Bio-X


Showing 61-79 of 79 Results

  • Mark Brongersma

    Mark Brongersma

    Professor of Materials Science and Engineering and, by courtesy, of Applied Physics

    BioMark Brongersma is a Professor in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at Stanford University. He received his PhD in Materials Science from the FOM Institute in Amsterdam, The Netherlands, in 1998. From 1998-2001 he was a postdoctoral research fellow at the California Institute of Technology. During this time, he coined the term “Plasmonics” for a new device technology that exploits the unique optical properties of nanoscale metallic structures to route and manipulate light at the nanoscale. His current research is directed towards the development and physical analysis of nanostructured materials that find application in nanoscale electronic and photonic devices. Brongersma received a National Science Foundation Career Award, the Walter J. Gores Award for Excellence in Teaching, the International Raymond and Beverly Sackler Prize in the Physical Sciences (Physics) for his work on plasmonics, and is a Fellow of the Optical Society of America, the SPIE, and the American Physical Society.

  • Helen Bronte-Stewart, MD, MS

    Helen Bronte-Stewart, MD, MS

    John E. Cahill Family Professor, Professor of Neurology and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research focus is human motor control and brain pathophysiology in movement disorders. Our overall goal is to understand the role of the basal ganglia electrical activity in the pathogenesis of movement disorders. We have developed novel computerized technology to measure fine, limb and postural movement. With these we are measuring local field potentials in basal ganglia nuclei in patients with Parkinson's disease and dystonian and correlating brain signalling with motor behavior.

  • James D. Brooks

    James D. Brooks

    Keith and Jan Hurlbut Professor in the Stanford University School of Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe use genomic approaches to identify disease biomarkers. We are most interested in translating biomarkers into clinical practice in urological diseases with a particular focus in cancer.

  • Gordon Brown

    Gordon Brown

    Dorrell William Kirby Professor of Geology in the School of Earth Sciences, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsSurface and interface geochemistry; environmental fate of heavy metals; nanotechnology, applications of synchrotron radiation in geochemistry and mineralogy

  • Martin Brown

    Martin Brown

    Professor of Radiation Oncology, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe seek to understand the mechanisms responsible for the resistance of cancers to treatment and to develop strategies to overcome these resistances. We are using molecular and cellular techniques and mouse models to potentiate the activity of radiation on tumors by inhibiting the bone marrow rescue of the tumor vasculature following therapy.

  • Patrick O. Brown

    Patrick O. Brown

    Professor of Biochemistry, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Brown, currently an emeritus professor, is CEO and founder of Impossible Foods, a company dedicated to replacing the world's most destructive technology - the use of animals to transform plant biomass into meat, fish and dairy foods - by developing a new and better way to produce the world's most delicious, nutritious and affordable meats, fish and dairy foods directly from plants. Visit impossiblefoods.com for more information.

  • Anne Brunet

    Anne Brunet

    Michele and Timothy Barakett Endowed Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur lab studies the molecular basis of longevity. We are interested in the mechanism of action of known longevity genes, including FOXO and SIRT, in the mammalian nervous system. We are particularly interested in the role of these longevity genes in neural stem cells. We are also discovering novel genes and processes involved in aging using two short-lived model systems, the invertebrate C. elegans and an extremely short-lived vertebrate, the African killifish N. furzeri.

  • Axel Brunger

    Axel Brunger

    Professor of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, of Neurology, of Photon Science and, by courtesy, of Structural Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOne of Axel Brunger's major goals is to decipher the molecular mechanisms of synaptic neurotransmitter release by conducting imaging and single-molecule/particle reconstitution experiments, combined with near-atomic resolution structural studies of the synaptic vesicle fusion machinery.

  • Douglas L. Brutlag

    Douglas L. Brutlag

    Professor of Biochemistry, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy primary interest is to understand the flow of information from the genome to the phenotype of an organism. This interest includes predicting the structure and function of genes and proteins from their primary sequence, predicting function from structure simulating protein folding and ligand docking, and predicitng disease from genome variations. These goals are the same as the goals of molecular biology, however, we use primarily computational approaches.

  • Zev Bryant

    Zev Bryant

    Associate Professor of Bioengineering and, by courtesy, of Structural Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMolecular motors lie at the heart of biological processes from DNA replication to vesicle transport. My laboratory seeks to understand the physical mechanisms by which these nanoscale machines convert chemical energy into mechanical work.

  • Bruce Buckingham

    Bruce Buckingham

    Professor of Pediatrics (Endocrinology) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy major interest is in type 1 diabetes mellitus, continuous glucose sensor, and the development of an artificial pancreas. Other research interests include using continuous glucose monitoring and algorithms to control blood glucose levels in intensive care units.

  • Paul Buckmaster, DVM, PhD

    Paul Buckmaster, DVM, PhD

    Professor of Comparative Medicine and of Neurology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMechanisms of epilepsy, especially temporal lobe epilepsy.

