Bio-X


Showing 1-10 of 64 Results

  • Shamit Kachru

    Shamit Kachru

    Professor of Physics and Director, Stanford Institute for Theoretical Physics, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy current research is focused in three directions:

    — Mathematical aspects of string theory (with a focus on BPS state counts, black holes, and moonshine)

    — Quantum field theory approaches to condensed matter physics (with a focus on physics of non-Fermi liquids)

    — Theoretical biology, with a focus on evolution and ecology

  • Joseph Kahn

    Joseph Kahn

    Professor of Electrical Engineering

    BioJoseph M. Kahn is a Professor of Electrical Engineering at Stanford University. His research addresses communication and imaging through optical fibers, including modulation, detection, signal processing and spatial multiplexing. He received A.B. and Ph.D. degrees in Physics from U.C. Berkeley in 1981 and 1986. From 1987-1990, he was at AT&T Bell Laboratories, Crawford Hill Laboratory, in Holmdel, NJ. He was on the Electrical Engineering faculty at U.C. Berkeley from 1990-2003. In 2000, he co-founded StrataLight Communications, which was acquired by Opnext, Inc. in 2009. He received the National Science Foundation Presidential Young Investigator Award in 1991 and is a Fellow of the IEEE.

  • A Dale Kaiser

    A Dale Kaiser

    Member, Bio-X

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsHow are genes regulated to construct a developmental program? How do signals received from other cells change the program and coordinate it for multicellular development? The approach taken by our laboratory group to answer these questions utilizes biochemistry and genetics; genetics to isolate mutants that have particular defects in development and biochemistry to determine the molecular basis of the defects. We study swarming in Myxococcus xanthus that builds fruiting bodies.

  • Anusha Kalbasi, M.D.

    Anusha Kalbasi, M.D.

    Associate Professor of Radiation Oncology (Radiation Therapy)

    BioDr. Kalbasi is a board-certified radiation oncologist and physician-scientist at the Stanford Cancer Institute. He is also an associate professor of radiation oncology at Stanford Medicine and a project member of the Parker Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy.

    In the clinic, Dr. Kalbasi specializes in the diagnosis and treatment of solid tumors, especially sarcoma and melanoma, with a focus on bringing new treatments to patients. This focus includes using advanced techniques in radiation oncology and cancer immunotherapy.

    Dr. Kalbasi's NIH-funded laboratory studies the cancer-immune interface in various therapeutic contexts, including T cell therapy, cytokine therapy and innate immune agonism. The lab has described tumor cell-, T cell- and myeloid cell-intrinsic mechanisms of resistance to therapy and approaches to overcome therapy resistance. Dr. Kalbasi is also an experienced leader of clinical trials related to immunotherapy, T cell therapy and radiation therapy.

    Prior to his arrival at Stanford Health Care, Dr. Kalbasi was assistant professor of radiation oncology in the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA and chief of sarcoma radiotherapy at the UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center. During his tenure, he was named a NextGen Star by the American Association of Cancer Research in recognition for excellence in cancer research.

    Dr. Kalbasi’s work has been published in leading journals including Nature, Science Translational Medicine, JAMA Oncology, Lancet Oncology, Nature Cancer and Cancer Discovery. He has served as a peer reviewer for multiple prestigious journals, including the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Cell and the Journal of Clinical Investigation. He has also presented research to his peers at the American Association for Cancer Research and the American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  • Julia Kaltschmidt

    Julia Kaltschmidt

    Associate Professor of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe lab’s primary research interest is to understand how specific neuronal circuits are established. We use mouse genetics, combinatorial immunochemical labeling and high-resolution laser scanning microscopy to identify, manipulate, and quantitatively analyze synaptic contacts within the complex neuronal milieu of the spinal cord and the enteric nervous system.

  • Aya Kamaya, MD

    Aya Kamaya, MD

    Professor of Radiology (Body Imaging)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsHepatobiliary imaging
    Hepatocellular carcinoma
    Urologic imaging
    Gynecologic imaging
    Thyroid imaging
    Novel ultrasound technologies
    Perfusion CT imaging of abdominal tumors

  • Matthew Kanan

    Matthew Kanan

    Professor of Chemistry

    BioAssociate Professor of Chemistry Matthew Kanan develops new catalysts and chemical reactions for applications in renewable energy conversion and CO2 utilization. His group at Stanford University has recently developed a novel method to create plastic from carbon dioxide and inedible plant material rather than petroleum products, and pioneered the study of “defect-rich” heterogeneous electro-catalysts for converting carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide to liquid fuel.

    Matthew Kanan completed undergraduate study in chemistry at Rice University (B.A. 2000 Summa Cum Laude, Phi Beta Kappa). During doctoral research in organic chemistry at Harvard University (Ph.D. 2005), he developed a novel method for using DNA to discover new chemical reactions. He then moved into inorganic chemistry for his postdoctoral studies as a National Institutes of Health Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he discovered a water oxidation catalyst that operates in neutral water. He joined the Stanford Chemistry Department faculty in 2009 to continue research into energy-related catalysis and reactions. His research and teaching have already been recognized in selection as one of Chemistry & Engineering News’ first annual Talented 12, the Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Award, Eli Lilly New Faculty Award, and recognition as a Camille and Henry Dreyfus Environmental Mentor, among other honors.

