Bio-X


Showing 851-900 of 994 Results

  • Daniel Spielman

    Daniel Spielman

    Professor of Radiology (Radiological Sciences Lab) and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research interests are in the field of medical imaging, particularly magnetic resonance imaging and in vivo spectroscopy. Current projects include MRI and MRS at high magnetic fields and metabolic imaging using hyperpolarized 13C-labeled MRS.

  • Alfred M. Spormann

    Alfred M. Spormann

    Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering, of Chemical Engineering and, by courtesy, of Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMetabolism of anaerobic microbes in diseases, bioenergy, and bioremediation

  • James Spudich

    James Spudich

    Douglass M. and Nola Leishman Professor of Cardiovascular Disease, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe general research interest of this laboratory is the molecular basis of cell motility, with a current emphasis on power output by the human heart. We have three specific research interests, the molecular basis of energy transduction that leads to ATP-driven myosin movement on actin, the biochemical basis of the regulation of actin and myosin interaction and their assembly states, and the roles these proteins play in vivo, in cell movement, changes in cell shape and muscle contraction.

  • Sheri Spunt

    Sheri Spunt

    Endowed Professor of Pediatric Cancer

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research focuses primarily on the management of children, adolescents, and young adults with soft tissue sarcomas. I also have an interest in developmental therapeutics and late effects of cancer therapy,

  • Randall Stafford

    Randall Stafford

    Professor of Medicine (Stanford Center for Research in Disease Prevention)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsAs Director of the SPRC Program on Prevention Outcomes and Practices, my work focuses on cardiovascular disease treatment and prevention, the adoption of new technology and practices, and patterns of physician practice, particularly medication prescribing. Specific interests include measuring and improving the quality of outpatient care, disparities in health care by race, gender, age and socioeconomic status, and interventions to improve prevention outcomes.

  • Creed Stary

    Creed Stary

    Associate Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine (Adult MSD) and, by courtesy, of Ophthalmology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMechanisms promoting neuronal survival following cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury; utilizing microRNA's to target multiple pathways to promote mitochondrial homeostasis and cell survival; anesthetic neurotoxicity; astrocyte-neuronal interaction

  • Kristan Staudenmayer, MD, MS, FACS

    Kristan Staudenmayer, MD, MS, FACS

    Associate Professor of Surgery (General Surgery)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDefining the Impact of Injuries in the Elderly

  • Tim Stearns

    Tim Stearns

    Professor of Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe use the tools of genetics, microscopy, and biochemistry to understand fundamental questions of cell biology: How are cells organized by the cytoskeleton? How do the centrosome and cilium control cell control cell signaling? How is cell division coordinated with duplication of the centrosome, and what goes wrong in cancer cells defective in this coordination?

  • Gary K. Steinberg, MD, PhD

    Gary K. Steinberg, MD, PhD

    Bernard and Ronni Lacroute-William Randolph Hearst Professor of Neurosurgery and Neurosciences and Professor, by courtesy, of Neurology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur laboratory investigates the pathophysiology and treatment of cerebral ischemia, and methods to restore neurologic function after stroke. Treatment strategies include brain hypothermia, stem cell transplantation and optogenetic stimulation. Our clinical research develops innovative surgical, endovascular and radiosurgical approaches for treating difficult intracranial aneurysms, complex vascular malformations and occlusive disease, including Moyamoya disease, as well as stem cell transplant.

  • Lawrence Steinman, MD

    Lawrence Steinman, MD

    George A. Zimmermann Professor and Professor of Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur laboratory is dedicated to understanding the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases, particularly multiple sclerosis. We have developed several new therapies for autoimmunity, including some in Phase 2 clinical trials, as well as one approved drug, natalizumab. We have developed microarray technology for detecting autoantibodies to myelin proteins and lipids. We employ a diverse range of molecular and celluar approaches to trying to understand multiple sclerosis.

  • Lars Steinmetz

    Lars Steinmetz

    Professor of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe apply diverse genomic approaches to understand how genetic variation affects health and disease by: 1) functional and mechanistic analyses of gene regulation, 2) studies of meiotic recombination and inheritance, 3) analyses of genetic and environmental interactions, and 4) characterization of diseases in human cells and model organisms. We integrate wet lab and computational genomic, transcriptomic, proteomic and metabolic approaches, and develop technologies to enable personalized medicine.

  • David A. Stevens

    David A. Stevens

    Professor of Medicine, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsImmunology and chemotherapy of human fungal diseases, particularly coccidioidomycosis (Valley Fever) in California and aspergillosis, and the parasitic disease, trypanosomiasis.

