Institute for Human-Centered Artificial Intelligence (HAI)


Showing 41-50 of 239 Results

  • Geoffrey Cohen

    Geoffrey Cohen

    James G. March Professor of Organizational Studies in Education and Business, Professor of Psychology and, by courtesy, of Organizational Behavior at the Graduate School of Business
    On Leave from 09/01/2022 To 06/30/2023

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMuch of my research examines processes related to identity maintenance and their implications for social problems. One primary aim of my research is the development of theory-driven, rigorously tested intervention strategies that further our understanding of the processes underpinning social problems and that offer solutions to alleviate them. Two key questions lie at the core of my research: “Given that a problem exists, what are its underlying processes?” And, “Once identified, how can these processes be overcome?” One reason for this interest in intervention is my belief that a useful way to understand psychological processes and social systems is to try to change them. We also are interested in how and when seemingly brief interventions, attuned to underlying psychological processes, produce large and long-lasting psychological and behavioral change.

    The methods that my lab uses include laboratory experiments, longitudinal studies, content analyses, and randomized field experiments. One specific area of research addresses the effects of group identity on achievement, with a focus on under-performance and racial and gender achievement gaps. Additional research programs address hiring discrimination, the psychology of closed-mindedness and inter-group conflict, and psychological processes underlying anti-social and health-risk behavior.

  • Nicholas Alvaro Coles

    Nicholas Alvaro Coles

    Research Scientist

    BioI am a Research Scientist at Stanford University and the Director of the Psychological Science Accelerator. I conduct research in affective science, cross-cultural psychology, and meta-science.

    In affective science, I seek to understand the social, cognitive, and physiological processes that underlie emotion. Much of my research here has focused on the facial feedback hypothesis, the idea that sensorimotor feedback from facial expressions can impact emotional processes (e.g., that smiling can make people feel happy).

    In meta-science, I seek to build research infrastructure that allows researchers to obtain generalizable knowledge about psychological phenomenon. In this domain, I direct the Psychological Science Accelerator: a globally distributed consortium of researchers who pool intellectual and material resources to accelerate the accumulation of generalizable knowledge in psychology.

  • Steven Hartley Collins

    Steven Hartley Collins

    Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering

    BioSteve Collins is an Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering at Stanford University, where he teaches courses on design and robotics and directs the Stanford Biomechatronics Laboratory. His primary focus is to speed and systematize the design and prescription of prostheses and exoskeletons using versatile device emulator hardware and human-in-the-loop optimization algorithms (Zhang et al. 2017, Science). Another interest is efficient autonomous devices, such as highly energy-efficient walking robots (Collins et al. 2005, Science) and exoskeletons that use no energy yet reduce the metabolic energy cost of human walking (Collins et al. 2015, Nature).

    Prof. Collins received his B.S. in Mechanical Engineering in 2002 from Cornell University, where he performed undergraduate research on passive dynamic walking robots. He received his Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering in 2008 from the University of Michigan, where he performed research on the dynamics and control of human walking. He performed postdoctoral research on humanoid robots at T. U. Delft in the Netherlands. He was a professor of Mechanical Engineering and Robotics at Carnegie Mellon University for seven years. In 2017, he joined the faculty of Mechanical Engineering at Stanford University.

    Prof. Collins is a member of the Scientific Board of Dynamic Walking and the Editorial Board of Science Robotics. He has received the Young Scientist Award from the American Society of Biomechanics, the Best Medical Devices Paper from the International Conference on Robotics and Automation, and the student-voted Professor of the Year in his department.

  • Steven Crane

    Steven Crane

    Social Science Research Scholar

    BioI teach and do research across a variety of fields and work with teams to coordinate projects across academia and industry. I intend to study, share, and practice the principles of life that lead to greater wisdom, peace, and prosocial engagement in the world.

    Born in Arizona in 1988, I received a BA in Human Biology (with a concentration in the Psychology and Philosophy of Successful Aging) from Stanford University in 2012 and an MS in Community Health and Prevention Research from Stanford Medicine in 2019. As a speaker, teacher, and writer, I cover topics ranging from biology and psychology to behavior design, human nature, and the future of biotechnology. As a consultant and interdisciplinary research scholar, I study human behavior (especially screen time), biotechnological ethics, social connectedness, public health, and human flourishing.

    See more on my personal website: https://stevencrane.me/ or our Stanford project website at https://boundariesofhumanity.stanford.edu/

  • Gary Darmstadt

    Gary Darmstadt

    Professor (Teaching) of Pediatrics (Neonatology) and, by courtesy, of Obstetrics and Gynecology
    On Partial Leave from 01/03/2022 To 11/30/2022

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI have extensive experience in the development of global health innovations and in working to test and scale-up health interventions. At Stanford University, I am playing a leading role in developing global women and children’s health research and educational programs, including the establishment of a Global Center for Gender Equality at Stanford University. My research focuses on advancing child health and development in low resource settings and advancing gender equality and health globally, and includes several applications of artificial intelligence. Before joining Stanford, I was Senior Fellow at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF), where I led the development of initiatives to address gender inequalities and empower women and girls. Prior to this role, I served as the BMGF Director of Family Health, leading strategy development and implementation across maternal, newborn and child health, nutrition, and family planning. In this role, I was responsible for investments ranging from scientific discovery to intervention development and delivery of interventions at scale. I worked closely with the Discovery team to shape discovery and development investments and was a co-founder of the Saving Lives at Birth Development Grand Challenge, the Putting Women and Girls at the Center of Development Grand Challenge, and the Healthy Birth, Growth and Development initiative. Based on these experiences, I understand how to identify knowledge gaps and generate evidence of impact for new interventions, and how to utilize evidence to influence the policy dialogue leading to programmatic adoption and scale-up of interventions in low income settings. As Director of Family Health, I also co-led the development and implementation of the BMGF global health strategy for India, which cuts across multiple health and development sectors. Before joining BMGF, I was Associate Professor and Founding Director of the International Center for Advancing Neonatal Health in the Department of International Health at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. I led the development of newborn health research, including numerous facility- and community-based maternal and child health research trials. Before joining Johns Hopkins, I was Senior Research Advisor for the $50M Saving Newborn Lives program of Save the Children-US, where I led the development and implementation of the global research strategy for newborn health and survival.

  • Giulio De Leo

    Giulio De Leo

    Professor of Oceans, of Earth System Science, Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment and Professor, by courtesy of Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI am a theoretical ecologist mostly interested in investigating factors and processes driving the dynamics of natural and harvested populations and on how to use this knowledge to inform practical management. I have worked broadly on life histories analysis, fishery management, dynamics and control of infectious diseases and environmental impact assessment.

  • Larry Diamond

    Larry Diamond

    Mosbacher Senior Fellow of Global Democracy at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies, Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution and Professor, by courtesy, of Sociology and of Political Science

    Current Research and Scholarly Interestsdemocratic development and regime change; U.S. foreign policy affecting democracy abroad; comparative trends in the quality and stability of democracy in developing countries and postcommunist states; and public opinion in new democracies, especially in East Asia

  • Ron Dror

    Ron Dror

    Associate Professor of Computer Science and, by courtesy, of Molecular and Cellular Physiology and of Structural Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy lab’s research focuses on computational biology, with an emphasis on 3D molecular structure. We combine two approaches: (1) Bottom-up: given the basic physics governing atomic interactions, use simulations to predict molecular behavior; (2) Top-down: given experimental data, use machine learning to predict molecular structures and properties. We collaborate closely with experimentalists and apply our methods to the discovery of safer, more effective drugs.