Institute for Human-Centered Artificial Intelligence (HAI)


Showing 181-200 of 259 Results

  • Megan J. Palmer

    Megan J. Palmer

    Adjunct Professor, Bioengineering

    BioDr. Megan J. Palmer is the Executive Director of Bio Policy & Leadership Initiatives at Stanford University. In this role, Dr. Palmer leads integrated research, teaching and engagement programs to explore how biological science and engineering is shaping our societies, and to guide innovation to serve public interests. Based in the Department of Bioengineering, where she is also an Adjunct Professor, she works closely both with groups across the university and with stakeholders in academia, government, industry and civil society around the world.

    In addition to fostering broader efforts, Dr. Palmer leads a focus area in biosecurity in partnership with the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies (FSI) at Stanford. Projects in this area examine how security is conceived and managed as biotechnology becomes increasingly accessible. Her current projects include assessing strategies for governing dual use research, analyzing the diffusion of safety and security norms and practices, and understanding the security implications of alternative technology design decisions.

    Dr. Palmer has created and led many programs aimed at developing and promoting best practices and policies for the responsible development of bioengineering. She currently co-chairs the World Economic Forum Global Future Council on Synthetic Biology and in a member of the Council of the Engineering Biology Research Consortium (EBRC). For the last ten years she has led programs in safety, security and social responsibility for the international Genetically Engineered Machine (iGEM) competition, which in 2019 involved over 6000 students in 353 teams from 48 countries. She also founded and serves as Executive Director of the Synthetic Biology Leadership Excellence Accelerator Program (LEAP), an international fellowship program in biotechnology leadership. She advises and works with many other organizations on their strategies for the responsible development of bioengineering, including serving on the board of directors of Revive & Restore, a nonprofit organization advancing biotechnologies for conservation.

    Previously, Megan was a Senior Research Scholar and William J. Perry Fellow in International Security at the Center for International Security and Cooperation (CISAC), part of FSI, where she is now an affiliated researcher. She also spent five years as Deputy Director of Policy and Practices for the multi-university NSF Synthetic Biology Engineering Research Center (Synberc). She has previously held positions as a project scientist at the California Center for Quantitative Bioscience at the University of California Berkeley (where she was an affiliate of Lawrence Berkeley National Labs), and a postdoctoral scholar in the Bioengineering Department at Stanford University. Dr. Palmer received her Ph.D. in Biological Engineering from M.I.T. and a B.Sc.E. in Engineering Chemistry from Queen’s University, Canada.

  • Jennifer Pan

    Jennifer Pan

    Sir Robert Ho Tung Professor of Chinese Studies, Professor of Communication, Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies and Professor, by courtesy, of Political Science and of Sociology

    BioJennifer Pan is a political scientist whose research focuses on political communication, digital media, and authoritarian politics. She is the Sir Robert Ho Tung Professor of Chinese Studies, Professor of Communication and (by courtesy) Political Science, and a Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute.

    Dr. Pan's research uses experimental and computational methods with large-scale datasets on political activity to answer questions about the role of digital media in authoritarian and democratic politics, including how political censorship, propaganda, and information manipulation work in the digital age and how preferences and behaviors are shaped as a result. Her book, Welfare for Autocrats: How Social Assistance in China Cares for its Rulers (Oxford, 2020) shows how China's pursuit of political order transformed the country’s main social assistance program, Dibao. Her papers have appeared in peer reviewed publications such as the American Political Science Review, American Journal of Political Science, Journal of Politics, Political Communication, and Science.

    She graduated from Princeton University, summa cum laude, and received her Ph.D. from Harvard University’s Department of Government.

  • Vanessa Parli

    Vanessa Parli

    Director of Research Programs, Institute for Human-Centered Artificial Intelligence (HAI)

    BioVanessa Parli is the Director of Research at HAI. She leads the HAI grant programs, research convenings, student groups and “state of AI” reports such as the AI 100 and the AI Index where she is a member of the Steering Committee. Her team also analyzes the effectiveness of these programs to continuously improve HAI’s ability to foster interdisciplinary research collaborations internal and external to Stanford. Prior to Stanford, Vanessa worked in management consulting where she utilized statistics, machine learning and other data science methodologies to advise government agencies, large biotech companies and nonprofit organizations. Vanessa holds an MS in Engineering Management and Computational Mathematics from Johns Hopkins University and a BA in Industrial Engineering from Arizona State University.

