Bio-X


Showing 701-750 of 956 Results

  • Lawrence Recht, MD

    Lawrence Recht, MD

    Professor of Neurology and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur laboratory focuses on two interrelated projects: (1) assessment of glioma development within the framework of the multistage model of carcinogenesis through utilization of the rodent model of ENU neurocarcinogenesis; and (2) assessment of stem cell specification and pluripotency using an embryonic stem cell model system in which neural differentiation is induced.

  • Kristy Red-Horse

    Kristy Red-Horse

    Associate Professor of Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCardiovascular developmental biology

  • Evan Reed

    Evan Reed

    Associate Professor of Materials Science and Engineering

    BioWe are engaged in theory and modeling of materials at the atomic scale. Our recent work has two primary directions:

    1. Monolayer and few layer materials (i.e. graphene, MoS2) for electronics, NEMS, and energy applications.
    2. Materials at conditions of high temperature, electromagnetic fields, and pressures, including dynamic or shock compression.

    Recent research topics include piezoelectricity and phase change effects in monolayer materials. Past topics include THz radiation generation, energetic materials, and photonic crystals. We develop and utilize computational tools (molecular dynamics statistical methods, electronic structure, materials informatics approaches, etc.) and interact closely with experimentalists.

  • David Rehkopf

    David Rehkopf

    Associate Professor of Epidemiology and Population Health, of Medicine (Primary Care and Population Health) and, by courtesy, of Sociology

    BioI am a social epidemiologist and serve as an Associate Professor in the Department of Epidemiology and Population Health and in the Department of Medicine in the Division of Primary Care and Population Health. I joined the faculty at Stanford School of Medicine in 2011.

    I am currently the co-director of the Stanford Center for Population Health Sciences. In this position I am committed to making high value data resources available to researchers across disciplines in order to better enable them to answer their most pressing clinical and population health questions.

    My own research is focused on understanding the health implications of the myriad decisions that are made by corporations and governments every day - decisions that profoundly shape the social and economic worlds in which we live and work. While these changes are often invisible to us on a daily basis, these seemingly minor actions and decisions form structural nudges that can create better or worse health at a population level. My work demonstrates the health implications of corporate and governmental decisions that can give the public and policy makers evidence to support new strategies for promoting health and well-being. In all of his work, I have a focus on the implications of these exposures for health inequalities.

    Since often policy and programmatic changes can take decades to influence health, my work also includes more basic research in understanding biological signals that may act as early warning signs of systemic disease, in particular accelerated aging. I examine how social and economic policy changes influence a range of early markers of disease and aging, with a particular recent focus on DNA methylation. I am supported by several grants from the National Institute on Aging and the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities to develop new more sensitive ways to understand the health implications of social and economic policy changes.

  • Richard J. Reimer, MD

    Richard J. Reimer, MD

    Associate Professor of Neurology and, by courtesy, of Molecular and Cellular Physiology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsReimer Lab interests

    A primary interest of our lab is to understand how nerve cells make and recycle neurotransmitters, the small molecules that they use to communicate with each other. In better defining these processes we hope to achieve our long-term goal of identifying novel sites for treatment of diseases such as epilepsy and Parkinson Disease. In our studies on neurotransmitter metabolism we have focused our efforts on transporters, a functional class of proteins that move neurotransmitters and other small molecules across membranes in cells. Transporters have many characteristics that make them excellent pharmacological targets, and not surprisingly some of the most effective treatments for neuropsychiatric disorders are directed at transporters. We are specifically focusing on two groups of transporters – vesicular neurotransmitter transporters that package neurotransmitters into vesicles for release, and glutamine transporters that shuttle glutamine, a precursor for two major neurotransmitters glutamate and GABA, to neurons from glia, the supporting cells that surround them. We are pursuing these goals through molecular and biochemical studies, and, in collaboration with the Huguenard and Prince labs, through physiological and biosensor based imaging studies to better understand how pharmacological targeting of these molecules will influence neurological disorders.

