Bio-X


Showing 941-950 of 993 Results

  • Cornelia Weyand

    Cornelia Weyand

    Professor of Medicine (Immunology and Rheumatology), Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsAutoimmunity
    Chronic inflammatory disease
    Metabolic control of immune function

  • Matthew Wheeler

    Matthew Wheeler

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsTranslational research in rare and undiagnosed diseases. Basic and clinical research in cardiomyopathy genetics, mechanisms, screening, and treatment. Investigating novel agents for treatment of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and new mechanisms in heart failure. Cardiovascular screening and genetics in competitive athletes, disease gene discovery in cardiomyopathy and rare disease. Informatics approaches to rare disease and multiomics. Molecular transducers of physical activity bioinformatics.

  • Bernard Widrow

    Bernard Widrow

    Professor of Electrical Engineering, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsProf. Widrow's research focuses on adaptive signal processing, adaptive control systems, adaptive neural networks, human memory, and human-like memory for computers. Applications include signal processing, prediction, noise cancelling, adaptive arrays, control systems, and pattern recognition. Recent work is about human learning at the synaptic level.

  • Leanne Williams

    Leanne Williams

    Vincent V.C. Woo Professor, Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Major Laboratories and Clinical Translational Neurosciences Incubator) and, by courtesy, of Psychology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsA revolution is under way in psychiatry. We can now understand mental illness as an expression of underlying brain circuit disruptions, shaped by experience and genetics. Our lab is defining precision brain circuit biotypes for depression, anxiety and related disorders. We integrate large amounts of brain imaging, behavioral and clinical data and computational approaches. Biotypes are used in personalized intervention studies with selective drugs, neuromodulation and exploratory therapeutics.

  • Nolan Williams

    Nolan Williams

    Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (General Psychiatry and Psychology)

    BioDr. Williams is an Assistant Professor within the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and the Director of the Stanford Brain Stimulation Lab. Dr. Williams has a broad background in clinical neuroscience and is triple board-certified in general neurology, general psychiatry, as well as behavioral neurology & neuropsychiatry. In addition, he has specific training and clinical expertise in the development of brain stimulation methodologies. Themes of his work include (a) examining the use of spaced learning theory in the application of neurostimulation techniques, (b) development and mechanistic understanding of rapid-acting antidepressants, and (c) identifying objective biomarkers that predict neuromodulation responses in treatment-resistant neuropsychiatric conditions. He has published papers in high-impact peer-reviewed journals including Brain, American Journal of Psychiatry, and the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science. Results from his studies have gained widespread attention in journals such as Science and New England Journal of Medicine Journal Watch as well as in the popular press and have been featured in various news sources including Time, Smithsonian, and Newsweek. Dr. Williams received two NARSAD Young Investigator Awards in 2016 and 2018 along with the 2019 Gerald R. Klerman Award. Dr. Williams received the National Institute of Mental Health Biobehavioral Research Award for Innovative New Scientists in 2020.

  • Darrell Wilson

    Darrell Wilson

    Professor of Pediatrics (Endocrinology) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research interests cover a number of areas in Pediatric Endocrinology and Diabetes. I am PI of the Stanford Center for the NIH-funded Type-1 Diabetes TrialNet group. TrialNet conducts clinical trials directed at preventing or delaying the onset of Type 1 diabetes. I am an investigator in DirecNet, another NIH-funded study group, which is devoted to evaluating glucose sensors and the role of technology on the management of diabetes.

  • Virginia Winn

    Virginia Winn

    Associate Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology (Reproductive and Stem Cell Biology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe Winn Laboratory seeks to understand the unique biological mechanisms of human placentation. While the placenta itself is one of the key characteristics for defining mammals, the human placenta is different from most available animal models: it is one of the most invasive placentas, and results in the formation of an organ comprised of cells from both the fetus and the mother. In addition to this fascinating chimerism, fetal cells are deeply involved in the remodeling of the maternal vasculature in order to redirect large volumes of maternal blood to the placenta to support the developing fetus. As such, the investigation of this human organ covers a large array of biological processes, and deals not only with understanding its endocrine function, but the physiologic process of immune tolerance, vascular remodeling, and cellular invasion.

  • Terry Winograd

    Terry Winograd

    Professor of Computer Science, Emeritus

    BioProfessor Winograd's focus is on human-computer interaction design and the design of technologies for development. He directs the teaching programs and HCI research in the Stanford Human-Computer Interaction Group, which recently celebrated it's 20th anniversary. He is also a founding faculty member of the Hasso Plattner Institute of Design at Stanford (the "d.school") and on the faculty of the Center on Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law (CDDRL)

    Winograd was a founding member and past president of Computer Professionals for Social Responsibility. He is on a number of journal editorial boards, including Human Computer Interaction, ACM Transactions on Computer Human Interaction, and Informatica. He has advised a number of companies started by his students, including Google. In 2011 he received the ACM SIGCHI Lifetime Research Award.

  • Monte Winslow

    Monte Winslow

    Associate Professor of Genetics and of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur laboratory uses genome-wide methods to uncover alterations that drive cancer progression and metastasis in genetically-engineered mouse models of human cancers. We combine cell-culture based mechanistic studies with our ability to alter pathways of interest during tumor progression in vivo to better understand each step of metastatic spread and to uncover the therapeutic vulnerabilities of advanced cancer cells.

  • H.-S. Philip Wong

    H.-S. Philip Wong

    Willard R. and Inez Kerr Bell Professor in the School of Engineering

    BioH.-S. Philip Wong is the Willard R. and Inez Kerr Bell Professor in the School of Engineering at Stanford University. He joined Stanford University as Professor of Electrical Engineering in 2004. From 1988 to 2004, he was with the IBM T.J. Watson Research Center. From 2018 to 2020, he was on leave from Stanford and was the Vice President of Corporate Research at TSMC, the largest semiconductor foundry in the world, and since 2020 remains the Chief Scientist of TSMC in a consulting, advisory role.

    He is a Fellow of the IEEE and received the IEEE Electron Devices Society J.J. Ebers Award, the society’s highest honor to recognize outstanding technical contributions to the field of electron devices that have made a lasting impact.

    He is the founding Faculty Co-Director of the Stanford SystemX Alliance – an industrial affiliate program focused on building systems, the faculty director of the Stanford Non-Volatile Memory Technology Research Initiative (NMTRI), and the faculty director of the Stanford Nanofabrication Facility – a shared facility for device fabrication on the Stanford campus that serves academic, industrial, and governmental researchers across the U.S. and around the globe, sponsored in part by the National Science Foundation.