  • Marco Pavone

    Marco Pavone

    Associate Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering and of Computer Science

    BioDr. Marco Pavone is an Associate Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics at Stanford University, where he directs the Autonomous Systems Laboratory and the Center for Automotive Research at Stanford. He is also a Distinguished Research Scientist at NVIDIA where he leads autonomous vehicle research. Before joining Stanford, he was a Research Technologist within the Robotics Section at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory. He received a Ph.D. degree in Aeronautics and Astronautics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 2010. His main research interests are in the development of methodologies for the analysis, design, and control of autonomous systems, with an emphasis on self-driving cars, autonomous aerospace vehicles, and future mobility systems. He is a recipient of a number of awards, including a Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers from President Barack Obama, an Office of Naval Research Young Investigator Award, a National Science Foundation Early Career (CAREER) Award, a NASA Early Career Faculty Award, and an Early-Career Spotlight Award from the Robotics Science and Systems Foundation. He was identified by the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) as one of America's 20 most highly promising investigators under the age of 40. His work has been recognized with best paper nominations or awards at a number of venues, including the European Conference on Computer Vision, the IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, the European Control Conference, the IEEE International Conference on Intelligent Transportation Systems, the Field and Service Robotics Conference, the Robotics: Science and Systems Conference, and the INFORMS Annual Meeting.

  • Roy Pea

    Roy Pea

    Director, H-STAR, David Jacks Professor of Education and Professor, by courtesy, of Computer Science

    Current Research and Scholarly Interestslearning sciences focus on advancing theories, research, tools and social practices of technology-enhanced learning of complex domains

  • Kaci Danae Peel

    Kaci Danae Peel

    Events Manager, Institute for Human-Centered Artificial Intelligence (HAI)

    Current Role at StanfordEvent Planner, Stanford Institute for Human-Centered AI (HAI)

  • VJ Periyakoil, Professor of Medicine

    VJ Periyakoil, Professor of Medicine

    Professor of Medicine (Primary Care and Population Health)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research focuses on the intersection of biological, psychosocial and cultural aspects of care of persons with chronic and serious illnesses including dementia.

  • Kilian M Pohl

    Kilian M Pohl

    Professor (Research) of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Major Labs and Incubator) and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe foundation of the laboratory of Associate Professor Kilian M. Pohl, PhD, is computational science aimed at identifying biomedical phenotypes improving the mechanistic understanding, diagnosis, and treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders. The biomedical phenotypes are discovered by unbiased, machine learning-based searches across biological, neuroimaging, and neuropsychological data. This data-driven discovery currently supports the adolescent brain research of the NIH-funded National Consortium on Alcohol and NeuroDevelopment in Adolescence (NCANDA) and the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD), the largest long-term study of brain development and child health in the US. The laboratory also investigates brain patterns specific to alcohol use disorder and the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) across the adult age range, and have advanced the understanding of a variety of brain diseases including schizophrenia, Alzheimer’s disease, glioma, and aging.

  • Christine Raval

    Christine Raval

    Research Program Manager, Institute for Human-Centered Artificial Intelligence (HAI)

    BioChristine is a member of the research team at the Stanford Institute for Human-Centered AI (HAI). She manages the HAI grant programs, student affinity initiative, and the operations of AI100, a 100-year effort to study and anticipate how the effects of AI will ripple through every aspect of how people work, live and play. Prior to joining Stanford, Christine worked on the digital learning team at the University of Nebraska at Omaha and as a case manager for newly arrived refugees in Omaha. Christine graduated with a Master of Public Administration from the University of Nebraska at Omaha and a BA in Justice and Society from Creighton University.

  • Christopher Re

    Christopher Re

    Associate Professor of Computer Science
    On Leave from 04/01/2024 To 06/30/2024

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsAlgorithms, systems, and theory for the next generation of data processing and data analytics systems.

  • Rob Reich

    Rob Reich

    McGregor-Girand Professor of Social Ethics of Science and Technology, Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for HAI, Professor, by courtesy, of Education, of Philosophy and Senior Fellow, by courtesy, at FSI
    On Leave from 10/01/2023 To 06/30/2024

    BioRob Reich is professor of political science and, by courtesy, professor of philosophy and at the Graduate School of Education. He is a co-director of the Center on Philanthropy and Civil Society (publisher of the Stanford Social Innovation Review), and associate director of the Institute for Human-Centered Artificial Intelligence. He was faculty director at the Center for Ethics in Society for eight years, and he continues to lead its ethics and technology initiatives.

