Honors & Awards


  • Marshall Scholarship, Marshall Aid Commemoration Commission (2016-2019)

Education & Certifications


  • Bachelor of Arts, Harvard College, Economics (2016)
  • Master of Science, London School of Economics and Political Science, Economics (2018)
  • MPH, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Public Health (2019)

All Publications


  • Safety of Foregoing Operation for Small Bowel Obstruction in the Virgin Abdomen: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. Journal of the American College of Surgeons Choi, J., Fisher, A. T., Mulaney, B., Anand, A., Carlos, G., Stave, C. D., Spain, D. A., Weiser, T. G. 2020

    Abstract

    Our objective was to assess the safety of foregoing surgery in patients without abdominopelvic surgery history presenting with small bowel obstruction (SBO). Classic dogma has counseled early surgical intervention for small bowel obstruction (SBO) in the virgin abdomen - patients without abdominopelvic surgery history - given their presumed higher risk of malignant or potentially catastrophic etiologies compared to those who underwent prior abdominal operations. The term virgin abdomen was coined before widespread use of computed tomography, which now elucidates many SBO etiologies. Despite recent efforts to re-evaluate clinical management standards, the prevalence of SBO etiologies in the virgin abdomen and the current management landscape (non-operative vs operative) in these patients remain unclear. Our random-effects meta-analysis of six studies including 442 patients found the prevalence of malignant etiologies in patients without abdominopelvic surgery history presenting with SBO varied from 7.7% [95% CI:3.0-14.1] to 13.4% [95% CI:7.6-20.3] on sensitivity analysis. Most malignant etiologies were not suspected prior to surgery. De novo adhesions (54%) were the most common etiology. Over half of patients underwent a trial of non-operative management, which often failed. Subgroups of patients likely have variable risk profiles for underlying malignant etiologies, yet no study had consistent follow-up data and we did not find convincing evidence that foregoing operative management altogether in this population can be generally recommended.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.jamcollsurg.2020.06.010

    View details for PubMedID 32574687