    A second interest of our lab is to define mechanism underlying the pathology of lysosomal storage disorders. Lysosomes are membrane bound acidic intracellular organelles filled with hydrolytic enzymes that normally function as recycling centers within cells by breaking down damaged cellular macromolecules. Several degenerative diseases designated as lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs) are associated with the accumulation of material within lysosomes. Tay-Sachs disease, Neimann-Pick disease and Gaucher disease are some of the more common LSDs. For reasons that remain incompletely understood, these diseases often affect the nervous system out of proportion to other organs. As a model for LSDs we are studying the lysosomal free sialic acid storage disorders. These diseases are the result of a defect in transport of sialic acid across lysosomal membranes and are associated with mutations in the gene encoding the sialic acid transporter sialin. We are using molecular, genetic and biochemical approaches to better define the normal function of sialin and to determine how loss of sialin function leads to neurodevelopmental defects and neurodegeneration associated with the lysosomal free sialic acid storage disorders.

  • Allan L. Reiss

    Allan L. Reiss

    Howard C. Robbins Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and Professor of Radiology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy laboratory, the Center for Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences Research (CIBSR), focuses on multi-level scientific study of individuals with typical and atypical brain structure and function. Data are obtained from genetic analyses, structural and functional neuroimaging studies, assessment of endocrinological status, neurobehavioral assessment, and analysis of pertinent environmental factors. Our overarching focus is to model how brain disorders arise and to develop disease-specific treatments.

  • Johannes Reiter

    Johannes Reiter

    Assistant Professor of Radiology (Canary Center) and, by courtesy, of Biomedical Data Science
    On Leave from 08/30/2021 To 08/28/2022

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research focuses on the stochastic biological processes underlying cancer evolution with the goal to improve diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment of tumors. I develop computational methods and design mathematical models to generate novel hypotheses and explain observations on a mechanistic level.

  • David A. Relman

    David A. Relman

    Thomas C. and Joan M. Merigan Professor and Professor of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy investigative program focuses on human-microbe interactions and human microbial ecology, and primarily concerns the ecology of human indigenous microbial communities; a secondary interest concerns the classification of humans with systemic infectious diseases, based on features of genome-wide gene transcript abundance patterns and pther aspects of the host response.

  • Anthony Ricci

    Anthony Ricci

    Edward C. and Amy H. Sewall Professor in the School of Medicine and Professor, by courtesy, of Molecular and Cellular Physiology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe auditory sensory cell, the hair cell, detects mechanical stimulation at the atomic level and conveys information regarding frequency and intensity to the brain with high fidelity. Our interests are in identifying specializations associated with mechanotransduction and synaptic transmission leading to the amazing sensitivities of the auditory system. We are also interested in the developmental process, particularly in how development gives insight into repair and regenerative mechanisms.

  • Tawna Roberts, OD, PhD

    Tawna Roberts, OD, PhD

    Assistant Professor of Ophthalmology (Pediatric)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur research efforts are funded by grants from the National Eye Institute, Department of Defense, and various foundations to study vision development in infants and young children as well as binocular vision disorders in adolescents and adults with concussions. Our focus is to identify underlying mechanisms that will inform clinical treatment approaches and ultimately leading to the prevention of strabismus, amblyopia, and binocular vision disorders.

  • William H. Robinson, MD PhD

    William H. Robinson, MD PhD

    James W. Raitt, M.D. Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur lab studies the molecular mechanisms of and develops therapies to treat autoimmune and rheumatic diseases, with a focus on rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, and osteoarthritis.

    The overriding objectives of our laboratory are:

    1. To investigate the mechanisms underlying autoimmune diseases.

    2. To develop diagnostics and therapeutics for autoimmune diseases.

    3. To investigate the role of inflammation in osteoarthritis.

  • Stephen Rock

    Stephen Rock

    Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics

    BioProfessor Rock's research interests include the application of advanced control and modeling techniques for robotic and vehicle systems (aerospace and underwater). He directs the Aerospace Robotics Laboratory in which students are involved in experimental programs designed to extend the state-of-the-art in robotic control. Areas of emphasis include planning and navigation techniques (GPS and vision-based) for autonomous vehicles; aerodynamic modeling and control for aggressive flight systems; underwater remotely-operated vehicle control; precision end-point control of manipulators in the presence of flexibility and uncertainty; and cooperative control of multiple manipulators and multiple robots. Professor Rock teaches several courses in dynamics and control.

  • Stanley G. Rockson, MD

    Stanley G. Rockson, MD

    Allan and Tina Neill Professor of Lymphatic Research and Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy clinical research includes studies on risk factor modification in atherosclerosis and coronary artery disease; clinical trials involving medical therapies for peripheral arterial insufficiency; coronary angiogenesis; therapy of lymphedema; atherand photodynamic therapy in atherosclerosis.

