Precourt Institute for Energy


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  • Leonid Kazovsky

    Leonid Kazovsky

    Professor (Research) of Electrical Engineering, Emeritus

    BioProfessor Kazovsky and his research group are investigating green energy-efficient networks. The focus of their research is on access and in-building networks and on hybrid optical / wireless networks. Prof. Kazovsky's research group is also conducting research on next-generation Internet architectures and novel zero-energy photonic components.

  • Charles D Kolstad

    Charles D Kolstad

    Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research and at the Precourt Institute for Energy

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research interests are broadly in environmental economics and related areas of industrial organization and public economics. My policy-related focus within these fields is climate change and energy markets.

    I currently have several projects related to uncertainty and learning in strategic contexts regarding the provision of public goods. For the most part, the application is international environmental agreements. This work is primarily theoretical, though with some empirical and experimental work to validate and illuminate theory. I also have research interests in energy economics (particularly regulation) and other dimensions of the economics of climate change.

    I welcome new PhD students who wish to study with me. Typically, my students train to be environmental or resource economists, which means they receive strong training in economics. At Stanford this means successfully taking the first year PhD sequences in microeconomics (Econ 202-204) and econometrics (Econ 270-272) offered by the Department of Economics. In addition, students should take the PhD classes Economics 250 (Environmental Economics) and 251 (Resource and Energy Economics). This is a minimum and other coursework would depend on student interest and needs. Strong preparation in math is essential.

    There are a number of PhD programs at Stanford that are appropriate for someone seeking training as an environmental economist. In addition to the Department of Economics, there are several other departments in which students may apply and matriculate, including the Emmet Interdisciplinary Program in Environment and Resources (E-IPER).

    Working Papers

  • Jeffrey┬áR. Koseff

    Jeffrey R. Koseff

    William Alden Campbell and Martha Campbell Professor in the School of Engineering and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    BioJeff Koseff, founding co-director of the Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment, is an expert in the interdisciplinary domain of environmental fluid mechanics. His research focuses on the interaction between physical and biological systems in natural aquatic environments, and in particular on turbulence and internal wave dynamics; transport, mixing, and phytoplankton dynamics in estuarine systems; and coral reef, kelp forest, and sea-grass hydrodynamics. More recently he has begun focusing on the fate of brine discharges in the near coastal ocean from desalination facilities, and on the use of natural vegetation for providing coastal protection and resilience. Long-term research projects include understanding the transport of mass and momentum in estuarine systems such as San Francisco Bay, and understanding how water flow affects the functioning of California kelp forests, and the coral reef systems of the Great Barrier Reef, the Red Sea and Hawaii. Koseff has served on the board of governors of the Israel Institute of Technology and has served on the visiting committees of the Civil and Environmental Engineering Department at Carnegie Mellon University, Iowa Institute of Hydraulic Research and The MIT-WHOI Joint Program. He is a former member of the Independent Science Board of the Bay/Delta Authority.

  • Anthony Kovscek

    Anthony Kovscek

    Keleen and Carlton Beal Professor of Petroleum Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch
    I am interested in the recovery of unconventional hydrocarbon resources and mitigating carbon emissions from fossil fuels via geological sequestration of greenhouse gases. My research group and I examine the physics of flow through porous media at length scales that vary from the pore to the laboratory to the reservoir. The organizing themes are flow imaging to delineate the mechanisms of multiphase flow (oil, water, and gas) in porous media and the synthesis of models from experimental, theoretical, and field data. In all of our work, physical observations, obtained mainly from laboratory and field measurements, are interwoven with theory.

    Teaching
    My teaching interests center broadly around education of students to meet the energy challenges that we will face this century. I teach undergraduate courses that examine the interplay of energy use and environmental issues including renewable energy resources and sustainability. At the graduate level, I offer classes on enhanced oil recovery and the thermodynamics of hydrocarbon mixtures.

    Professional Activities
    Member, American Geophysical Union (2006); Editorial Board, SPE Reservoir Evaluation and Engineering (2006-present); Society of Petroleum Engineers (SPE) Distinguished Achievement Award for Petroleum Engineering Faculty (2006); School of Earth Sciences Award for Excellence in Teaching (1998); Earth Systems Program Executive Committee (2002-present); Woods Institute for Environment Energy Committee (2005-present); SPE Continuing Education Committee (2000-present, chair 2004-05); steering committee chair, SPE Forum, Enhanced Oil Recovery: What's Next? (2005-06); Editorial Board of the Journal of Petroleum Technology (2004-present) and SPE Reservoir Engineering and Evaluation (2006-present); member, Society of Petroleum Engineers, American Geophysical Union, and the American Chemical Society.