Wu Tsai Human Performance Alliance


Showing 51-100 of 276 Results

  • David N. Cornfield

    David N. Cornfield

    Anne T. and Robert M. Bass Professor of Pediatric Pulmonary Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOver the past 20 years, the Cornfield Laboratory has focused upon basic, translational and clinical research, with a primary focus on lung biology. As an active clinician-scientist, delivering care to acutely and chronically ill infants and children, our lab focuses on significant clinical challenges and tried to use science to craft novel solutions to difficult clinical problems.

  • Alia Crum

    Alia Crum

    Associate Professor of Psychology and, by courtesy, of Medicine (Primary Care & Population Health)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur lab focuses on how subjective mindsets (e.g., thoughts, beliefs and expectations) can alter objective reality through behavioral, psychological, and physiological mechanisms. We are interested in understanding how mindsets affect important outcomes both within and beyond the realm of medicine, in the domains such as exercise, diet and stress. https://mbl.stanford.edu/

  • Francesco Nandkumar Dandekar

    Francesco Nandkumar Dandekar

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    BioDr. Dandekar is the Associate Director of Sports Psychiatry and a Clinical Assistant Professor at Stanford University. After graduating summa cum laude from the University of Southern California with a B.S. in Biomedical Engineering, he earned a Regents Scholarship to complete his M.D. at UC San Diego, where he received the American Academy of Neurology’s Prize for Excellence. During his residency and fellowship at Stanford, Dr. Dandekar provided care to a variety of patients utilizing a combination of medication management, psychotherapy, and lifestyle changes (sleep, nutrition, exercise, recovery). Teamed with Clinical Professor Dr. Douglas Noordsy, he helped to incorporate psychiatric services into Stanford's sports psychology program, and continues to see elite athletes as part of the Stanford Sports Psychiatry Clinic. He also specializes in treating physicians, and sees many residents, fellows, and attendings in his private practice. In his free time, he enjoys playing tennis, chess, and guitar.

  • Bruce Daniel

    Bruce Daniel

    Professor of Radiology (Body Imaging) and, by courtesy, of Bioengineering

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests1. MRI of Breast Cancer, particularly new techniques. Currently being explored are techniques including ultra high spatial resolution MRI and contrast-agent-free detection of breast tumors.

    2. MRI-guided interventions, especially MRI-compatible remote manipulation and haptics

    3. Medical Mixed Reality. Currently being explored are methods of fusing patients and their images to potentially improve breast conserving surgery, and other conditions.

  • Beth Darnall

    Beth Darnall

    Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine (Adult Pain) and, by courtesy, of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (General Psychiatry & Psychology (Adult))

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe Stanford Pain Relief Innovations Lab is dedicated to better characterizing and treating pain with patient-centered solutions. We specialize in the conduct of large-scale acute and chronic pain clinical trials that aim to (1) expand and scale access to behavioral medicine via digital and brief treatments; (2) reduce opioid risks via reduction for some and improved opioid access for others; (3) equip healthcare providers with brief behavioral medicine interventions to optimize health outcomes.

  • Reinhold Dauskardt

    Reinhold Dauskardt

    Ruth G. and William K. Bowes Professor in the School of Engineering

    BioDauskardt and his group have worked extensively on integrating new materials into emerging technologies including thin-film structures for nanoscience and energy technologies, high-performance composite and laminates for aerospace, and on biomaterials and soft tissues in bioengineering. His group has pioneered methods for characterizing adhesion and cohesion of thin films used extensively in device technologies. His research on wound healing has concentrated on establishing a biomechanics framework to quantify the mechanical stresses and biologic responses in healing wounds and define how the mechanical environment affects scar formation. Experimental studies are complimented with a range of multiscale computational capabilities. His research includes interaction with researchers nationally and internationally in academia, industry, and clinical practice.

  • John W. Day, MD, PhD

    John W. Day, MD, PhD

    Professor of Neurology (Adult Neurology), of Pediatrics (Genetics) and, by courtesy, of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur Neuromuscular Division coordinates a comprehensive effort to conquer peripheral nerve and muscle disorders, including the muscular dystrophies, motor neuron disorders, neuromuscular junction abnormalities, and peripheral neuropathies. With patients and families foremost in mind, we have had success defining and combating these diseases, with research focused on identifying genetic causes, developing novel treatment, and maximizing patient function by optimizing current management.