  • David Stevenson

    David Stevenson

    Professor of Pediatrics (Genetics)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research focuses on disorders of the RAS/MAPK pathway (eg. NF1, Noonan, CFC, and Costello syndrome). I am working on understanding the impact of RAS signaling on the musculoskeletal system. I use genomic approaches to identify somatic events and modifiers in the RASopathies. I am also involved in identifying outcome measures for use in clinical trials for the associated orthopedic manifestations. Other areas of research involve vascular anomalies, Prader-Willi syndrome, and hypophosphatasia.

  • David K. Stevenson, M.D.

    David K. Stevenson, M.D.

    Harold K. Faber Professor of Pediatrics, Senior Associate Dean, Maternal and Child Health and Professor, by courtesy, of Obstetrics and Gynecology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur research is focused on the study of the ontogeny and control of heme catabolism and bilirubin production in the developing neonate. A better understanding of the role of increased bilirubin production in neonatal jaundice and the prevention of hemolytic jaundice has remained an overall objective of our program. We are also study the causes of preterm birth and ways to prevent it.

  • Tanya Stoyanova

    Tanya Stoyanova

    Assistant Professor of Radiology (Cancer Early Detection-Canary Center)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsStoyanova lab develops new early cancer detection methods and therapeutic strategies for late stage cancers. The current research focus is on protein-based biomarkers for early cancer detection as well as development of new small molecule inhibitors and antibody-based therapies for prostate and other epithelial cancers. The ultimate goals of the laboratory are to improve the early diagnosis and prognosis of clinically significant cancers and guide the development of novel and effective therapeutic strategies for metastatic prostate and other epithelial cancers.

  • Aaron F. Straight

    Aaron F. Straight

    Professor of Biochemistry and, by courtesy, of Chemical and Systems Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe study the biology of chromosomes. Our research is focused on understanding how chromosomal domains are specialized for unique functions in chromosome segregation, cell division and cell differentiation. We are particularly interested in the genetic and epigenetic processes that govern vertebrate centromere function, in the organization of the genome in the eukaryotic nucleus and in the roles of RNAs in the regulation of chromosome structure.

  • Thomas Sudhof

    Thomas Sudhof

    Avram Goldstein Professor in the School of Medicine and Professor, by courtesy, of Neurology and of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsInformation transfer at synapses mediates information processing in brain, and is impaired in many brain diseases. Thomas Südhof is interested in how synapses are formed, how presynaptic terminals release neurotransmitters at synapses, and how synapses become dysfunctional in diseases such as autism or Alzheimer's disease. To address these questions, Südhof's laboratory employs approaches ranging from biophysical studies to the electrophysiological and behavioral analyses of mutant mice.

  • Brian Suffoletto

    Brian Suffoletto

    Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Suffoletto is an emergency physician and NIH-funded investigator with a focus on collecting novel forms of longitudinal and remote data to inform temporal risk prediction and inform just-in-time adaptive interventions

  • Edith Vioni Sullivan

    Edith Vioni Sullivan

    Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Major Laboratories and Clinical Translational Neurosciences Incubator)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsApplication of neuroimaging modalities and component process analysis of cognitive, sensory, and motor functions to identify brain structural and functional mechanisms disrupted in diseases affecting the brain: alcohol use disorder, HIV infection, dementia, and normal aging from adolescence to senescence.

  • Yang Sun, MD, PhD

    Yang Sun, MD, PhD

    Associate Professor of Ophthalmology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe are interested in the role of inositol phosphatases in eye development and disease, using both animal models and human disease tissue. We are a translational laboratory seeking to understand the basic function of proteins as well as developing therapeutic strategies for clinical trials.

  • Zijie Sun

    Zijie Sun

    Professor of Urology, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe focus on understanding the molecular mechanism of transcription factors that govern the transformation of normal cells to a neoplastic state. We are especially interested in nuclear hormone action and its interactions with other signaling pathways in tumor development and progression.

  • John B. Sunwoo, MD

    John B. Sunwoo, MD

    Edward C. and Amy H. Sewall Professor in the School of Medicine and Professor, by courtesy, of Dermatology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy laboratory is focused on two primary areas of research: (1) the immune response to head and neck cancer and to a tumorigenic population of cells within these malignancies called cancer stem cells; (2) the developmental programs of a special lymphocyte population involved in innate immunity called natural killer (NK) cells; and (3) intra-tumor and inter-tumor heterogeneity.

  • Trisha Suppes, MD, PhD

    Trisha Suppes, MD, PhD

    Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Public Mental Health and Population Sciences)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsLong-term treatment strategies for bipolar disorder, treatment for bipolar II disorder, use of treatment algorithms, and treatment of major depression.