  • Philip Bucksbaum

    Philip Bucksbaum

    Marguerite Blake Wilbur Professor in Natural Science and Professor of Photon Science, of Applied Physics, of Physics and Director, Stanford PULSE Institute

    BioPhil Bucksbaum holds the Marguerite Blake Wilbur Chair in Natural Science at Stanford University, with appointments in Physics, Applied Physics, and in Photon Science at SLAC. He conducts his research in the Stanford PULSE Institute (https://web.stanford.edu/~phbuck). He and his wife Roberta Morris live in Menlo Park, California with their cat. Their grown daughter lives in Toronto.

    Bucksbaum was born and raised in Iowa, and graduated from Harvard in 1975. He attended U.C. Berkeley on a National Science Foundation Graduate Fellowship and received his Ph.D. in 1980 for atomic parity violation experiments under Professor Eugene Commins, with whom he also has co-authored a textbook, “Weak Interactions of Leptons and Quarks.” In 1981 he joined Bell Laboratories, where he pursued new applications of ultrafast coherent radiation from terahertz to vacuum ultraviolet, including time-resolved VUV ARPES, and strong-field laser-atom physics.

    He joined the University of Michigan in 1990 and stayed for sixteen years, becoming Otto Laporte Collegiate Professor and then Peter Franken University Professor. He was founding Director of FOCUS, a National Science Foundation Physics Frontier Center, where he pioneered research using ultrafast lasers to control quantum systems. He also launched the first experiments in ultrafast x-ray science at the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Lab. In 2006 Bucksbaum moved to Stanford and SLAC, and organized the PULSE Institute to develop research utilizing the world’s first hard x-ray free-electron laser, LCLS. In addition to directing PULSE, he has previously served as Department Chair of Photon Science and Division Director for Chemical Science at SLAC. His current research is in laser interrogation of atoms and molecules to explore and image structure and dynamics on the femtosecond scale. He currently has more than 250 publications.

    Bucksbaum is a Fellow of the APS and the Optical Society, and has been elected to the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He has held Guggenheim and Miller Fellowships, and was Optical Society President in 2014. He will serve as the President of the American Physical Society in 2020. He has led or participated in many professional service activities, including NAS studies, national and international boards, initiatives, lectureships and editorships.

  • Marion S. Buckwalter, MD, PhD

    Marion S. Buckwalter, MD, PhD

    Associate Professor of Neurology and of Neurosurgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe goal of the Buckwalter Lab is to improve how people recover after a stroke. We use basic research to understand the cells, proteins, and genes that lead to successful recovery of function, and also how complications develop that impact quality of life after stroke. Ongoing projects are focused on understanding how inflammatory responses are regulated after a stroke and how to make recovery faster and better after stroke.

  • Marshall Burke

    Marshall Burke

    Associate Professor of Earth System Science and Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies

    BioMarshall Burke is an assistant professor in the Department of Earth System Science, deputy director at the Center on Food Security and the Environment, and center fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies (FSI) at Stanford University. He is also a faculty research fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research, and a co-founder of AtlasAI, a remote sensing start-up. His research focuses on social and economic impacts of environmental change and on measuring and understanding economic development in emerging markets. His work has appeared in both economic and scientific journals, including recent publications in Nature, Science, The Quarterly Journal of Economics, and The Lancet. He holds a PhD in agricultural and resource economics from the University of California, Berkeley and a BA in international relations from Stanford University.

    Prospective students should see my personal webpage, linked at right.

  • Carlos Bustamante

    Carlos Bustamante

    Professor of Biomedical Data Science, of Genetics and, by courtesy, of Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy genetics research focuses on analyzing genome wide patterns of variation within and between species to address fundamental questions in biology, anthropology, and medicine. We focus on novel methods development for complex disease genetics and risk prediction in multi-ethnic settings. I am also interested in clinical data science and development of new diagnostics.I am also interested in disruptive innovation for healthcare including modeling long-term risk shifts and novel payment models.

  • Eugene Butcher

    Eugene Butcher

    Klaus Bensch Professor in Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur interests include:
    1) The physiology and function of lymphocyte homing in local and systemic immunity;
    2) Biochemical and genetic studies of molecules that direct leukocyte recruitment;
    3) Chemotactic mechanisms and receptors in vascular and immune biology;
    4) Vascular control of normal and pathologic inflammation and immunity;
    5) Systems biology of immune cell trafficking and programming in tumor immunity.

  • Robert Byer

    Robert Byer

    The William R. Kenan, Jr. Professor and Professor of Photon Science

    BioRobert L. Byer has served as President of The American Physical Society, of the Optical Society of America and of the IEEE LEOS. He has served as Vice Provost and Dean of Research at Stanford. He has been Chair of the Department of Applied Physics, Director of the Edward L. Ginzton Laboratory and Director of the Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory. He is a founding member of the California Council on Science and Technology and served as Chair from 1995-1999. He was a member of the Air Force Scientific Advisory Board from 2002-2006 and has been a member of the National Ignition Facility since 2000.

    Robert L. Byer has conducted research and taught classes in lasers and nonlinear optics at Stanford University since 1969. He has made extraordinary contributions to laser science and technology including the demonstration of the first tunable visible parametric oscillator, the development of the Q-switched unstable resonator Nd:YAG laser, remote sensing using tunable infrared sources and precision spectroscopy using Coherent Anti Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS). Current research includes precision laser measurements in support of the detection of gravitational waves and laser “Accelerator on a chip”.