  • Angela Rogers

    Angela Rogers

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Pulmonary and Critical Care)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe use genetics and genomics methodologies to identify novel ARDS pathobiology; we hope that this will enable identification of novel biomarkers, phenotypes, and treatments for the disease. We are building a plasma biobank of critically ill patients at Stanford, with a particular focus on metabolic changes in critical illness.

  • Rajat Rohatgi

    Rajat Rohatgi

    Associate Professor of Biochemistry and of Medicine (Oncology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Intereststhe overall goal of my laboratory is to uncover new regulatory mechanisms in signaling systems, to understand how these mechanisms are damaged in disease states, and to devise new strategies to repair their function.

  • Maria Grazia Roncarolo

    Maria Grazia Roncarolo

    George D. Smith Professor of Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine and Professor of Medicine (Blood and Marrow Transplantation and Cellular Therapy)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch Interests
    Immunetolerance: Mechanisms underlying T-cell tolerance, induction of T-cell anergy and regulatory T cells; Immunomodulation: mAbs, proteins and low molecular weight compounds which can modulate T-cell activation; Primary immunodeficiencies: Characterization of molecular and immunological defects; Gene therapy: Gene transduction of hematopoietic cells for gene therapy in primary immunodeficiencies and metabolic diseases; Hematopoiesis: Mechanisms underlying growth and differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells; Transplantation: Immune reconstitution and T-cell tolerance after allogenic stem cell transplantation; Cytokines/Cytokine receptors: Role in regulation of immune and inflammatory responses

    Clinical Interests
    Primary Immunodeficiencies
    Monogenic Autoimmune Disorders
    Allogenic Bone Marrow Transplantation
    Gene Therapy Clinical Trials
    Cell Therapy Clinical Trials
    Clinical Trials in Autoimmune Diseases and Organ Transplantation
    Clinical Trials in Hemoglobinopathies

  • Lisa Goldman Rosas

    Lisa Goldman Rosas

    Assistant Professor (Research) of Epidemiology and Population Health and of Medicine (Primary Care and Population Health)

    BioLisa Goldman Rosas, PhD MPH is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Epidemiology and Population Health and the Department of Medicine, Division of Primary Care and Population Health at Stanford School of Medicine. An epidemiologist by training, Dr. Goldman Rosas’ research focuses on addressing disparities in chronic diseases such as diabetes, heart disease, depression, and cancer among racial/ethnic minority families. This research features rigorous quantitative and qualitative methodologies, participatory qualitative approaches, and shared leadership with patient and community partners. She is passionate about integrating patients, caregivers, community organizations, and other key stakeholders in the research process in order to affect the greatest improvements in health and well-being. As a reflection of this passion, Dr. Goldman Rosas serves as the Faculty Director for the School of Medicine Office of Community Engagement and the Stanford Cancer Institute Community Outreach and Engagement Program. In these roles, she supports other faculty and patient and community partners to develop sustainable and meaningful partnerships to support transformative research. In addition to research, she teaches at the undergraduate and graduate levels and has a special focus on increasing diversity in biomedical research.

  • Jessica Rose

    Jessica Rose

    Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Rose's research investigates neuromuscular mechanisms underlying cerebral palsy (CP) early brain and motor development in preterm children and . Research examines neonatal microstructural brain development on DTI and physiological correlates of motor function in preterm children. Dr. Rose served on the NIH Taskforce on Childhood Motor Disorders, the AACPDM Research Committee and Steering Committee to develop CDE for CP neuroimaging diagnostics, and serves on the Board of Directors of SBMT.

  • Glenn Rosen

    Glenn Rosen

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine), Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur laboratory examines apoptotic and cell signaling pathways in cancer and lung disease. We are studying signaling pathways that regulate oxidative stress responses and cancer cell growth. Part of these studies focus on analysis of non-canonical transcription regulatory functions of the TERC and Tert components of telomerase in lung disease and cancer.

  • Noah Rosenberg

    Noah Rosenberg

    Stanford Professor of Population Genetics and Society

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsHuman evolutionary genetics, mathematical models in evolution and genetics, mathematical phylogenetics, statistical and computational genetics, theoretical population genetics

  • David Rosenthal

    David Rosenthal

    Professor of Pediatrics (Pediatric Cardiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch interests include the study of Heart Failure, Cardiomyopathy and ventricular dysfunction in children, from a clinical perspective. Investigations include clinical trials of medications, cardiac resynchronization, and mechanical circulatory support.