  • Yuri Suzuki

    Yuri Suzuki

    Professor of Applied Physics and, by courtesy, of Materials Science and Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsHer interests are focused on novel ground states and functional properties in condensed matter systems synthesized via atomically precise thin film deposition techniques with a recent emphasis has been on highly correlated electronic systems:
    • Emergent interfacial electronic & magnetic phenomena through complex oxide heteroepitaxy
    • Low dimensional electron gas systems
    • Spin current generation, propagation and control in complex oxide-based ferromagnets
    • Multifunctional behavior in complex oxide thin films and heterostructures

  • Katrin J Svensson

    Katrin J Svensson

    Assistant Professor of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMolecular metabolism
    Protein biochemistry
    Cell biology and function
    Animal physiology

  • James Swartz

    James Swartz

    James H. Clark Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor of Chemical Engineering and of Bioengineering
    On Leave from 10/01/2022 To 06/30/2023

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsProgram Overview

    The world we enjoy, including the oxygen we breathe, has been beneficially created by biological systems. Consequently, we believe that innovative biotechnologies can also serve to help correct a natural world that non-natural technologies have pushed out of balance. We must work together to provide a sustainable world system capable of equitably improving the lives of over 10 billion people.
    Toward that objective, our program focuses on human health as well as planet health. To address particularly difficult challenges, we seek to synergistically combine: 1) the design and evolution of complex protein-based nanoparticles and enzymatic systems with 2) innovative, uniquely capable cell-free production technologies.
    To advance human health we focus on: a) achieving the 120 year-old dream of producing “magic bullets”; smart nanoparticles that deliver therapeutics or genetic therapies only to specific cells in our bodies; b) precisely designing and efficiently producing vaccines that mimic viruses to stimulate safe and protective immune responses; and c) providing a rapid point-of-care liquid biopsy that will count and harvest circulating tumor cells.
    To address planet health we are pursuing biotechnologies to: a) inexpensively use atmospheric CO2 to produce commodity biochemicals as the basis for a new carbon negative chemical industry, and b) mitigate the intermittency challenges of photovoltaic and wind produced electricity by producing hydrogen either from biomass sugars or directly from sunlight.
    More than 25 years ago, Professor Swartz began his pioneering work to develop cell-free biotechnologies. The new ability to precisely focus biological systems toward efficiently addressing new, “non-natural” objectives has proven tremendously useful as we seek to address the crucial and very difficult challenges listed above. Another critical feature of the program is the courage (or naivete) to approach important objectives that require the development and integration of several necessary-but- not-sufficient technology advances.

  • Karl G. Sylvester

    Karl G. Sylvester

    Professor of Surgery (Pediatric Surgery)
    On Partial Leave from 09/01/2022 To 02/28/2023

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsScholarly interests include investigation of molecular markers of human disease that provide diagnostic function, serve as targets for possible therapeutic manipulation, or provide insight into mechanisms of human disease. Specific diseases of interest include common conditions of pregnancy, gut microbial ecology and Necrotizing Enterocolitis (NEC).

  • Daniel Sze, MD, PhD

    Daniel Sze, MD, PhD

    Professor of Radiology (Interventional Radiology)
    On Leave from 11/23/2022 To 12/22/2022

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsTransarterial administration of chemotherapeutics, radioactive microspheres, and biologics for the treatment of unresectable tumors; management of portal hypertension and complications of cirrhosis (TIPS); treatment of complications of organ transplantation; Venous and pulmonary arterial thrombolysis and reconstruction; Stent and Stent-graft treatment of peripheral vascular diseases, aneurysms, aortic dissections

  • Christopher N. Ta, MD

    Christopher N. Ta, MD

    Professor of Ophthalmology

    BioChristopher N. Ta, MD specializes in the diagnosis and medical treatment of cornea diseases. His areas of expertise are in the treatment of ocular infections, inflammation, dry eyes and ocular surface diseases. He has conducted numerous clinical trials toward the prevention and treatment of ocular infections. Dr. Ta also has extensive clinical experience in the treatment of ocular graft-versus host disease following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

  • William Talbot

    William Talbot

    Professor of Developmental Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe use genetic and cellular approaches to investigate the molecular basis of glial development and myelination in the zebrafish.

  • Hua Tang

    Hua Tang

    Professor of Genetics and, by courtesy, of Statistics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDevelop statistical and computational methods for population genomics analyses; modeling human evolutionary history; genetic association studies in admixed populations.

