Bio-X


Showing 11-20 of 24 Results

  • Lorene Nelson, PhD

    Lorene Nelson, PhD

    Associate Professor of Epidemiology and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPrimary research interests:
    - genetic, environmental and lifestyle determinants of neurodegenerative disorders
    (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, migraine)
    - innovative study design and data ecosystems in clinical and public health

    Primary educational interests:
    - Training of next generation scientists in advanced data science and analytic methods
    in population, social, and behavioral health sciences.

  • William Nelson

    William Nelson

    Rudy J. and Daphne Donohue Munzer Professor in the School of Medicine, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur research objectives are to understand the cellular mechanisms involved in the development and maintenance of epithelial cell polarity. Polarized epithelial cells play fundamental roles in the ontogeny and function of a variety of tissues and organs.

  • Aaron Newman

    Aaron Newman

    Assistant Professor of Biomedical Data Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur group develops computational strategies to study the phenotypic diversity, differentiation hierarchies, and clinical significance of tumor cell subsets. Key results are further explored experimentally, both in our lab and through collaboration, with the ultimate goal of translating promising findings into the clinic.

  • William Newsome

    William Newsome

    Vincent V.C. Woo Director of the Wu Tsai Neuroscience Institute, Harman Family Provostial Professor and Professor of Neurobiology and, by courtesy, of Psychology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsNeural processes that mediate visual perception and visually-based decision making. Influence of reward history on decision making.

  • Mindie H. Nguyen, MD, MAS, AGAF, FAASLD

    Mindie H. Nguyen, MD, MAS, AGAF, FAASLD

    Professor of Medicine (Gastroenterology and Hepatology) and, by courtesy, of Epidemiology and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe conduct clinical trials and epidemiological, translational, and real-world studies of liver cancer, fatty liver (NASH, NAFLD), viral hepatitis B and C, liver cirrhosis, and liver transplant. We focus on risk identification for disease prevention and treatment for improvement of survival. We focus on sex, racial/ethnic, and socioeconomic disparities. We specialize in clinical trials, large international real-world consortium registry data, and large public/semi-public databases.

  • Teresa Nicolson, PhD

    Teresa Nicolson, PhD

    Edward C. and Amy H. Sewall Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur aim is to understand the molecular basis of hearing and balance. We use zebrafish as our model system, which offers distinct advantages for imaging auditory/vestibular and lateral line hair cells in intact animals. Our experiments focus on the function of deafness genes isolated from forward genetic screens and developmental aspects of sensory hair-cell activity and synaptogenesis.

  • Dwight Nishimura

    Dwight Nishimura

    Addie and Al Macovski Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly Interestsmedical imaging, magnetic resonance imaging

  • Julia E. Noel, MD

    Julia E. Noel, MD

    Assistant Professor of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery (OHNS)

    BioDr. Noel is a head and neck surgeon with fellowship training in endocrine surgery and board certification in otolaryngology. She is an assistant professor in the Department of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    She specializes in surgery of the thyroid and parathyroid glands and lymph nodes. She has additional expertise and training in minimally invasive treatment approaches and ultrasound-guided techniques performed in the office, such as Radiofrequency Ablation (RFA) and alcohol ablation.

    Among the many conditions she treats are thyroid cancer, thyroid nodules, hyperthyroidism, hyperparathyroidism, hypercalcemia, Grave’s disease, and goiter.

    For every patient, Dr. Noel prepares a personalized care plan that is comprehensive and compassionate. Her goal is to educate and empower each patient to achieve the best possible health and quality of life. Patient reviews praise her clinical expertise as well as her skills as a listener and communicator.

    Dr. Noel conducts a robust research program to advance patient care. She has published extensively on the diagnosis, appropriate management, and optimization of outcomes for patients with thyroid and parathyroid disorders. Her articles have appeared in JAMA Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Nature Communications, Endocrine Practice, and many more peer-reviewed journals. She has co-authored numerous guideline and consensus statements, including an international statement on the use of RFA in benign and malignant thyroid nodules.

    She serves as associate editor of the endocrine section for the journal Laryngoscope Investigative Otolaryngology. She is additionally an editorial board member for VideoEndocrinology, a video journal covering leading-edge diagnostic and treatment techniques and technologies.

    Dr. Noel has made presentations to her peers at national and international meetings of the American Academy of Otolaryngology, Head & Neck Surgery, American Thyroid Association, American Head & Neck Society, and the World Congress of Thyroid Cancer. She also has shared her insights into the future of thyroid surgery at the International Thyroid Cancer Survivors’ Conference.

    She is a member of the American Academy of Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, American Head and Neck Society, American Thyroid Association, American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists, and American College of Surgeons.

  • Hae Young Noh

    Hae Young Noh

    Associate Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    BioHae Young Noh is an associate professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering. Her research introduced the new concept of “structures as sensors” to enable physical structures (e.g., buildings and vehicle frames) to be user- and environment-aware. In particular, these structures indirectly sense humans and surrounding environments through their structural responses (i.e., vibrations) by inferring the desired information (e.g., human behaviors, environmental conditions, heating and cooling system performance), instead of directly measuring the sensing targets with additional dedicated sensors (e.g., cameras, motion sensors). This concept brought a paradigm shift in how we view these structures and how the structures interact with us.
    Traditionally, structures that we inhabit (such as buildings or vehicles) are considered as passive and unchanging objects that we need to monitor and control, utilizing a dense set of sensors to collect information. This has often been complicated by “noise” caused by the occupants and environments. For example, building vibrations induced by indoor and outdoor environmental and operational conditions (e.g., people walking around, traffic outside, heating system running, etc.), have been often seen as noise that needs to be removed in traditional building science and structural engineering; however, they are a rich source of information about structure, users, environment, and resources. Similarly, in vehicle engineering, researchers and engineers have been investigating control and dynamics to reduce vehicle vibration for safety and comfort. However, vibrations measured inside vehicles contain information about transportation infrastructure, vehicle itself, and driver.
    Noh's work utilizes this “noise” to empower the structures with the ability to perceive and understand the information about users and surroundings using their own responses, and actively adopt and/or interact to enhance their sustainability and the occupants’ quality of life. Since she utilizes the structure itself as a sensing medium, information collection involves a simpler set of hardware that can be easily maintained throughout the structural lifetime. However, the analysis of data to separate the desired information becomes more challenging. This challenge is addressed through high-rate dynamic sensing and multi-source inferencing. Ultimately, her work aims to allow structural systems to become general sensing platforms that are easier and more practical to deploy and maintain in a long-term.
    At Stanford University, Noh received her PhD and MS degrees in the CEE department and her second MS degree in Electrical Engineering. Noh earned her BS in Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at Cornell University.