    His scholarship in political theory engages with the work of social scientists and engineers. His newest work is on ethics and AI. His most recent books are System Error: Where Big Tech Went Wrong and How We Can Reboot (with Mehran Sahami and Jeremy M. Weinstein, HarperCollins 2021) and Digital Technology and Democratic Theory (edited with Lucy Bernholz and Hélène Landemore, University of Chicago Press 2021). He has also written widely about philanthropy, including Just Giving: Why Philanthropy is Failing Democracy and How It Can Do Better (Princeton University Press, 2018) and Philanthropy in Democratic Societies: History, Institutions, Values (edited with Chiara Cordelli and Lucy Bernholz, University of Chicago Press, 2016). His early work is focused on democracy and education, including Bridging Liberalism and Multiculturalism in American Education (University of Chicago Press, 2002) and Education, Justice, and Democracy (edited with Danielle Allen, University of Chicago Press, 2013). He has written for the New York Times, Washington Post, Wired, The Guardian, and the Stanford Social Innovation Review.

    Rob is the recipient of multiple teaching awards, including the Walter J. Gores award, Stanford’s highest honor for teaching. He was a sixth grade teacher at Rusk Elementary School in Houston, Texas before attending graduate school. He is a board member of the magazine Boston Review, of Giving Tuesday, and at the Spencer Foundation.

  • Thomas Robinson

    Thomas Robinson

    The Irving Schulman, M.D. Professor of Child Health, Professor of Medicine (Stanford Prevention Research Center) and, by courtesy, of Epidemiology and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Robinson originated the solution-oriented research paradigm and directs the Stanford Solutions Science Lab. He is known for his pioneering obesity prevention and treatment research, including the concept of stealth interventions. His research applies social cognitive models of behavior change to behavioral, social, environmental and policy interventions for children and families in real world settings, making the results relevant for informing clinical and public health practice and policy.

  • Fatima Rodriguez

    Fatima Rodriguez

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine)

    BioFatima Rodriguez, MD, MPH is an Associate Professor in Cardiovascular Medicine and (by courtesy) the Stanford Prevention Research Center. Dr. Rodriguez earned her medical degree from Harvard Medical School and her MPH from the Harvard School of Public Health. She then completed internal medicine residency at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and fellowship in cardiovascular medicine at Stanford University. She currently serves as the Section Chief of Preventive Cardiology. Dr. Rodriguez specializes in cardiovascular disease prevention, inherited lipid disorders, and cardiovascular risk assessment in high-risk populations.

    Dr. Rodriguez’s research includes a range of topics around racial, ethnic, and gender disparities in cardiovascular disease prevention, developing novel interventions to address disparities, and opportunistic screening of coronary artery disease.

  • Daniel Rubin

    Daniel Rubin

    Professor of Biomedical Data Science, of Radiology (Integrative Biomedical Imaging Informatics at Stanford), of Medicine (Biomedical Informatics Research) and, by courtesy, of Ophthalmology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research interest is imaging informatics--ways computers can work with images to leverage their rich information content and to help physicians use images to guide personalized care. Work in our lab thus lies at the intersection of biomedical informatics and imaging science.

  • Ahmad Rushdi

    Ahmad Rushdi

    Senior Manager of Research Collaborations, Institute for Human-Centered Artificial Intelligence (HAI)

    BioAhmad A. Rushdi is a Sr. Research Manager at the Stanford Institute for Human-Centered AI (HAI). He works with the diverse machine learning, deep learning, and artificial intelligence communities across Stanford and the corporate world, in order to envision, build, and maintain new bridges around cutting-edge research that would create useful and trusted systems for a variety of AI applications.

    Dr. Rushdi's research interests include statistical signal processing and uncertainty quantification methods applied to machine learning models trained on time-series and real/synthetic image datasets. His publications span system design, communications, genomics, meshing, and national security applications.

    Prior to joining Stanford, Ahmad was a research scientist at the Center for Computing Research of Sandia National Laboratories, an R&D manager of data science at Northrop Grumman Corporation, a research fellow at the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering of UC Davis and the Computational Visualization Center under Oden Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences at UT Austin, and an R&D engineer at Cisco Systems.

    Ahmad holds a PhD in Electrical and Computer Engineering from the University of California, Davis, and MSc/BSc degrees in Electrical Engineering from Cairo University.