Wu Tsai Human Performance Alliance


Showing 251-270 of 270 Results

  • C. Jason Wang, MD, PhD

    C. Jason Wang, MD, PhD

    LCY: Tan Lan Lee Professor and Professor of Pediatrics (General Pediatrics) and of Health Policy

    BioDr. Wang is the Director of Center for Policy, Outcomes and Prevention. Prior to coming to Stanford in 2011, he was a faculty member at Boston University Schools of Medicine and Public Health. His other professional experiences include working as a management consultant with McKinsey and Company and serving as the project manager for Taiwan's National Health Insurance Reform Task-force. His current interests include: 1) COVID-19 related policies; 2) developing tools for assessing and improving the value of healthcare; 3) facilitating the use of mobile technology in improving quality of care; 4) supporting competency-based medical education curriculum, and 5) engaging in healthcare delivery and payment reforms.

  • Gordon Wetzstein

    Gordon Wetzstein

    Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering and, by courtesy, of Computer Science

    BioGordon Wetzstein is an Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering and, by courtesy, of Computer Science at Stanford University. He is the leader of the Stanford Computational Imaging Lab and a faculty co-director of the Stanford Center for Image Systems Engineering. At the intersection of computer graphics and vision, artificial intelligence, computational optics, and applied vision science, Prof. Wetzstein's research has a wide range of applications in next-generation imaging, wearable computing, and neural rendering systems. Prof. Wetzstein is a Fellow of Optica and the recipient of numerous awards, including an NSF CAREER Award, an Alfred P. Sloan Fellowship, an ACM SIGGRAPH Significant New Researcher Award, a Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE), an SPIE Early Career Achievement Award, an Electronic Imaging Scientist of the Year Award, an Alain Fournier Ph.D. Dissertation Award as well as many Best Paper and Demo Awards.

  • Matthew Wheeler

    Matthew Wheeler

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsTranslational research in rare and undiagnosed diseases. Basic and clinical research in cardiomyopathy genetics, mechanisms, screening, and treatment. Investigating novel agents for treatment of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and new mechanisms in heart failure. Cardiovascular screening and genetics in competitive athletes, disease gene discovery in cardiomyopathy and rare disease. Informatics approaches to rare disease and multiomics. Molecular transducers of physical activity bioinformatics.

  • Carl Wieman

    Carl Wieman

    Cheriton Family Professor and Professor of Physics and of Education, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe Wieman group’s research generally focuses on the nature of expertise in science and engineering, particularly physics, and how that expertise is best learned, measured, and taught. This involves a range of approaches, including individual cognitive interviews, laboratory experiments, and classroom interventions with controls for comparisons. We are also looking at how different classroom practices impact the attitudes and learning of different demographic groups.

  • Leanne Williams

    Leanne Williams

    Vincent V.C. Woo Professor, Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Major Laboratories and Clinical Translational Neurosciences Incubator) and, by courtesy, of Psychology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsA revolution is under way in psychiatry. We can now understand mental illness as an expression of underlying brain circuit disruptions, shaped by experience and genetics. Our lab is defining precision brain circuit biotypes for depression, anxiety and related disorders. We integrate large amounts of brain imaging, behavioral and clinical data and computational approaches. Biotypes are used in personalized intervention studies with selective drugs, neuromodulation and exploratory therapeutics.

  • Nolan Williams

    Nolan Williams

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Major Laboratories & Clinical Translational Neurosciences Incubator) and, by courtesy, of Radiology (Neuroimaging and Neurointervention)