  • Luis de Lecea

    Luis de Lecea

    Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Major Laboratories and Clinical and Translational Neurosciences Incubator)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy lab uses molecular, optogenetic, anatomical and behavioral methods to identify and manipulate the neuronal circuits underlying brain arousal, with particular attention to sleep and wakefulness transitions. We are also interested in the changes that occur in neuronal circuits in conditions of hyperarousal such as stress and drug addiction.

  • Karl Deisseroth

    Karl Deisseroth

    D. H. Chen Professor, Professor of Bioengineering and of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsKarl Deisseroth's laboratory created and developed optogenetics, hydrogel-tissue chemistry (beginning with CLARITY), and a broad range of enabling methods. He also has employed his technologies to discover the neural cell types and connections that cause adaptive and maladaptive behaviors.

  • Scott L. Delp, Ph.D.

    Scott L. Delp, Ph.D.

    Director, Wu Tsai Human Performance Alliance at Stanford, James H. Clark Professor in the School of Engineering, Professor of Bioengineering, of Mechanical Engineering and, by courtesy, of Orthopaedic Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsExperimental and computational approaches to study human movement. Development of biomechanical models to analyze muscle function, study movement abnormalities, design medical products, and guide surgery. Imaging and health technology development. Discovering the principles of peak performance to advance human health. Human performance research. Wearable technologies, video motion capture, and machine learning to enable large-scale analysis.

  • Joseph M. DeSimone

    Joseph M. DeSimone

    Sanjiv Sam Gambhir Professor of Translational Medicine, Professor of Chemical Engineering and, by courtesy, of Chemistry, of Materials Science and Engineering, and of Operations, Information and Technology at the Graduate School of Business

    BioJoseph M. DeSimone is the Sanjiv Sam Gambhir Professor of Translational Medicine and Chemical Engineering at Stanford University. He holds appointments in the Departments of Radiology and Chemical Engineering with courtesy appointments in the Department of Chemistry and in Stanford’s Graduate School of Business.

    The DeSimone laboratory's research efforts are focused on developing innovative, interdisciplinary solutions to complex problems centered around advanced polymer 3D fabrication methods. In Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, the lab is pursuing new capabilities in digital 3D printing, as well as the synthesis of new polymers for use in advanced additive technologies. In Translational Medicine, research is focused on exploiting 3D digital fabrication tools to engineer new vaccine platforms, enhanced drug delivery approaches, and improved medical devices for numerous conditions, with a current major focus in pediatrics. Complementing these research areas, the DeSimone group has a third focus in Entrepreneurship, Digital Transformation, and Manufacturing.

    Before joining Stanford in 2020, DeSimone was a professor of chemistry at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and of chemical engineering at North Carolina State University. He is also Co-founder, Board Chair, and former CEO (2014 - 2019) of the additive manufacturing company, Carbon. DeSimone is responsible for numerous breakthroughs in his career in areas including green chemistry, medical devices, nanomedicine, and 3D printing. He has published over 350 scientific articles and is a named inventor on over 200 issued patents. Additionally, he has mentored 80 students through Ph.D. completion in his career, half of whom are women and members of underrepresented groups in STEM.

    In 2016 DeSimone was recognized by President Barack Obama with the National Medal of Technology and Innovation, the highest U.S. honor for achievement and leadership in advancing technological progress. He has received numerous other major awards in his career, including the U.S. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge Award (1997); the American Chemical Society Award for Creative Invention (2005); the Lemelson-MIT Prize (2008); the NIH Director’s Pioneer Award (2009); the AAAS Mentor Award (2010); the Heinz Award for Technology, the Economy and Employment (2017); the Wilhelm Exner Medal (2019); the EY Entrepreneur of the Year Award (2019 U.S. Overall National Winner); and the Harvey Prize in Science and Technology (2020). He is one of only 25 individuals elected to all three branches of the U.S. National Academies (Sciences, Medicine, Engineering). DeSimone received his B.S. in Chemistry in 1986 from Ursinus College and his Ph.D. in Chemistry in 1990 from Virginia Tech.

  • Amy D. Dobberfuhl, MD, MS

    Amy D. Dobberfuhl, MD, MS

    Assistant Professor of Urology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Dobberfuhl's current clinical practice includes: Pelvic Reconstruction, Neurourology, and Voiding Dysfunction.