  • Eben Rosenthal

    Eben Rosenthal

    Professor of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery (OHNS) and of Radiology (Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford)

    BioEben Rosenthal is a surgeon-scientist and academic leader. He is currently serving as the John and Ann Doerr Medical Director of the Stanford Cancer Center, a position he has held since July 2015. He works collaboratively with the Stanford Cancer Institute and Stanford Health Care leaders to set the strategy for the clinical delivery of cancer care across Stanford Medicine and growing cancer networks.

    Before coming to Stanford, he learned his surgical skills in otolaryngology from the University of Michigan and traveled west for further training in facial plastic and reconstructive surgery at the Oregon Health and Science University. He joined the faculty at University of Alabama at Birmingham where he started as an Assistant Professor of Surgery within the Division of Otolaryngology. In 2012, Dr. Rosenthal became Division Director of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery and the holder of the John S. Odess Endowed Chair at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. He moved to Stanford in 2015 to become the Ann and John Doerr Medical Director of the Stanford Cancer Center.

    Dr. Rosenthal is certified by the American Board of Otolaryngology and is a Diplomat of the American Board of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. He specializes in the treatment and reconstruction of head and neck cancer patients. He has a strong interest in development of new strategies to surgically repair complex head and neck defects to improve functional and cosmetic outcomes.

    He has published over 160 peer-reviewed scientific manuscripts, authored many book chapters and published a book on optical imaging in cancer. He is on the editorial board of Head & Neck and The Laryngoscope and is also a charter member of the NIH Developmental Therapeutics Study Section. Dr. Rosenthal has performed preclinical and clinical research on the role of targeted therapies for use to treat cancer alone and in combination with conventional therapy. He has served as principal investigator on several early phase investigator-initiated and industry sponsored clinical trials in molecular oncology. He has received grant funding from the American Cancer Society, NIH/NCI and NIH/NIDCR to study the role of targeted therapy and novel imaging strategies in cancer.

    Dr. Rosenthal has conducted bench to bedside development of optical contrast agents to identify cancer in the operating room. He led a multidisciplinary team of scientists through successful IND application to allow testing of fluorescently labeled antibodies in the clinic and operating room. These early phase clinical trials have demonstrated that this technique can visualize microscopic cancer in the operating room and may significantly improve clinical outcomes.

  • Stephen J. Roth

    Stephen J. Roth

    Professor of Pediatrics (Cardiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsRandomized Therapeutic Trials in Pediatric Heart Disease, NIH/U01 GrantNo. HL68285 2001-2006.
    Heparin and the Reduction of Thrombosis (HART) Study. Pediatric Health Research Fund Award, Stanford Univ Sch of Medicine, 2005-2006.
    A Pilot Trial fo B-type Natriuretic Peptide for Promotion of Urine Output in Diuretic-Resistant Infants Following Cardiovascular Surgery.Pediatric Health Research Fund Award, Stanford Univ Sch of Medicine, 2005-2006.

  • Grant M. Rotskoff

    Grant M. Rotskoff

    Assistant Professor of Chemistry

    BioGrant Rotskoff studies the nonequilibrium dynamics of living matter with a particular focus on self-organization from the molecular to the cellular scale. His work involves developing theoretical and computational tools that can probe and predict the properties of physical systems driven away from equilibrium. Recently, he has focused on characterizing and designing physically accurate machine learning techniques for biophysical modeling. Prior to his current position, Grant was a James S. McDonnell Fellow working at the Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences at New York University. He completed his Ph.D. at the University of California, Berkeley in the Biophysics graduate group supported by an NSF Graduate Research Fellowship. His thesis, which was advised by Phillip Geissler and Gavin Crooks, developed theoretical tools for understanding nonequilibrium control of the small, fluctuating systems, such as those encountered in molecular biophysics. He also worked on coarsegrained models of the hydrophobic effect and self-assembly. Grant received an S.B. in Mathematics from the University of Chicago, where he became interested in biophysics as an undergraduate while working on free energy methods for large-scale molecular dynamics simulations.

