Bio-X


Showing 881-900 of 1,054 Results

  • Georgios Skiniotis

    Georgios Skiniotis

    Professor of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, of Structural Biology and of Photon Science

    BioThe Skiniotis laboratory seeks to resolve structural and mechanistic questions underlying biological processes that are central to cellular physiology. Our investigations employ primarily cryo-electron microscopy (cryoEM) and 3D reconstruction techniques complemented by biochemistry, biophysics and simulation methods to obtain a dynamic view into the macromolecular complexes carrying out these processes. The main theme in the lab is the structural biology of cell surface receptors that mediate intracellular signaling and communication. Our current main focus is the exploration of the mechanisms responsible for transmembrane signal instigation in cytokine receptors and G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) complexes.

  • Stephen Skirboll

    Stephen Skirboll

    Associate Professor of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research focuses on screening strategies to identify and characterize cancer stem cells (CSCs) in human gliomas. We are pursuing this in several ways: 1) a novel colony-forming antibody live cell array to identify distinct CSC surface phenotypes, 2) RNAi screens to identify kinases critical for CSC tumorigenicity, 3) high throughput small molecule and chemical screens to identify compounds that selectively kill or target CSCs, and 4) identifying CSCs using the tumor specific EGFRvIII

  • Jan Skotheim

    Jan Skotheim

    Professor of Biology and, by courtesy, of Chemical and Systems Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy overarching goal is to understand how cell growth triggers cell division. Linking growth to division is important because it allows cells to maintain specific size range to best perform their physiological functions. For example, red blood cells must be small enough to flow through small capillaries, whereas macrophages must be large enough to engulf pathogens. In addition to being important for normal cell and tissue physiology, the link between growth and division is misregulated in cancer.

  • Melody Smith, MD, MS

    Melody Smith, MD, MS

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Blood and Marrow Transplantation and Cellular Therapy)

    BioDr. Smith is a board-certified, fellowship-trained medical oncologist and hematologist. She is an assistant professor in the Department of Medicine in the Division of Blood & Marrow Transplantation and Cellular Therapy.

    She is also a physician-scientist who conducts extensive research. As a medical student, she completed a fellowship at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in the Clinical Research Training (now, the Medical Research Scholars) Program. Subsequently, following her clinical fellowship, she was a post-doctoral researcher at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. The research in her lab focuses on investigations of the biology of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells to improve the efficacy and safety of this therapy (1) by investigating donor (Nature Medicine, 2017) and off-the-shelf CAR T cells in mouse models and (2) by assessing mechanisms for the impact of the intestinal microbiome on CAR T cell response (Nature Medicine, 2022).

    Dr. Smith presents the findings of her research at regional, national, and international conferences. Further, she has co-authored articles on topics within the field of cancer immunology, including cancer immunotherapy, stem cell transplantation, and CAR T cell therapy. Her work has appeared in journals, among others Nature, Nature Immunology, Nature Medicine, Blood, and Transplantation and Cellular Therapy. She serves a peer reviewer for publications in journals, such as NEJM Evidence, Science Advances, Blood, Cancer Cell, and Molecular Therapy. She also has contributed to chapters in books, including Pocket Oncology, Current Concepts and Controversies in Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation, and Advanced Concepts in Human Immunology: Prospects for Disease Control.

    She has earned numerous honors; the American Society of Hematology (ASH), the Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer, the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation, and several other professional organizations have recognized her achievements as a clinician, researcher, and scholar.

    Dr. Smith is a member of the ASH Committee on Emerging Gene and Cell Therapies and the ASH Committee on Diversity, Equity & Inclusion. Additionally, she serves on committees within the institution and professional organizations focused on promoting diversity among hematology and cell therapy specialists.

  • Robert Lane Smith

    Robert Lane Smith

    Professor (Research) of Orthopedic Surgery, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur group is interested in the molecular and cell biology underlying bone and cartilage metabolism in health and disease. Normal daily activities are linked to the ability of the articular cartilage to withstand normal joint forces that may reach 5-7 times body weight and bone homeostasis depends on daily mechanical loading histories.

  • Stephen J Smith

    Stephen J Smith

    Professor of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsStephen Smith remains active in the computational microscopy field and is also currently using data science tools to explore new transcriptomic perspectives on signaling by neuropeptides and other neuromodulators in brains of diverse animal species. These exploration have unearthed evidence for a previous unrecognized ubiquity of local neuropeptide signaling and possible critical involvement of such signaling in memory engram formation.

  • Matthew Smuck, MD

    Matthew Smuck, MD

    Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI direct the Wearable Health Lab at Stanford, investigating medical applications of mobile technology to improve musculoskeletal and neurologic disease detection, treatment and prevention.

  • Michael Snyder, Ph.D.

    Michael Snyder, Ph.D.

    Stanford W. Ascherman Professor of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur laboratory use different omics approaches to study a) regulatory networks, b) intra- and inter-species variation which differs primarily at the level of regulatory information c) human health and disease. For the later we have established integrated Personal Omics Profiling (iPOP), an analysis that combines longitudinal analyses of genomic, transcriptomic, proteomic, metabolomic, DNA methylation, microbiome and autoantibody profiles to monitor healthy and disease states

  • Samuel So, MD

    Samuel So, MD

    Lui Hac Minh Professor in the School of Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThrough a 4 pronged comprehensive program: translational and clinical research, early detection and treatment, promoting education, awareness and immunization and building partnership, we are working towards the development of new strategies that will lead to the elimination of hepatitis B worldwide and reduce the threat and incidence of liver cancer. Current research efforts focus on evaluating potential new diagnostic and treatment markers and novel targeted therapy for primary liver cancer.