  • Joseph P. Donahue

    Joseph P. Donahue

    Clinical Associate Professor, Orthopaedic Surgery

    BioDr. Donahue is a Board Certified Orthopaedic Surgeon with Subspecialty Certification in Orthopaedic Sports Medicine. He is fellowship trained and specializes in Arthroscopic and Minimally Invasive Reconstructive Surgery of the Shoulder and Knee, and Sports Medicine.

    Dr. Donahue received his undergraduate degree from Stanford University and his Doctor of Medicine from Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons. He completed his residency in Orthopedic Surgery at St. Luke’s-Roosevelt Hospital Center (NYC), Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (NYC), and the Alfred I. duPont Institute (DE), and went on to a fellowship in Orthopedic Sports Medicine at the Stanford/SOAR Sports Medicine Fellowship Program.

    Dr. Donahue’s interests include arthroscopic surgery of the shoulder and knee. He specializes in anterior cruciate ligament injuries, shoulder instability, and rotator cuff tears. He has done research on both shoulder instability and rotator cuff tears and has developed new techniques and medical devices for rotator cuff and all soft tissue repairs. He has started and actively serves on the medical advisory board for several surgical device companies and continues to design new surgical devices for arthroscopic procedures. He has authored several device patents and journal articles.

    Dr. Donahue has been a member of the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons and a Diplomat of the American Board of Orthopedic Surgery. He is also member of the Arthroscopy Association of North America, the American Orthopedic Society of Sports Medicine, the California Orthopedic Association, The International Knee Society, the California Medical Association, and the Santa Clara Medical Society.

    Dr. Donahue has served as the Program Director of the SOAR Orthopedic Sports Medicine Fellowship Program. He has served as the Director of Santa Clara University’s Sports Medicine Program and the Head Team Physician for all of Santa Clara University’s athletic teams, a team physician for the San Francisco 49ers, the San Francisco Giants, the Stanford Athletic Department, and many other area collegiate and high school teams.

  • Alfredo Dubra, PhD

    Alfredo Dubra, PhD

    Professor of Ophthalmology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur lab seeks to help the early diagnosing and monitoring progression of ocular, vascular, neurodegenerative and systemic diseases through novel non-invasive optical ophthalmic imaging. We pursue this goal through a multidisciplinary approach that integrates optics, computer science, vision science, electrical engineering and other engineering disciplines.

  • Carol Dweck

    Carol Dweck

    Lewis and Virginia Eaton Professor and Professor, by courtesy, of Education

    BioMy work bridges developmental psychology, social psychology, and personality psychology, and examines the self-conceptions people use to structure the self and guide their behavior. My research looks at the origins of these self-conceptions, their role in motivation and self-regulation, and their impact on achievement and interpersonal processes.

  • Johannes C. Eichstaedt

    Johannes C. Eichstaedt

    Assistant Professor (Research) of Psychology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWell-being: affect, life satisfaction, and purpose, and their individual and societal determinants (lifestyle factors and policies); traits: character strengths, personality, trust, and empathy

    Mental and physical health: depression, stress, and anxiety; health psychology: heart disease and opioid addiction

    Methods: Natural Language Processing & Large Language Models; data science and
    visualization; longitudinal methods, machine learning, and psychological assessment through AI

  • Antoine Falisse

    Antoine Falisse

    Research Engineer

    BioDr. Falisse is a postdoctoral fellow in Bioengineering working on computational approaches to study human movement disorders. He primarily uses optimization methods, biomechanical modeling, and data from various sources (wearables, videos, medical images) to get insights into movement abnormalities and design innovative treatments and rehabilitation protocols.

    Dr. Falisse received his PhD from KU Leuven (Belgium) where he worked on modeling and simulating the locomotion of children with cerebral palsy. His research was supported by the Research Foundation Flanders (FWO) through a personal fellowship. Dr. Falisse received several awards for his PhD work, including the David Winter Young Investigator Award, the Andrzej J. Komor Young Investigator Award, the VPHi Thesis Award in In Silico Medicine, and the KU Leuven Research Council Award in Biomedical Sciences.

  • Kayvon Fatahalian

    Kayvon Fatahalian

    Associate Professor of Computer Science

    BioKayvon Fatahalian is an Associate Professor in the Computer Science Department at Stanford University. Kayvon's research focuses on the design of systems for real-time graphics, high-efficiency simulation engines for applications in entertainment and AI, and platforms for the analysis of images and videos at scale.