    Research Summary

    My research focuses on theoretical and computational approaches to "mesoscale" biophysics. Many of the cellular phenomena that we consider the hallmarks of living systems occur at the scale of hundreds or thousands of proteins. Processes like the self-assembly of organelle-sized structures, the dynamics of cell division, and the transduction of signals from the environment to the machinery of the cell are not macroscopic phenomena—they are the result of a fluctuating, nonequilibrium dynamics. Experimentally probing mesoscale systems remains extremely difficult, though it is continuing to benefit from advances in cryo-electron microscopy and super-resolution imaging, among many other techniques. Predictive and explanatory models that resolve the essential physics at these intermediate scales have the power to both aid and enrich the understanding we are presently deriving from these experimental developments.

    Major parts of my research include:

    1. Dynamics of mesoscale biophysical assembly and response.— Biophysical processes involve chemical gradients and time-dependent external signals. These inherently nonequilibrium stimuli drive supermolecular organization within the cell. We develop models of active assembly processes and protein-membrane interactions as a foundation for the broad goal of characterizing the properties of nonequilibrium biomaterials.

    2. Machine learning and dimensionality reduction for physical models.— Machine learning techniques are rapidly becoming a central statistical tool in all domains of scientific research. We apply machine learning techniques to sampling problems that arise in computational chemistry and develop approaches for systematically coarse-graining physical models. Recently, we have also been exploring reinforcement learning in the context of nonequilibrium control problems.

    3. Methods for nonequilibrium simulation, optimization, and control.— We lack well-established theoretical frameworks for describing nonequilibrium states, even seemingly simple situations in which there are chemical or thermal gradients. Additionally, there are limited tools for predicting the response of nonequilibrium systems to external perturbations, even when the perturbations are small. Both of these problems pose key technical challenges for a theory of active biomaterials. We work on optimal control, nonequilibrium statistical mechanics, and simulation methodology, with a particular interest in developing techniques for importance sampling configurations from nonequilibrium ensembles.

  • Daniel Rubin

    Daniel Rubin

    Professor of Biomedical Data Science and of Radiology (Integrative Biomedical Imaging Informatics at Stanford), of Medicine (Biomedical Informatics Research) and, by courtesy, of Ophthalmology and of Computer Science
    On Leave from 09/01/2021 To 04/30/2022

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research interest is imaging informatics--ways computers can work with images to leverage their rich information content and to help physicians use images to guide personalized care. Work in our lab thus lies at the intersection of biomedical informatics and imaging science.

  • Mirabela Rusu

    Mirabela Rusu

    Assistant Professor of Radiology (Integrative Biomedical Imaging Informatics)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Mirabela Rusu focuses on developing analytic methods for biomedical data integration, with a particular interest in radiology-pathology fusion. Such integrative methods may be applied to create comprehensive multi-scale representations of biomedical processes and pathological conditions, thus enabling their in-depth characterization.

  • Brian Rutt

    Brian Rutt

    Professor of Radiology (Radiological Sciences Lab)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research interests center on MRI research, including high-field and high-resolution MRI technology development as well as applications of advanced MRI techniques to studying the brain, cardiovascular system and cancer.

  • Chiara Sabatti

    Chiara Sabatti

    Professor of Biomedical Data Science and of Statistics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsStatistical models and reasoning are key to our understanding of the genetic basis of human traits. Modern high-throughput technology presents us with new opportunities and challenges. We develop statistical approaches for high dimensional data in the attempt of improving our understanding of the molecular basis of health related traits.

  • Amin Saberi

    Amin Saberi

    Professor of Management Science and Engineering
    On Leave from 10/01/2021 To 03/31/2022

    BioAmin Saberi is an Associate Professor and 3COM faculty scholar in Stanford University. He received his B.Sc. from Sharif University of Technology and his Ph.D. from Georgia Institute of Technology in Computer Science. His research interests include algorithms, approximation algorithms, and algorithmic aspects of games, markets, and networks. Amin Saberi's research is supported by National Science Foundation (under grants CCF 0546889, 0729586, and 0915145), Library of Congress, Stanford Clean Slate Design for the Internet, and Google. His most recent awards include an Alfred Sloan Fellowship and best paper awards in FOCS 2011 and SODA 2010.

  • Debra Safer

    Debra Safer

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (General Psychiatry and Psychology-Adult)
    On Partial Leave from 09/15/2021 To 03/14/2022

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPrimary research interests include the nature and treatment of eating disorders
    (particularly bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder), the development and treatment of obesity, and the development and treatment of problematic eating patterns in patients following bariatric surgery.

  • Marc R. Safran, MD

    Marc R. Safran, MD

    Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Safran’s practice focuses on arthroscopic management of hip problems as well as articular cartilage regeneration, shoulder surgery and athletic shoulder and elbow problems. He is actively involved in research in these areas.