  • Jean Y. Tang MD PhD

    Jean Y. Tang MD PhD

    Professor of Dermatology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research focuses on 2 main areas:

    1. Skin cancer:
    - New therapeutics to treat and prevent non-melanoma skin cancer, especially by targeting the Hedgehog signaling pathway for BCC tumors
    - Genomic analysis of drug-resistant cancers
    - Identifying risk factors for skin cancer in the Women's Health Initiative

    2. Epidermolysis Bullosa: gene therapy and protein therapy to replace defective/absent Collagen 7 in children and adults with Recessive Dystrophic EB

  • Sindy Tang

    Sindy Tang

    Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment and Professor, by courtesy, of Radiology (Precision Health and Integrated Diagnostics)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe long-term goal of Dr. Tang's research program is to harness mass transport in microfluidic systems to accelerate precision medicine and material design for a future with better health and environmental sustainability.

    Current research areas include: (I) Physics of droplets in microfluidic systems, (II) Interfacial mass transport and self-assembly, and (III) Applications in food allergy, single-cell wound repair, and the bottom-up construction of synthetic cell and tissues in close collaboration with clinicians and biochemists at the Stanford School of Medicine, UCSF, and University of Michigan.

    For details see https://web.stanford.edu/group/tanglab/

  • William Abraham Tarpeh

    William Abraham Tarpeh

    Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering, by courtesy, of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Center Fellow, by courtesy, at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    BioReimagining liquid waste streams as resources can lead to recovery of valuable products and more efficient, less costly approaches to reducing harmful discharges to the environment. Pollutants in effluent streams can be captured and used as valuable inputs to other processes. For example, municipal wastewater contains resources like energy, water, nutrients, and metals. The Tarpeh Lab develops and evaluates novel approaches to resource recovery from “waste” waters at several synergistic scales: molecular mechanisms of chemical transport and transformation; novel unit processes that increase resource efficiency; and systems-level assessments that identify optimization opportunities. We employ understanding of electrochemistry, separations, thermodynamics, kinetics, and reactor design to preferentially recover resources from waste. We leverage these molecular-scale insights to increase the sustainability of engineered processes in terms of energy, environmental impact, and cost.

  • Daniel Tartakovsky

    Daniel Tartakovsky

    Professor of Energy Science Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsEnvironmental fluid mechanics, Applied and computational mathematics, Biomedical modeling.

  • Vivianne Tawfik

    Vivianne Tawfik

    Associate Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine (Adult Pain)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy overall research interest is to understand how the immune system interacts with the nervous system after injury to promote the transition from acute to chronic pain. In my clinical practice I care for patients with persistent pain that often occurs after minor trauma such as fracture or surgery. Using basic science approaches including whole system immune phenotyping with mass cytometry and genetic manipulation of peripheral and central immune cells, we seek to dissect the temporal and tissue-specific contribution of these cells to either promotion or inhibition of healing.

  • Joyce Teng, MD, PhD

    Joyce Teng, MD, PhD

    Professor of Dermatology and, by courtesy, of Pediatrics

    BioJoyce Teng, MD, PhD is a professor in dermatology at Stanford University. She is affiliated with multiple hospitals in the area, including Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital (LPCH) at Stanford and Stanford Hospital and Clinics (SHC). She received her medical degree from Vanderbilt University School of Medicine and has been in practice for more than 12 years. She is one of the 6 pediatric dermatologists practicing at LPCH and one of 72 at SHC who specialize in Dermatology. She sees patients with rare genetic disorders, birthmarks, vascular anomalies and a variety of inflammatory skin diseases. She is also an experienced pediatric dermatological surgeon. Her research interests are drug discovery and novel therapy for skin disorders.

  • Avnesh Thakor

    Avnesh Thakor

    Associate Professor of Radiology (Pediatric Radiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOver the past decade there has been tremendous advances in the field of Interventional Oncology with the clinical utilization of multiple new innovative locoregional therapies (i.e. chemoembolization, percutaneous ablation).

    Looking forward, our ability to super-selectively deliver new therapies directly to target organs. These therapies include nanoparticles, stem cells and gene therapy and will open new pathways into the emerging field of Interventional Regenerative Medicine.

  • Suzanne Tharin

    Suzanne Tharin

    Assistant Professor of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe long-term goal of my research is the repair of damaged corticospinal circuitry. Therapeutic regeneration strategies will be informed by an understanding both of corticospinal motor neuron (CSMN) development and of events occurring in CSMN in the setting of spinal cord injury. MicroRNAs are small, non-coding RNAs that regulate the expression of “suites” of genes. The work in my lab seeks to identify microRNA controls over CSMN development and over the CSMN response to spinal cord injury.