  • Vivian Feig

    Vivian Feig

    Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering

    BioDr. Vivian Feig is an incoming Assistant Professor in the Mechanical Engineering department, beginning March 2024. The Feig lab aims to develop low-cost, noninvasive, and widely-accessible medical technologies that integrate seamlessly with the human body. We accomplish this by developing functional materials and devices with dynamic mechanical properties, leveraging chemistry and physics insights to engineer novel systems at multiple length scales. In pursuit of our goals, we maintain a strong emphasis on integrity and diversity, while nurturing the intellectual curiosity and holistic growth of our team members as researchers, communicators, and leaders.

  • Chelsea Finn

    Chelsea Finn

    Assistant Professor of Computer Science and of Electrical Engineering
    On Partial Leave from 04/01/2024 To 06/30/2024

    BioChelsea Finn is an Assistant Professor in Computer Science and Electrical Engineering at Stanford University, and the William George and Ida Mary Hoover Faculty Fellow. Professor Finn's research interests lie in the ability to enable robots and other agents to develop broadly intelligent behavior through learning and interaction. Her work lies at the intersection of machine learning and robotic control, including topics such as end-to-end learning of visual perception and robotic manipulation skills, deep reinforcement learning of general skills from autonomously collected experience, and meta-learning algorithms that can enable fast learning of new concepts and behaviors. Professor Finn received her Bachelors degree in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT and her PhD in Computer Science at UC Berkeley. Her research has been recognized through the ACM doctoral dissertation award, an NSF graduate fellowship, a Facebook fellowship, the C.V. Ramamoorthy Distinguished Research Award, and the MIT Technology Review 35 under 35 Award, and her work has been covered by various media outlets, including the New York Times, Wired, and Bloomberg. Throughout her career, she has sought to increase the representation of underrepresented minorities within CS and AI by developing an AI outreach camp at Berkeley for underprivileged high school students, a mentoring program for underrepresented undergraduates across three universities, and leading efforts within the WiML and Berkeley WiCSE communities of women researchers.

    Website: https://ai.stanford.edu/~cbfinn

  • Michael Fischbach

    Michael Fischbach

    Liu (Liao) Family Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe microbiome carries out extraordinary feats of biology: it produces hundreds of molecules, many of which impact host physiology; modulates immune function potently and specifically; self-organizes biogeographically; and exhibits profound stability in the face of perturbations. Our lab studies the mechanisms of microbiome-host interactions. Our approach is based on two technologies we recently developed: a complex (119-member) defined gut community that serves as an analytically manageable but biologically relevant system for experimentation, and new genetic systems for common species from the microbiome. Using these systems, we investigate mechanisms at the community level and the strain level.

    1) Community-level mechanisms. A typical gut microbiome consists of 200-250 bacterial species that span >6 orders of magnitude in relative abundance. As a system, these bacteria carry out extraordinary feats of metabolite consumption and production, elicit a variety of specific immune cell populations, self-organize geographically and metabolically, and exhibit profound resilience against a wide range of perturbations. Yet remarkably little is known about how the community functions as a system. We are exploring this by asking two broad questions: How do groups of organisms work together to influence immune function? What are the mechanisms that govern metabolism and ecology at the 100+ strain scale? Our goal is to learn rules that will enable us to design communities that solve specific therapeutic problems.

    2) Strain-level mechanisms. Even though gut and skin colonists live in communities, individual strains can have an extraordinary impact on host biology. We focus on two broad (and partially overlapping) categories:

    Immune modulation: Can we redirect colonist-specific T cells against an antigen of interest by expressing it on the surface of a bacterium? How do skin colonists induce high levels of Staphylococcus-specific antibodies in mice and humans?

    Abundant microbiome-derived molecules: By constructing single-strain/single-gene knockouts in a complex defined community, we will ask: What are the effects of bacterially produced molecules on host metabolism and immunology? Can the molecular output of low-abundance organisms impact host physiology?

    3) Cell and gene therapy. We have begun two new efforts in mammalian cell and gene therapies. First, we are developing methods that enable cell-type specific delivery of genome editing payloads in vivo. We are especially interested in delivery vehicles that are customizable and easy to manufacture. Second, we have begun a comprehensive genome mining effort with an emphasis on understudied or entirely novel enzyme systems with utility in mammalian genome editing.

