor cells (NPCs) are a promising cell source to repair damaged nervous tissue. However, expansion of therapeutically relevant numbers of NPCs and their efficient differentiation into desired mature cell types remains a challenge. Material-based strategies, including culture within 3D hydrogels, have the potential to overcome these current limitations. An ideal material would enable both NPC expansion and subsequent differentiation within a single platform. It has recently been demonstrated that cell-mediated remodeling of 3D hydrogels is necessary to maintain the stem cell phenotype of NPCs during expansion, but the role of matrix remodeling on NPC differentiation and maturation remains unknown. By culturing NPCs within engineered protein hydrogels susceptible to degradation by NPC-secreted proteases, it is identified that a critical amount of remodeling is necessary to enable NPC differentiation, even in highly degradable gels. Chemical induction of differentiation after sufficient remodeling time results in differentiation into astrocytes and neurotransmitter-responsive neurons. Matrix remodeling modulates expression of the transcriptional co-activator Yes-associated protein, which drives expression of NPC stemness factors and maintains NPC differentiation capacity, in a cadherin-dependent manner. Thus, cell-remodelable hydrogels are an attractive platform to enable expansion of NPCs followed by differentiation of the cells into mature phenotypes for therapeutic use.

    View details for PubMedID 30828535

  • Production of Elastin-like Protein Hydrogels for Encapsulation and Immunostaining of Cells in 3D. Journal of visualized experiments : JoVE LeSavage, B. L., Suhar, N. A., Madl, C. M., Heilshorn, S. C. 2018

    Abstract

    Two-dimensional (2D) tissue culture techniques have been essential for our understanding of fundamental cell biology. However, traditional 2D tissue culture systems lack a three-dimensional (3D) matrix, resulting in a significant disconnect between results collected in vitro and in vivo. To address this limitation, researchers have engineered 3D hydrogel tissue culture platforms that can mimic the biochemical and biophysical properties of the in vivo cell microenvironment. This research has motivated the need to develop material platforms that support 3D cell encapsulation and downstream biochemical assays. Recombinant protein engineering offers a unique toolset for 3D hydrogel material design and development by allowing for the specific control of protein sequence and therefore, by extension, the potential mechanical and biochemical properties of the resultant matrix. Here, we present a protocol for the expression of recombinantly-derived elastin-like protein (ELP), which can be used to form hydrogels with independently tunable mechanical properties and cell-adhesive ligand concentration. We further present a methodology for cell encapsulation within ELP hydrogels and subsequent immunofluorescent staining of embedded cells for downstream analysis and quantification.

    View details for PubMedID 29863669

  • Maintenance of neural progenitor cell stemness in 3D hydrogels requires matrix remodelling. Nature materials Madl, C. M., LeSavage, B. L., Dewi, R. E., Dinh, C. B., Stowers, R. S., Khariton, M., Lampe, K. J., Nguyen, D., Chaudhuri, O., Enejder, A., Heilshorn, S. C. 2017; 16 (12): 1233–42

    Abstract

    Neural progenitor cell (NPC) culture within three-dimensional (3D) hydrogels is an attractive strategy for expanding a therapeutically relevant number of stem cells. However, relatively little is known about how 3D material properties such as stiffness and degradability affect the maintenance of NPC stemness in the absence of differentiation factors. Over a physiologically relevant range of stiffness from ∼0.5 to 50 kPa, stemness maintenance did not correlate with initial hydrogel stiffness. In contrast, hydrogel degradation was both correlated with, and necessary for, maintenance of NPC stemness. This requirement for degradation was independent of cytoskeletal tension generation and presentation of engineered adhesive ligands, instead relying on matrix remodelling to facilitate cadherin-mediated cell-cell contact and promote β-catenin signalling. In two additional hydrogel systems, permitting NPC-mediated matrix remodelling proved to be a generalizable strategy for stemness maintenance in 3D. Our findings have identified matrix remodelling, in the absence of cytoskeletal tension generation, as a previously unknown strategy to maintain stemness in 3D.

    View details for PubMedID 29115291