  • Yuen So, MD, PhD

    Yuen So, MD, PhD

    Professor of Neurology (Adult Neurology)
    On Partial Leave from 02/01/2024 To 08/18/2024

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch in the diagnosis, pathophysiology and treatment of peripheral neuropathy, myasthenia gravis, motor neuron diseases including ALS and SMA, nerve injuries and muscle diseases. Application of clinical neurophysiological methods to neurological diagnosis. Development of evidence-based medicine pertaining to the practice of neurology.

  • Hyongsok Tom  Soh

    Hyongsok Tom Soh

    Professor of Radiology (Early Detection), of Electrical Engineering, of Bioengineering and, by courtesy, of Chemical Engineering

    BioDr. Soh received his B.S. with a double major in Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science with Distinction from Cornell University and his Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from Stanford University. From 1999 to 2003, Dr. Soh served as the technical manager of MEMS Device Research Group at Bell Laboratories and Agere Systems. He was a faculty member at UCSB before joining Stanford in 2015. His current research interests are in analytical biotechnology, especially in high-throughput screening, directed evolution, and integrated biosensors.

  • Olav Solgaard

    Olav Solgaard

    Director, Edward L. Ginzton Laboratory and Robert L. and Audrey S. Hancock Professor in the School of Engineering

    BioThe Solgaard group focus on design and fabrication of nano-photonics and micro-optical systems. We combine photonic crystals, optical meta-materials, silicon photonics, and MEMS, to create efficient and reliable systems for communication, sensing, imaging, and optical manipulation.

  • Edward I. Solomon

    Edward I. Solomon

    Monroe E. Spaght Professor of Chemistry and Professor of Photon Science
    On Leave from 04/01/2024 To 06/30/2024

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsProf. Solomon's work spans physical-inorganic, bioinorganic, and theoretical-inorganic chemistry, focusing on spectroscopic elucidation of the electronic structure of transition metal complexes and its contribution to reactivity. He has advanced our understanding of metal sites involved in electron transfer, copper sites involved in O2 binding, activation and reduction to water, structure/function correlations over non-heme iron enzymes, and correlation of biological to heterogeneous catalysis.

  • Ivan Soltesz

    Ivan Soltesz

    James R. Doty Professor of Neurosurgery and Neurosciences

    BioIvan Soltesz received his doctorate in Budapest and conducted postdoctoral research at universities at Oxford, London, Stanford and Dallas. He established his laboratory at the University of California, Irvine, in 1995. He became full Professor in 2003, and served as department Chair from 2006 to July 2015. He returned to Stanford in 2015 as the James R. Doty Professor of Neurosurgery and Neurosciences at Stanford University School of Medicine. His major research interest is focused on neuronal microcircuits, network oscillations, cannabinoid signaling and the mechanistic bases of circuit dysfunction in epilepsy.
    His laboratory employs a combination of closely integrated experimental and theoretical techniques, including closed-loop in vivo optogenetics, paired patch clamp recordings, in vivo electrophysiological recordings from identified interneurons in awake mice, 2-photon imaging, machine learning-aided 3D video analysis of behavior, video-EEG recordings, behavioral approaches, and large-scale computational modeling methods using supercomputers. He is the author of a book on GABAergic microcircuits (Diversity in the Neuronal Machine, Oxford University Press), and editor of a book on Computational Neuroscience in Epilepsy (Academic Press/Elsevier). He co-founded the first Gordon Research Conference on the Mechanisms of neuronal synchronization and epilepsy, and taught for five years in the Ion Channels Course at Cold Springs Harbor. He has over 30 years of research experience, with over 20 years as a faculty involved in the training of graduate students (total of 16, 6 of them MD/PhDs) and postdoctoral fellows (20), many of whom received fellowship awards, K99 grants, joined prestigious residency programs and became independent faculty.

  • George Somero

    George Somero

    David and Lucile Packard Professor in Marine Science, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe examine two aspects of organism-environment interactions: How does stress from physical (e.g., temperature) and chemical (oxygen levels, pH) factors perturb organisms and how do organisms respond, adaptively, to cope with this stress? We examine evolutionary adaptation and phenotypic acclimatization using a wide variety of marine animals, including Antarctic fishes and invertebrates from intertidal habitats on the coastlines of temperate and tropical seas.

  • Geoffrey Sonn

    Geoffrey Sonn

    Associate Professor of Urology and, by courtesy, of Radiology (Body MRI)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy interest is in improving prostate cancer diagnosis through MRI and image-targeted prostate biopsy. In collaboration with radiologists at Stanford, we are working to define the optimal role of MRI in prostate cancer. We hope to improve cancer imaging to the point that some men with elevated PSA may safely avoid prostate biopsy. For those who need biopsy, we are evaluating novel MRI-US fusion targeted biopsy, a technique that greatly improves upon the conventional biopsy method.

  • Justin L. Sonnenburg

    Justin L. Sonnenburg

    Alex and Susie Algard Endowed Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe goals of the Sonnenburg Lab research program are to (i) elucidate the basic mechanisms that underlie dynamics within the gut microbiota and (ii) devise and implement strategies to prevent and treat disease in humans via the gut microbiota. We investigate the principles that govern gut microbial community function and interaction with the host using a broad range of experimental approaches including studies of microbiomes in diverse human cohorts.