Bio-X


Showing 21-30 of 929 Results

  • Ann M. Arvin

    Ann M. Arvin

    Lucile Salter Packard Professor of Pediatrics and Professor of Microbiology and Immunology
    On Partial Leave from 09/01/2019 To 08/31/2021

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur laboratory investigates the pathogenesis of varicella zoster virus (VZV) infection, focusing on the functional roles of particular viral gene products in pathogenesis and virus-cell interactions in differentiated human cells in humans and in Scid-hu mouse models of VZV cell tropisms in vivo, and the immunobiology of VZV infections.

  • Euan A. Ashley

    Euan A. Ashley

    Associate Dean, School of Medicine, Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular), of Genetics, of Biomedical Data Science and, by courtesy, of Pathology at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe Ashley lab is focused on precision medicine. We develop methods for the interpretation of whole genome sequencing data to improve the diagnosis of genetic disease and to personalize the practice of medicine. At the wet bench, we take advantage of cell systems, transgenic models and microsurgical models of disease to prove causality in biological pathways and find targets for therapeutic development.

  • Scott W. Atlas

    Scott W. Atlas

    Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Atlas's investigates the impact of government and the private sector on access, quality, and pricing in health care, both within the US and globally, and the effects of government policies and the changing marketplace on technology-based innovations in medicine. His medical research has centered on advanced applications of new MRI technologies and the key economic issues related to the future of such technology-based advances.

  • Laura Attardi

    Laura Attardi

    Professor of Radiation Oncology (Radiation and Cancer Biology) and of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur research is aimed at defining the pathways of p53-mediated apoptosis and tumor suppression, using a combination of biochemical, cell biological, and mouse genetic approaches. Our strategy is to start by generating hypotheses about p53 mechanisms of action using primary mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs), and then to test them using gene targeting technology in the mouse.

  • Jeffrey Axelrod

    Jeffrey Axelrod

    Professor of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsGenetic and cell biological analyses of signals controlling cell polarity and morphogenesis. Frizzled signaling and cytoskeletal organization.

  • Rosa Bacchetta

    Rosa Bacchetta

    Associate Professor (Research) of Pediatrics (Stem Cell Transplantation)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsIn the coming years, I plan to further determine the genetic and immunological basis of diseases with autoimmunity or immune dysregulation in children. I believe that much can still be learned from the in depth mechanistic studies of pediatric autoimmune diseases. Genomic analysis of the patients' samples has become possible which may provide a rapid indication of altered target molecules. I plan to implement robust functional studies to define the consequences of these genetic abnormalities and bridge them to the patient's clinical phenotype.

    Understanding functional consequences of gene mutations in single case/family first and then validating the molecular and cellular defects in other patients with similar phenotypes, will anticipate and complement cellular and gene therapy strategies.

    For further information please visit the Bacchetta Lab website:
    http://med.stanford.edu/bacchettalab.html

  • Stephen A. Baccus

    Stephen A. Baccus

    Professor of Neurobiology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe study how the neural circuitry of the vertebrate retina encodes visual information and performs computations. To control and measure the retinal circuit, we present visual images while performing simultaneous two-photon imaging and multielectrode recording. We perturb the circuit as it operates using simultaneous intracellular current injection and multielectrode recording, and use the resulting large data sets to construct models of retinal computation.

  • Jeremy Bailenson

    Jeremy Bailenson

    Thomas More Storke Professor, Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment and Professor, by courtesy, of Education

    BioJeremy Bailenson is founding director of Stanford University’s Virtual Human Interaction Lab, Thomas More Storke Professor in the Department of Communication, Professor (by courtesy) of Education, Professor (by courtesy) Program in Symbolic Systems, a Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment, and a Faculty Leader at Stanford’s Center for Longevity. He earned a B.A. cum laude from the University of Michigan in 1994 and a Ph.D. in cognitive psychology from Northwestern University in 1999. He spent four years at the University of California, Santa Barbara as a Post-Doctoral Fellow and then an Assistant Research Professor.

    Bailenson studies the psychology of Virtual and Augmented Reality, in particular how virtual experiences lead to changes in perceptions of self and others. His lab builds and studies systems that allow people to meet in virtual space, and explores the changes in the nature of social interaction. His most recent research focuses on how virtual experiences can transform education, environmental conservation, empathy, and health. He is the recipient of the Dean’s Award for Distinguished Teaching at Stanford.

    He has published more than 100 academic papers, in interdisciplinary journals such as Science, the Journal of the American Medical Association, and PLoS One, as well domain-specific journals in the fields of communication, computer science, education, environmental science, law, marketing, medicine, political science, and psychology. His work has been continuously funded by the National Science Foundation for 15 years.

    Bailenson consults pro bono on Virtual Reality policy for government agencies including the State Department, the US Senate, Congress, the California Supreme Court, the Federal Communication Committee, the U.S. Army, Navy, and Air Force, the Department of Defense, the Department of Energy, the National Research Council, and the National Institutes of Health.

    His first book Infinite Reality, co-authored with Jim Blascovich, was quoted by the U.S. Supreme Court outlining the effects of immersive media. His new book, Experience on Demand, was reviewed by The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, Nature, and The Times of London, and was an Amazon Best-seller.

    He has written opinion pieces for The Washington Post, CNN, PBS NewsHour, Wired, National Geographic, Slate, The San Francisco Chronicle, and The Chronicle of Higher Education, and has produced or directed five Virtual Reality documentary experiences which were official selections at the Tribeca Film Festival. His lab’s research has exhibited publicly at museums and aquariums, including a permanent installation at the San Jose Tech Museum.