    The Kanan Lab addresses fundamental challenges in catalysis and synthesis with an emphasis on enabling new technologies for scalable CO2 utilization. The interdisciplinary effort spans organic synthesis, materials chemistry and electrochemistry.

    One of the greatest challenges of the 21st century is to transition to an energy economy with ultra-low greenhouse gas emissions without compromising quality of life for a growing population. The Kanan Lab aims to help enable this transition by developing catalysts and chemical reactions that recycle CO2 into fuels and commodity chemicals using renewable energy sources. To be implemented on a substantial scale, these methods must ultimately be competitive with fossil fuels and petrochemicals. With this requirement in mind, the group focuses on the fundamental chemical challenge of making carbon–carbon (C–C) bonds because multi-carbon compounds have higher energy density, greater value, and more diverse applications that one-carbon compounds. Both electrochemical and chemical methods are being pursued. For electrochemical conversion, the group studies how defects known as grain boundaries can be exploited to improve CO2/CO electro-reduction catalysis. Recent work has unveiled quantitative correlations between grain boundaries and catalytic activity, establishing a new design principle for electrocatalysis, and developed grain boundary-rich copper catalysts with unparalleled activity for converting carbon monoxide to liquid fuel. For chemical CO2 conversion, the group is developing C–H carboxylation and CO2 hydrogenation reactions that are promoted by simple carbonate salts. These reactions provide a way to make C–C bonds between un-activated substrates and CO2 without resorting to energy-intensive and hazardous reagents. Among numerous applications, carbonate-promoted carboxylation enables the synthesis of a monomer used to make polyester plastic from CO2 and a feedstock derived from agricultural waste.

    In addition to CO2 chemistry, the Kanan group is pursuing new strategies to control selectivity in molecular catalysis for fine chemical synthesis. Of particular interest in the use of electrostatic interactions to discriminate between competing reaction pathways based on their charge distributions. This effort uses ion pairing or interfaces to control the local electrostatic environment in which a reaction takes place. The group has recently shown that local electric fields can control regioselectivity in isomerization reactions catalyzed by gold complexes.

  • Peter Kao

    Peter Kao

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur research program has several active projects:
    1.) Pulmonary Vascular Disease – Simvastatin reversed experimental pulmonary hypertension, and is safe for treatment of patients. Blinded clinical trials of efficacy are in progress.
    2.) Lung inflammation and regeneration (stem cells)
    3.) Lung surfactant rheology and oxidative stress
    4.) Gene regulation by RNA binding proteins, NF45 and NF90 through transcriptional and posttranscriptional mechanisms

  • Ioannis Karakikes

    Ioannis Karakikes

    Associate Professor (Research) of Cardiothoracic Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe Karakikes Lab aims to uncover fundamental new insights into the molecular mechanisms and functional consequences of pathogenic mutations associated with familial cardiovascular diseases.

  • Hemamala Karunadasa

    Hemamala Karunadasa

    Associate Professor of Chemistry

    BioProfessor Hema Karunadasa works with colleagues in materials science, earth science, and applied physics to drive the discovery of new materials with applications in clean energy. Using the tools of synthetic chemistry, her group designs materials that couple the structural tunability of organic molecules with the diverse electronic and optical properties of extended inorganic solids. This research targets materials such as sorbents for capturing environmental pollutants, phosphors for solid-state lighting, and absorbers for solar cells.

    Hemamala Karunadasa studied chemistry and materials science at Princeton University (A.B. with high honors 2003; Certificate in Materials Science and Engineering 2003), where her undergraduate thesis project with Professor Robert J. Cava examined geometric magnetic frustration in metal oxides. She moved from solid-state chemistry to solution-state chemistry for her doctoral studies in inorganic chemistry at the University of California, Berkeley (Ph.D. 2009) with Professor Jeffrey R. Long. Her thesis focused on heavy atom building units for magnetic molecules and molecular catalysts for generating hydrogen from water. She continued to study molecular electrocatalysts for water splitting during postdoctoral research with Berkeley Professors Christopher J. Chang and Jeffrey R. Long at the Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. She further explored molecular catalysts for hydrocarbon oxidation as a postdoc at the California Institute of Technology with Professor Harry B. Gray. She joined the Stanford Chemistry Department faculty in September 2012. Her research explores solution-state routes to new solid-state materials.

    Professor Karunadasa’s lab at Stanford takes a molecular approach to extended solids. Lab members gain expertise in solution- and solid-state synthetic techniques and structure determination through powder- and single-crystal x-ray diffraction. Lab tools also include a host of spectroscopic and electrochemical probes, imaging methods, and film deposition techniques. Group members further characterize their materials under extreme environments and in operating devices to tune new materials for diverse applications in renewable energy.

    Please visit the lab website for more details and recent news.