  • Julien Sage

    Julien Sage

    Elaine and John Chambers Professor of Pediatric Cancer and Professor of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe investigate the mechanisms by which normal cells become tumor cells, and we combine genetics, genomics, and proteomics approaches to investigate the differences between the proliferative response in response to injury and the hyperproliferative phenotype of cancer cells and to identify novel therapeutic targets in cancer cells.

  • Manish Saggar

    Manish Saggar

    Assistant Professor (Research) of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Interdisciplinary Brain Science Research)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe overarching goal of my research is to develop reliable computational methods that will allow for characterizing and modeling temporal dynamics of brain activity, without averaging data in either space or time. I firmly believe that the spatiotemporal richness in brain activity might hold the key to finding the person- and disorder-centric biomarkers. I am currently developing methods to model the temporal dynamics of brain activity in individuals with fragile X syndrome and healthy controls.

  • Kathleen M. Sakamoto

    Kathleen M. Sakamoto

    Shelagh Galligan Professor in the School of Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research focuses on the molecular pathways that regulate normal and aberrant blood cell development, including acute leukemia and bone marrow failure syndromes. We are also studying novel drugs for treatment of cancer.

  • Michael Salerno

    Michael Salerno

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular) and of Radiology (Cardiovascular Imaging)

    BioDr. Salerno completed his BS in Biological Engineering at Cornell University, and his MD and PhD in Biomedical Engineering at the University of Virginia as part of the Medical Scientist Training Program. He then completed the American Board of Internal Medicine Research Pathway with an Internal Medicine residency at Stanford University, and his general cardiology fellowship at Duke University Medical Center. During his time at Duke he completed a dedicated year in cardiovascular MRI at the Duke Cardiovascular MR Imaging Center. He returned to UVA in 2008 to complete a 2-year advanced cardiovascular imaging fellowship where he trained in CMR and cardiovascular CTA. He achieved COCATS Level III training in all cardiovascular imaging modalities (Echo, Nuclear, CMR, CCT), and is board certified in Echocardiography and Nuclear Cardiology. He served as faculty at UVA in Cardiology, Radiology, and Biomedical Engineering from 2010-2021 where he was the Director of Cardiac MRI and the Medical Director of Echocardiography, before returning to Stanford.

    His research involves the development and evaluation of novel MRI pulse sequences and techniques to improve the clinical utility of CMR imaging. The current focus of the research is on quantitative myocardial perfusion imaging, quantitative imaging of myocardial fibrosis, rapid free-breathing and self-gated imaging, and deep learning for image reconstruction and post-processing. His laboratory includes undergraduate and graduate engineering students as well as clinical cardiovascular imaging fellows to bring new advances into clinical practice. Dr. Salerno has been in the field of MRI for 25 years and holds multiple patents related to the development and application of novel pulse sequences for MRI. He has received numerous research awards, and has published extensively in the areas of MRI, cardiovascular MRI and multi-modality cardiovascular imaging. His research has been supported by the AHA and the National Institutes of health. He is a deputy editor for JACC Cardiovascular Imaging.

    Outside of work, Dr. Salerno enjoys sailing, rock climbing, skiing, running, biking, hiking, and spending time with his wife Cherie, and his two boys Christopher and Joseph.

  • J Kenneth Salisbury, Jr.

    J Kenneth Salisbury, Jr.

    Professor (Research) of Computer Science and of Surgery (Anatomy), Emeritus

    BioSalisbury worked on the development of the Stanford-JPL Robot Hand, the JPL Force Reflecting Hand Controller, the MIT-WAM arm, and the Black Falcon Surgical Robot. His work with haptic interface technology led to the founding of SensAble Technology, producers of the PHANToM haptic interface and software. He also worked on the development of telerobotic systems for dexterity enhancement in the operating room. His current research focuses on human-machine interaction, cooperative haptics, medical robotics, and surgical simulation.

  • Alberto Salleo

    Alberto Salleo

    Professor of Materials Science and Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsNovel materials and processing techniques for large-area and flexible electronic/photonic devices. Polymeric materials for electronics, bioelectronics, and biosensors. Electrochemical devices for neuromorphic computing. Defects and structure/property studies of polymeric semiconductors, nano-structured and amorphous materials in thin films. Advanced characterization techniques for soft matter.