    BioNolan Williams, M.D. is an Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University and Director of the Stanford Brain Stimulation Lab. The long-term goals of his research program are to develop innovative technologies and therapeutics capable of modulating the neural circuitry disrupted in mood disorders, OCD, and other neuropsychiatric conditions. His team has been developing neuroimaging-based approaches to precisely target therapeutic delivery and predict treatment responses to therapeutic neuromodulation and psychedelics. Dr. Williams earned his M.D. and completed his dual residencies in neurology and psychiatry at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC). Triple board-certified in general neurology, general psychiatry, as well as behavioral neurology and neuropsychiatry, Dr. Williams brings a comprehensive background in clinical neuroscience to his role as a clinically active neuropsychiatrist. His expertise extends to the development and implementation of novel therapeutics, including devices and novel compounds, for central nervous system illnesses.
    Over the past decade, Dr. Williams’ laboratory alongside collaborators at Stanford University have pioneered multiple novel therapeutic and human neuroscience approaches. Notably, Stanford Accelerated Intelligent Neuromodulation Therapy (SAINT) is the world's first non-invasive, rapid-acting neuromodulation approach for treatment-resistant depression. SAINT received FDA Breakthrough Device Designation Status (2021) and FDA Clearance (2022) and is the first psychiatric treatment to be covered by Medicare New Technology Add-On Payment (NTAP). As of April 2024, SAINT has been reimbursed for patients suffering from severe depression within inpatient psychiatric units. The SAINT technology is being deployed both clinically and in research protocols in laboratories and hospitals worldwide. Dr. Williams also has an expertise in psychedelic medicines for neuropsychiatric illness and is the first investigator to conduct mechanistic clinical trials exploring the neurobiological effects of ibogaine.
    His research accomplishments have garnered international recognition, earning prestigious awards from the Pritzker Neuropsychiatric Disorders Consortium, One Mind Institute, Wellcome Leap Foundation, International Brain Stimulation Conference, National Institute of Mental Health (Biobehavioral Research Award for Innovative New Scientists), Society of Biological Psychiatry (A. E. Bennett Award), along with multiple awards from the Brain Behavior Research Foundation (most notably the Gerald L. Klerman Award). His work has been featured in Scientific American, The New York Times, The Washington Post, USA Today, CBS Sunday Morning, and the TODAY Show.

  • Jiajun Wu

    Jiajun Wu

    Assistant Professor of Computer Science and, by courtesy, of Psychology

    BioJiajun Wu is an Assistant Professor of Computer Science and, by courtesy, of Psychology at Stanford University, working on computer vision, machine learning, and computational cognitive science. Before joining Stanford, he was a Visiting Faculty Researcher at Google Research. He received his PhD in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Wu's research has been recognized through the Young Investigator Programs (YIP) by ONR and by AFOSR, the NSF CAREER award, paper awards and finalists at ICCV, CVPR, SIGGRAPH Asia, CoRL, and IROS, dissertation awards from ACM, AAAI, and MIT, the 2020 Samsung AI Researcher of the Year, and faculty research awards from J.P. Morgan, Samsung, Amazon, and Meta.

  • Joy Wu

    Joy Wu

    Professor of Medicine (Endocrinology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy laboratory focuses on the pathways that regulate the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells into the osteoblast and adipocyte lineages. We are also studying the role of osteoblasts in the hematopoietic and cancer niches in the bone marrow microenvironment.

  • Tony Wyss-Coray, PhD

    Tony Wyss-Coray, PhD

    D. H. Chen Professor II

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsUse of genetic and molecular tools to dissect immune and inflammatory pathways in Alzheimer's and neurodegeneration.

  • Fan Yang

    Fan Yang

    Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery and of Bioengineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur lab’s mission is to develop therapies for regenerating human tissues lost due to diseases or aging, and to build tissue engineered 3D models for understanding disease progression and informing drug discovery. We invent biomaterials and engineering tools to elucidate and modulate biology, and also use biology to inform materials and engineering design. Our work is highly interdisciplinary, and is driven by unmet clinical needs or key gaps in biology.

  • Phillip C. Yang, MD

    Phillip C. Yang, MD

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Yang is a physician-scientist whose research interest focuses on clinical translation of the fundamental molecular and cellular processes of myocardial restoration. His research employs novel in vivo multi-modality molecular and cellular imaging technology to translate the basic innovation in cardiovascular pluripotent stem cell biologics. Dr. Yang is currently a PI on the NIH/NHLBI funded CCTRN UM1 grant, which is designed to conduct multi-center clinical trial on novel biological therapy.

  • Yunzhi Peter Yang

    Yunzhi Peter Yang

    Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery and, by courtesy, of Materials Science and Engineering and of Bioengineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsYang’ lab's research interests are in the areas of bio-inspired biomaterials, medical devices, and 3D printing approaches for re-creating a suitable microenvironment for cell growth and tissue regeneration for musculoskeletal disease diagnosis and treatment, including multiple tissue healing such as rotator cuff injury, orthopedic diseases such as osteoporosis and osteonecrosis, and orthopedic traumas such as massive bone and muscle injuries.

  • Jason Yeatman

    Jason Yeatman

    Associate Professor of Pediatrics (Developmental-Behavioral Pediatrics), of Education and of Psychology

    BioDr. Jason Yeatman is an Associate Professor in the Graduate School of Education and Department of Psychology at Stanford University and the Division of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics at Stanford University School of Medicine. Dr. Yeatman completed his PhD in Psychology at Stanford where he studied the neurobiology of literacy and developed new brain imaging methods for studying the relationship between brain plasticity and learning. After finishing his PhD, he took a faculty position at the University of Washington’s Institute for Learning and Brain Sciences before returning to Stanford.