  • Hawa Racine Thiam

    Hawa Racine Thiam

    Assistant Professor of Bioengineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCellular Biophysical Mechanisms of Innate Immune Cells Functions

  • Robert Tibshirani

    Robert Tibshirani

    Professor of Biomedical Data Science and of Statistics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research is in applied statistics and biostatistics. I specialize in computer-intensive methods for regression and classification, bootstrap, cross-validation and statistical inference, and signal and image analysis for medical diagnosis.

  • Alice Ting

    Alice Ting

    Professor of Genetics, of Biology and, by courtesy, of Chemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe develop chemogenetic and optogenetic technologies for probing and manipulating protein networks, cellular RNA, and the function of mitochondria and the mammalian brain. Our technologies draw from enzyme engineering, directed evolution, chemical biology, organic synthesis, high-resolution microscopy, genetics, and computational analysis.

  • Natalie Torok

    Natalie Torok

    Professor of Medicine (Gastroenterology and Hepatology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur laboratory has been focusing on the mechanism of liver fibrosis and the role of hepatocyte cell death in fibrogenic injury. We have demonstrated the intricate link between hepatocyte apoptosis, generation of apoptotic bodies and their efferocytosis by stellate cells triggering fibrogenic activation. Key to this was the activation of the NADPH oxidase NOX2 and production of reactive oxidative species inducing stellate cell transdifferentiation and collagen I transcription. We have expanded our work focusing on the role of non-phagocytic NOX4 in dysregulating insulin responses and precipitating ER and mitochondrial stress signaling in non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. We are particularly interested in clinical conditions that are linked to accelerated fibrosis such as during aging and T2DM. Our other major focus is on alcoholic hepatitis, and defining novel therapeutic targets based on sterile inflammatory pathways. Our ultimate goal is translation and developing new treatment approaches that reverse fibrosis and improve patient outcomes.

  • Philip S. Tsao, PhD

    Philip S. Tsao, PhD

    Professor (Research) of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur primary interests are in the molecular underpinnings of vascular disease as well as assessing disease risk. In addition to targeted investigation of specific signaling molecules, we utilize global genomic analysis to identify gene expression networks and regulatory units. We are particularly interested in the role of microRNAs in gene expression pathways associated with disease.

  • Richard Tsien

    Richard Tsien

    George D. Smith Professor, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe study synaptic communication between brain cells with the goal of understanding neuronal computations and memory mechanisms. Main areas of focus include: presynaptic calcium channels, mechanisms of vesicular fusion and recycling. Modulation of synaptic strength through changes in postsynaptic receptors and dendritic morphology. Signaling that links synaptic activity to nuclear transcription and local protein translation. Techniques include imaging, electrophysiology, molecular biology.

  • Shripad Tuljapurkar

    Shripad Tuljapurkar

    The Dean and Virginia Morrison Professor of Population Studies

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsStochastic dynamics of human and natural populations; prehistoric societies; probability forecasts including sex ratios, mortality, aging and fiscal balance; life history evolution.

  • Minang (Mintu) Turakhia

    Minang (Mintu) Turakhia

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine)
    On Leave from 05/23/2022 To 05/22/2024

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Turakhia has an active clinical research program, with funding from AHA, VA, NIH, the medical device industry, and foundations. His research program aims to improve the treatment of heart rhythm disorders, with an emphasis on atrial fibrillation, by evaluating quality and variation of care, comparative and cost-effectiveness of therapies, and risk prediction. Dr. Turakhia has extensive expertise in using large administrative and claims databases for this work. His TREAT-AF retrospective study of over 500,000 patients with newly-diagnosed AF is the largest known research cohort of AF patients. He has served as study PI or chairman of several prominent single- and multicenter trials in atrial fibrillation, investigational devices for electrophysiology procedures, digital health interventions, and sensor technologies.

    His other research interests include technology assessment of new device-based therapies and the impact of changing health policy and reform on the delivery of arrhythmia care. Dr. Turakhia is a Fellow of the American Heart Association, American College of Cardiology, and Heart Rhythm Society.

  • Alexander Eckehart Urban

    Alexander Eckehart Urban

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Major Laboratories and Clinical Translational Neurosciences Incubator) and of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsComplex behavioral and neuropsychiatric phenotypes often have a strong genetic component. This genetic component is often extremely complex and difficult to dissect. The current revolution in genome technology means that we can avail ourselves to tools that make it possible for the first time to begin understanding the complex genetic and epigenetic interactions at the basis of the human mind.

  • PJ Utz

    PJ Utz

    Professor of Medicine (Immunology and Rheumatology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe long-term research goal of the Utz laboratory is to understand autoimmunity, autoantibodies, and how tolerance is broken and can be reestablished.