  • Emily Fox

    Emily Fox

    Professor of Statistics and of Computer Science

    BioEmily Fox is a Professor in the Departments of Statistics and Computer Science at Stanford University. Prior to Stanford, she was the Amazon Professor of Machine Learning in the Paul G. Allen School of Computer Science & Engineering and Department of Statistics at the University of Washington. From 2018-2021, Emily led the Health AI team at Apple, where she was a Distinguished Engineer. Before joining UW, Emily was an Assistant Professor at the Wharton School Department of Statistics at the University of Pennsylvania. She earned her doctorate from Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS) at MIT where her thesis was recognized with EECS' Jin-Au Kong Outstanding Doctoral Thesis Prize and the Leonard J. Savage Award for Best Thesis in Applied Methodology.

    Emily has been awarded a CZ Biohub Investigator Award, Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE), a Sloan Research Fellowship, ONR Young Investigator Award, and NSF CAREER Award. Her research interests are in modeling complex time series arising in health, particularly from health wearables and neuroimaging modalities.

  • Michael Fredericson, MD

    Michael Fredericson, MD

    Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research focuses on the etiology, prevention, and treatment of overuse sports injuries in athletes and lifestyle medicine practices for improved health and longevity.

  • Michael T. Freehill, MD, FAOA

    Michael T. Freehill, MD, FAOA

    Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery

    BioDr. Freehill is a board-certified, double fellowship-trained specialist in orthopaedic surgery with a sub-specialty certification in sports medicine. His concentration is in shoulder and elbow. Dr. Freehill is a team physician for the Stanford University athletics program and head physician for the Stanford University baseball team. Dr. Freehill also teaches in the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    Dr. Freehill’s practice focuses on all shoulder conditions. He treats rotator cuff tears, shoulder instability, shoulder arthritis, sports shoulder, arthropathy, complex shoulder pathology, and sports related shoulder injury. In addition, he is also passionate about sports- related elbow injuries, with an emphasis on thrower’s elbow.

    Professional and amateur athletes, as well as non-athletes, come to Dr. Freehill for expert care. His sports medicine training and specialization in shoulder replacement procedures enable him to treat patients across the lifespan. Depending on factors including the patient’s condition and occupation, he may recommend treatment ranging from non-operative solutions (such as physical therapy) to cutting-edge biologics procedures or complex surgery.

    In addition to his positions within the Stanford University athletics program, Dr. Freehill serves as assistant team physician for the Oakland A’s. Previously, he was a team physician for the Detroit Tigers and the Winston-Salem Dash (affiliated with the Chicago White Sox); he assisted with the Baltimore Orioles. He has also served as Director of Sports Medicine for Wake Forest University Athletics.

    As executive director of the Stanford Baseball Science CORE, Dr. Freehill draws on his previous experience as a professional baseball player to help athletes of all skill levels. In the lab, he conducts cutting edge research on the biomechanics of overhead throwers in order to support advances in throwing performance. He has conducted a study on pitch counts in adolescent players funded by Major League Baseball. Dr. Freehill was also awarded a research grant from the National Institutes of Health to investigate stromal vascular fractionated mesenchymal cells and their potential for healing rotator cuff tendon tears.

    Dr. Freehill has pioneered the use of some of the latest techniques and technology for leading-edge care. Among the advanced technologies he utilizes is a virtual reality (VR) system that enables him to perform a simulated shoulder arthroplasty procedure prior to entering the operating room with a patient. The system also enables him to predict and order customized implants if needed, which is believed to enable a more positive outcome for patients.

    Peer-reviewed articles authored by Dr. Freehill explore rotator cuff injuries, shoulder arthroplasty, baseball-related injuries and performance interests, and more. His work has been featured in the American Journal of Sports Medicine, the Orthopedic Journal of Sports Medicine, Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery, Arthroscopy, and elsewhere. He has written numerous book chapters and made over 200 presentations at conferences around the world.
    Dr. Freehill’s honors include an Orthopaedic Residency Research Award while at Johns Hopkins University. He is also a Neer Award winner, denoting the highest research award selected annually by the American Shoulder and Elbow Society.

    Currently, he serves on the Medical Publishing Board of Trustees for the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine. He is a member of the American Orthopaedic Association, and the Major League Baseball Team Physician Association. He is a committee member for the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Society, International Congress of Arthroscopy and Sports Traumatology, the Arthroscopy Association of North America, and the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons.