    As the director of the Brain Development and Education Lab, the overarching goal of his research is to understand the mechanisms that underlie the process of learning to read, how these mechanisms differ in children with dyslexia, and to design literacy intervention programs that are effective across the wide spectrum of learning differences. His lab employs a collection of structural and functional neuroimaging measurements to study how a child’s experience with reading instruction shapes the development of brain circuits that are specialized for this unique cognitive function.

  • Serena Yeung-Levy

    Serena Yeung-Levy

    Assistant Professor of Biomedical Data Science and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    BioDr. Serena Yeung-Levy is an Assistant Professor of Biomedical Data Science and, by courtesy, of Computer Science and of Electrical Engineering at Stanford University. Her research focus is on developing artificial intelligence and machine learning algorithms to enable new capabilities in biomedicine and healthcare. She has extensive expertise in deep learning and computer vision, and has developed computer vision algorithms for analyzing diverse types of visual data ranging from video capture of human behavior, to medical images and cell microscopy images.

    Dr. Yeung-Levy leads the Medical AI and Computer Vision Lab at Stanford. She is affiliated with the Stanford Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, the Clinical Excellence Research Center, and the Center for Artificial Intelligence in Medicine & Imaging. She is also a Chan Zuckerberg Biohub Investigator and has served on the NIH Advisory Committee to the Director Working Group on Artificial Intelligence.

  • Roham Zamanian

    Roham Zamanian

    Professor of Medicine (Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests1. Development and evaluation of prognostic and diagnostic integral biomarkers in PAH.

    2. Prevalence and Treatment of Insulin Resistance in PAH.

    3. Role of inflammation and proteomic signature in PAH

    4. Development of novel therapeutics (bench to bedside) including FK506 & Elastase Inhibition in PAH.

    5. Assessment of Vasoreactivity (gain and loss) in pulmonary arterial hypertension

    6. Assessment of microvascular function in PAH.

  • Michael Zeineh

    Michael Zeineh

    Associate Professor of Radiology (Neuroimaging and Neurointervention)

    BioDr. Michael Zeineh received a B.S. in Biology at Caltech in 1995 and obtained his M.D.-Ph.D. from UCLA in 2003. After internship also at UCLA, he went on to radiology residency and neuroradiology fellowship both at Stanford. He has been faculty in Stanford Neuroradiology since 2010. He spearheads many initiatives in advanced clinical imaging at Stanford, including clinical fMRI and DTI. Simultaneously, he runs a lab with the goal of discovering new imaging abnormalities in neurodegenerative disorders, with a focus on detailed microcircuitry in regions such as the hippocampal formation using advanced, multi-modal in vivo and ex vivo methods, with applications to neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease and mild traumatic brain injury.

  • Jamie Zeitzer

    Jamie Zeitzer

    Professor (Research) of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Sleep Medicine)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Zeitzer is a circadian physiologist specializing in the understanding of the impact of light on circadian rhythms and other aspects of non-image forming light perception.
    He examines the manner in which humans respond to light and ways to manipulate this responsiveness, with direct application to jet lag, shift work, and altered sleep timing in teens. Dr. Zeitzer has also pioneered the use of actigraphy in the determination of epiphenomenal markers of psychiatric disorders.

  • Renee Zhao

    Renee Zhao

    Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering and, by courtesy, of Materials Science and Engineering

    BioRuike Renee Zhao is an Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering at Stanford University where she directs the Soft Intelligent Materials Laboratory. Renee received her BS degree from Xi'an Jiaotong University in 2012, and her MS and PhD degrees from Brown University in 2014 and 2016, respectively. She was a postdoc associate at MIT during 2016-2018 prior to her appointment as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at The Ohio State University from 2018 to 2021.

    Renee’s research focuses on the development of stimuli-responsive soft composites for multifunctional robotic systems with integrated shape-changing, assembling, sensing, and navigation. By combining mechanics, polymer engineering, and advanced material manufacturing techniques, the functional soft composites enable applications in soft robotics, miniaturized biomedical devices, flexible electronics, and deployable and morphing structures.

    Renee is a recipient of the ARO Early Career Program (ECP) Award (2023), AFOSR Young Investigator Research Program (YIP) Award (2023), Eshelby Mechanics Award for Young Faculty (2022), ASME Henry Hess Early Career Publication Award (2022), ASME Pi Tau Sigma Gold Medal (2022), ASME Applied Mechanics Division Journal of Applied Mechanics Award (2021), NSF Career Award (2020), and ASME Applied Mechanics Division Haythornthwaite Research Initiation Award (2018).