  • Julia Salzman

    Julia Salzman

    Associate Professor of Biomedical Data Science, of Biochemistry and, by courtesy, of Statistics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCircular RNA regulation and function; computational and experimental approaches

  • Peter L. Santa Maria, MD, PhD

    Peter L. Santa Maria, MD, PhD

    Associate Professor of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery (OHNS)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe study chronic suppurative otitis media, a chronic biofilm infection of the middle ear predominantly involving pseudomonas and staph aureus. We are investigating mechanisms of sensory hearing loss, host microbe interactions and trialling novel therapeutics.

    Our work in tympanic membrane regeneration has entered clinical trials.

    Novel treatments for wound healing in intra oral wounds with potential applications to prevent post tonsillectomy wound healing and oral mucositis.

  • Juan G. Santiago

    Juan G. Santiago

    Charles Lee Powell Foundation Professor
    On Partial Leave from 10/01/2021 To 12/31/2021

    Current Research and Scholarly Interestshttp://microfluidics.stanford.edu/Projects/Projects.html

  • Robert Sapolsky

    Robert Sapolsky

    John A. and Cynthia Fry Gunn Professor and Professor of Neurology and of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsNeuron death, stress, gene therapy

  • Peter Sarnow

    Peter Sarnow

    Professor of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur laboratory studies virus-host interactions with an emphasis microRNA-mediated gene regulation and on translational control. The mechanism by which a liver-specific microRNA regulates hepatitis C virus genome replication is under intense scrutiny. In addition, the mechanism of internal ribosome entry in certain cellular and viral mRNAs and its biological role in growth and development is being investigated.

  • Ansuman Satpathy

    Ansuman Satpathy

    Assistant Professor of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur lab works at the interface of immunology, cancer biology, and genomics to study cellular and molecular mechanisms of the immune response to cancer. In particular, we are leveraging high-throughput genomic technologies to understand the dynamics of the tumor-specific T cell response to cancer antigens and immunotherapies (checkpoint blockade, CAR-T cells, and others). We are also interested in understanding the impact of immuno-editing on the heterogeneity and clonal evolution of cancer.

    We previously developed genome sequencing technologies that enable epigenetic studies in primary human immune cells from patients: 1) 3D enhancer-promoter interaction profiling (Nat Genet, 2017), 2) paired epigenome and T cell receptor (TCR) profiling in single cells (Nat Med, 2018), 3) paired epigenome and CRISPR profiling in single cells (Cell, 2019), and high-throughput single-cell ATAC-seq in droplets (Nature Biotech, 2019). We used these tools to study fundamental principles of the T cell response to cancer immunotherapy (PD-1 blockade) directly in cancer patient samples (Nature Biotech, 2019; Nat Med, 2019).

  • Elizabeth Sattely

    Elizabeth Sattely

    Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering

    BioPlants have an extraordinary capacity to harvest atmospheric CO2 and sunlight for the production of energy-rich biopolymers, clinically used drugs, and other biologically active small molecules. The metabolic pathways that produce these compounds are key to developing sustainable biofuel feedstocks, protecting crops from pathogens, and discovering new natural-product based therapeutics for human disease. These applications motivate us to find new ways to elucidate and engineer plant metabolism. We use a multidisciplinary approach combining chemistry, enzymology, genetics, and metabolomics to tackle problems that include new methods for delignification of lignocellulosic biomass and the engineering of plant antibiotic biosynthesis.

  • Alan F. Schatzberg

    Alan F. Schatzberg

    Kenneth T. Norris, Jr. Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsBiological bases of depressive disorders;, glucocorticoid/dopamine interactions in delusional depression;, pharmacologic treatment of depressive disorders.

  • David Schneider

    David Schneider

    Professor of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe study innate immunity and microbial pathogenesis. We have been studying models for a variety of bacterial infections including: Listeria, Mycobacteria, Salmonella and Streptococcus as well as some fungi, malaria and viruses. Our current focus is to determine how we recover from infections.

  • Mark J. Schnitzer

    Mark J. Schnitzer

    Professor of Biology and of Applied Physics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe goal of our research is to advance experimental paradigms for understanding normal cognitive and disease processes at the level of neural circuits, with emphasis on learning and memory processes. To advance these paradigms, we invent optical brain imaging techniques, several of which have been widely adopted. Our neuroscience studies combine these imaging innovations with behavioral, electrophysiological, optogenetic and computational methods, enabling a holistic approach to brain science.