  • Anne L. Friedlander

    Anne L. Friedlander

    Adjunct Professor

    BioAnne L. Friedlander, Ph.D, is the Assistant Director of Stanford Lifestyle Medicine, an Adjunct Professor in the Program in Human Biology, and a member of the Wu Tsai Human Performance Alliance. She has served as the Director of the Exercise Physiology Lab, the Director of the Mobility Division within the Stanford Center on Longevity (SCL), and the Associate Director for Education within the Geriatric Research, Education and Clinical Center (GRECC) at the VA Palo Alto. Dr. Friedlander has broad research experience in the areas of enhancing human performance, environmental physiology, and using physical activity and mobility to promote healthy aging. She also consults regularly with companies interested in developing new products, programs and ideas in the fitness and wellness space. She is passionate about the benefits of movement on the aging process and specializes in giving talks translating scientific findings on physiology and exercise into practical applications for people.

  • Lawrence Fung MD PhD

    Lawrence Fung MD PhD

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Major Laboratories & Clinical Translational Neurosciences Incubator)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Lawrence Fung an Associate Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University. He is the director of the Stanford Neurodiversity Project, director of the Neurodiversity Clinic, and principal investigator at the Fung Lab. His work, which focuses on autism and neurodiversity, traverses from multi-modal neuroimaging studies to new conceptualization of neurodiversity and its application to clinical, education, and employment settings. His lab advances the understanding of neural bases of human socio-communicative and cognitive functions by using novel neuroimaging and bioanalytical technologies. Using community-based participatory research approach, his team devises and implements novel interventions to improve the lives of neurodiverse individuals by maximizing their potential and productivity. His work has been supported by various agencies including the National Institutes of Health, Autism Speaks, California Department of Developmental Services, California Department of Rehabilitation, as well as philanthropy. He received his PhD in chemical engineering from Cornell University, and MD from George Washington University. He completed his general psychiatry residency, child and adolescent psychiatry fellowship, and postdoctoral research fellowship at Stanford.

  • Ansgar Furst

    Ansgar Furst

    Clinical Associate Professor (Affiliated), Psych/Public Mental Health & Population Sciences
    Staff, Psych/Public Mental Health & Population Sciences

    BioDr. Furst is a Clinical Associate Professor (affiliated) of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and of Neurology and Neurological Sciences at Stanford University School of Medicine. He is a Principal Investigator and Director of the California War Related Illness and Injury Study Center (WRIISC) Advanced Fellowship Post-Doctoral program and Associate Director of Neuroimaging. He is also a Senior Research Scientist at the Polytrauma System of Care (PSC) at VA Palo Alto Health Care System. Dr. Furst serves as Associate Editor for the journal Frontiers in Neurology and is a member of the editorial board of NEUROLOGY. His research focuses on chronic multisymptom illness, traumatic brain injury, sleep, pain and neurodegenerative diseases.

    For more information please visit:
    https://med.stanford.edu/furstlab.html

    Member of:
    Center for Sleep and Circadian Sciences
    https://med.stanford.edu/cscs.html

    Faculty Affiliate:
    Wu Tsai Human Performance Alliance
    https://humanperformance.stanford.edu

  • Xiaojing Gao

    Xiaojing Gao

    Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsHow do we design biological systems as “smart medicine” that sense patients’ states, process the information, and respond accordingly? To realize this vision, we will tackle fundamental challenges across different levels of complexity, such as (1) protein components that minimize their crosstalk with human cells and immunogenicity, (2) biomolecular circuits that function robustly in different cells and are easy to deliver, (3) multicellular consortia that communicate through scalable channels, and (4) therapeutic modules that interface with physiological inputs/outputs. Our engineering targets include biomolecules, molecular circuits, viruses, and cells, and our approach combines quantitative experimental analysis with computational simulation. The molecular tools we build will be applied to diverse fields such as neurobiology and cancer therapy.

  • Christopher Gardner

    Christopher Gardner

    Rehnborg Farquhar Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe role of nutrition in individual and societal health, with particular interests in: plant-based diets, differential response to low-carb vs. low-fat weight loss diets by insulin resistance status, chronic disease prevention, randomized controlled trials, human nutrition, community based studies, Community Based Participatory Research, sustainable food movement (animal rights and welfare, global warming, human labor practices), stealth health, nutrition policy, nutrition guidelines

  • Justin Gardner

    Justin Gardner

    Associate Professor of Psychology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsHow does neural activity in the human cortex create our sense of visual perception? We use a combination of functional magnetic resonance imaging, computational modeling and analysis, and psychophysical measurements to link human perception to cortical brain activity.

  • Brice Gaudilliere

    Brice Gaudilliere

    Associate Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine (Adult-MSD) and, by courtesy, of Pediatrics (Neonatology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe advent of high dimensional flow cytometry has revolutionized our ability to study and visualize the human immune system. Our group combines high parameter mass cytometry (a.k.a Cytometry by Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry, CyTOF), with advanced bio-computational methods to study how the human immune system responds and adapts to acute physiological perturbations. The laboratory currently focuses on two clinical scenarios: surgical trauma and pregnancy.

  • Olivier Gevaert

    Olivier Gevaert

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Biomedical Informatics) and of Biomedical Data Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy lab focuses on biomedical data fusion: the development of machine learning methods for biomedical decision support using multi-scale biomedical data. We primarily use methods based on regularized linear regression to accomplish this. We primarily focus on applications in oncology and neuroscience.

  • Nicholas Giori MD, PhD

    Nicholas Giori MD, PhD

    Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOsteoarthritis
    Medical Device Development

  • Garry Gold

    Garry Gold

    Stanford Medicine Professor of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy primary focus is application of new MR imaging technology to musculoskeletal problems. Current projects include: Rapid MRI for Osteoarthritis, Weight-bearing cartilage imaging with MRI, and MRI-based models of muscle. We are studying the application of new MR imaging techniques such as rapid imaging, real-time imaging, and short echo time imaging to learn more about biomechanics and pathology of bones and joints. I am also interested in functional imaging approaches using PET-MRI.

  • Andrea Goldstein-Piekarski

    Andrea Goldstein-Piekarski

    Assistant Professor (Research) of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Sleep Medicine)

    BioDr. Goldstein-Piekarski directs the Computational Psychiatry, Neuroscience, and Sleep Laboratory (CoPsyN Sleep Lab) as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University School of Medicine and PI within the Sierra-Pacific Mental Illness Research, Education and Clinical Center (MIRECC) at the Palo Alto VA. She received her PhD in 2014 at the University of California, Berkeley where she studied the consequences of sleep on emotional brain function. She then completed a Postdoctoral fellowship at Stanford focusing on understanding the brain basis of anxiety and depression.

    As the director of the CoPsyN Sleep Lab she is developing a translational, interdisciplinary research program that combines human neuroimaging, high-density EEG sleep recording, and computational modeling to understand the neural mechanisms through which sleep disruption contributes to affective disorders, particularly depression, across the lifespan. The ultimate goals of this research are to (1) develop mechanistically-informed interventions that directly target aspects of sleep and brain function to prevent and treat affective disorders and (2) identify novel biomarkers which can identify which individuals are most likely to experience improved mood following targeted sleep interventions.

    This work is currently supported by The KLS Foundation, a R01 from National Institute of Mental Health, and a R61 from the National Institute of Mental Health.

  • Alexander Gonzalez

    Alexander Gonzalez

    Scientific Project Manager

    Current Role at StanfordScientific Project Manager for the Wu Tsai Human Performance Alliance

  • Eric R. Gross

    Eric R. Gross

    Associate Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsA part of the laboratory studies organ injury and how common genetic variants may affect the response to injury caused by surgery; particularly aldehydes. Aldehyde accumulation can cause many post-operative complications that people experience during surgery- whether it be reperfusion injury, post-operative pain, cognitive dysfunction, or nausea. The other part of the lab studies the impact of e-cigarettes and alcohol, when coupled with genetics, on the cardiopulmonary system.

  • James Gross

    James Gross

    Ernest R. Hilgard Professor, Professor of Psychology and, by courtesy, of Philosophy

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI am interested in emotion and emotion regulation. My research employs behavioral, physiological, and brain measures to examine emotion-related personality processes and individual differences. My current interests include emotion coherence, specific emotion regulation strategies (reappraisal, suppression), automatic emotion regulation, and social anxiety.

  • Hyowon Gweon

    Hyowon Gweon

    Associate Professor of Psychology

    BioHyowon (Hyo) Gweon (she/her) is an Associate Professor in the Department of Psychology. As a leader of the Social Learning Lab, Hyo is broadly interested in how humans learn from others and help others learn: What makes human social learning so powerful, smart, and distinctive? Taking an interdisciplinary approach that combines developmental, computational, and neuroimaging methods, her research aims to explain the cognitive underpinnings of distinctively human learning, communication, and prosocial behaviors.

    Hyo received her PhD in Cognitive Science (2012) from MIT, where she continued as a post-doc before joining Stanford in 2014. She has been named as a Richard E. Guggenhime Faculty Scholar (2020) and a David Huntington Dean's Faculty Scholar (2019); she is a recipient of the APS Janet Spence Award for Transformative Early Career Contributions (2020), Jacobs Early Career Fellowship (2020), James S. McDonnell Scholar Award for Human Cognition (2018), APA Dissertation Award (2014), and Marr Prize (best student paper, Cognitive Science Society 2010).

  • Nicholas Haber

    Nicholas Haber

    Assistant Professor of Education

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI use AI models of of exploratory and social learning in order to better understand early human learning and development, and conversely, I use our understanding of early human learning to make robust AI models that learn in exploratory and social ways. Based on this, I develop AI-powered learning tools for children, geared in particular towards the education of those with developmental issues such as the Autism Spectrum Disorder and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, in the mold of my work on the Autism Glass Project. My formal graduate training in pure mathematics involved extending partial differential equation theory in cases involving the propagation of waves through complex media such as the space around a black hole. Since then, I have transitioned to the use of machine learning in developing both learning tools for children with developmental disorders and AI and cognitive models of learning.

  • Francois Haddad

    Francois Haddad

    Clinical Professor, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine

    BioDr. Francois Haddad, MD is a Clinical Professor of Medicine that specializes in the field of cardio-vascular imaging, pulmonary hypertension, advanced heart failure and transplantation. Dr. Haddad has over 18 years of practice in the field of cardiology. He directs Stanford Cardiovascular Institute Biomarker and Phenotypic Core Laboratory dedicated to translational studies in cardiovascular medicine. The laboratory focuses on (1) identifying early biomarkers of heart failure and aging, (2) bioengineering approaches to cardiovascular disease modeling and (3) novel informatic approach for the detection and risk stratification of disease. He is involved is several precision medicine initiatives in health including the Project Baseline, the Integrated Personalized Omics Profiling Initiative, the Athletic screening program at Stanford and the Strong-D cardiac rehabilitation initiative in individuals with diabetes mellitus.

  • Lou Halamek

    Lou Halamek

    Professor of Pediatrics (Neonatology) and, by courtesy, of Obstetrics and Gynecology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests1. development of hospital operations centers coupled with sophisticated simulation capabilities
    2. re-creation of near misses and adverse events
    3. optimizing human and system performance during resuscitation
    4. optimizing pattern recognition and situational awareness at the bedside
    5. evaluation and optimization of debriefing
    6. patient simulator design

  • Nicos Haralabidis

    Nicos Haralabidis

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Bioengineering

    BioMy research interests lie within both sports and clinical biomechanics applications. I rely upon merging conventional biomechanical in vivo measurements together with state-of-the-art musculoskeletal modeling and optimal control simulation approaches. The integrative approach I take enables me to understand how an individual may run faster, jump further, walk following surgery or intervention, and simultaneously estimate internal body dynamics noninvasively. As a Postdoctoral Research Scholar within the Wu Tsai Human Performance Alliance I aim to explore how stochastic optimal control and reinforcement learning methods can be applied to further our understanding of sporting performance.

  • Brian A. Hargreaves

    Brian A. Hargreaves

    Professor of Radiology (Radiological Sciences Laboratory) and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering and of Bioengineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI am interested in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) applications and augmented reality applications in medicine. These include abdominal, breast and musculoskeletal imaging, which require development of faster, quantitative, and more efficient MRI methods that provide improved diagnostic contrast compared with current methods. My work includes novel excitation schemes, efficient imaging methods and reconstruction tools and augmented reality in medicine.

  • H. Craig Heller

    H. Craig Heller

    Lorry I. Lokey/Business Wire Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsNeurobiology of sleep, circadian rhythms, regulation of body temperature, mammalian hibernation, and human exercise physiology. Currently applying background in sleep and circadian neurobiology the understanding and correcting the learning disability of Down Syndrome.

  • Jill Helms

    Jill Helms

    Professor of Surgery (Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Helms' research interests center around regenerative medicine and craniofacial development.