Precourt Institute for Energy


Showing 1-50 of 108 Results

  • Olav Solgaard

    Olav Solgaard

    Professor of Electrical Engineering

    BioThe Solgaard group focus on design and fabrication of nano-photonics and micro-optical systems. We combine photonic crystals, optical meta-materials, silicon photonics, and MEMS, to create efficient and reliable systems for communication, sensing, imaging, and optical manipulation.

  • Chris Field

    Chris Field

    Melvin and Joan Lane Professor for Interdisciplinary Environmental Studies, Director, Woods Institute for the Environment, Professor of Earth System Science, of Biology and Senior Fellow at the Precourt Institute for Energy

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch
    My field is global ecology, and my research emphasizes ecological contributions across the range of Earth science disciplines. My colleagues and I develop diverse approaches to quantifying large-scale ecosystem processes, using satellites, atmospheric data, models, and census data, and explore global-scale patterns of vegetation-climate feedbacks, carbon cycle dynamics, primary production, forest management, and fire. At the ecosystem-scale, we conduct experiments on grassland responses to global change, which integrate approaches from molecular biology to remote sensing.

    Teaching
    I am one of five professors who teach the Earth Systems field studies course for advanced undergrads and co-terms at Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve. I also teach an introductory seminar on climate change for freshmen.

    Professional Activities
    Director, Department of Global Ecology, Carnegie Institution; Faculty Director, Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve; Professor, Department of Environmental Earth System Science, Stanford University; Senior Fellow, Woods Institute for the Environment, Stanford University; Senior Fellow, Precourt Institute for Energy, Stanford University; Melvin and Joan Lane Professor for Interdisciplinary Environmental Studies, Stanford University

  • Stacey Bent

    Stacey Bent

    Jagdeep and Roshni Singh Professor in the School of Engineering, Senior Associate Dean for Faculty & Academic Affairs, Senior Fellow at Precourt and Professor, by courtesy, of Materials Science & Eng, of Electrical Eng and of Chemistry

    BioThe research in the Bent laboratory is focused on understanding and controlling surface and interfacial chemistry and applying this knowledge to a range of problems in semiconductor processing, micro- and nano-electronics, nanotechnology, and sustainable and renewable energy. Much of the research aims to develop a molecular-level understanding in these systems, and hence the group uses of a variety of molecular probes. Systems currently under study in the group include functionalization of semiconductor surfaces, mechanisms and control of atomic layer deposition, molecular layer deposition, nanoscale materials for light absorption, interface engineering in photovoltaics, catalyst and electrocatalyst deposition.

  • Mark Brongersma

    Mark Brongersma

    Professor of Materials Science and Engineering and, by courtesy, of Applied Physics

    BioMark Brongersma is a Professor in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at Stanford University. He received his PhD in Materials Science from the FOM Institute in Amsterdam, The Netherlands, in 1998. From 1998-2001 he was a postdoctoral research fellow at the California Institute of Technology. During this time, he coined the term “Plasmonics” for a new device technology that exploits the unique optical properties of nanoscale metallic structures to route and manipulate light at the nanoscale. His current research is directed towards the development and physical analysis of nanostructured materials that find application in nanoscale electronic and photonic devices. Brongersma received a National Science Foundation Career Award, the Walter J. Gores Award for Excellence in Teaching, the International Raymond and Beverly Sackler Prize in the Physical Sciences (Physics) for his work on plasmonics, and is a Fellow of the Optical Society of America, the SPIE, and the American Physical Society.

  • Craig Criddle

    Craig Criddle

    Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Senior Fellow, by courtesy, at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    BioCriddle's research focuses on biotechnology and microbial ecology for clean water, clean energy, and healthy ecosystems.

  • Yi Cui

    Yi Cui

    Professor of Materials Science and Engineering, of Photon Science and, by courtesy, of Chemistry

    BioCui studies nanoscale phenomena and their applications broadly defined. Research Interests: Nanocrystal and nanowire synthesis and self-assembly, electron transfer and transport in nanomaterials and at the nanointerface, nanoscale electronic and photonic devices, batteries, solar cells, microbial fuel cells, water filters and chemical and biological sensors.

  • Reinhold H. Dauskardt

    Reinhold H. Dauskardt

    Ruth G. and William K. Bowes Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor, by courtesy, of Mechanical Engineering and of Surgery

    BioDauskardt and his group have worked extensively on integrating new materials into emerging technologies including thin-film structures for nanoscience and energy technologies, high-performance composite and laminates for aerospace, and on biomaterials and soft tissues in bioengineering. His group has pioneered methods for characterizing adhesion and cohesion of thin films used extensively in device technologies. His research on wound healing has concentrated on establishing a biomechanics framework to quantify the mechanical stresses and biologic responses in healing wounds and define how the mechanical environment affects scar formation. Experimental studies are complimented with a range of multiscale computational capabilities. His research includes interaction with researchers nationally and internationally in academia, industry, and clinical practice.

  • Jim Plummer

    Jim Plummer

    John M. Fluke Professor of Electrical Engineering and Professor, by courtesy, of Materials Science and Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPlummer studies both the physics which govern device operation in silicon integrated circuits and the technology used to fabricate these circuits. Recent work is aimed at extending silicon device structures into nanoscale dimensions.His research also explores the scaling limits of silicon technology and the application of this technology outside traditional integrated circuits.

  • Alfred M. Spormann

    Alfred M. Spormann

    Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering, of Chemical Engineering and, by courtesy, of Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMetabolism of anaerobic microbes in diseases, bioenergy, and bioremediation

  • Shan X. Wang

    Shan X. Wang

    Professor of Materials Science and Engineering and of Electrical Engineering and, by courtesy, of Radiology (Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Wang is the Director of Stanford Center for Magnetic Nanotechnology, and the Co-PI of the Stanford Center for Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence. His research interests lie in nanotechnology and information storage, including magnetic/spintronic biochips, in vitro diagnostics, cell sorting, magnetic nanoparticles, nano-patterning, spin electronic materials and sensors, as well as magnetic integrated inductors and transformers.

  • Sarah Heilshorn

    Sarah Heilshorn

    Associate Professor of Materials Science and Engineering and, by courtesy, of Chemical Engineering and of Bioengineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsProtein engineering
    Tissue engineering
    Regenerative medicine
    Biomaterials

  • Jeffrey R. Koseff

    Jeffrey R. Koseff

    William Alden Campbell and Martha Campbell Professor in the School of Engineering and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    BioJeff Koseff, founding co-director of the Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment, is an expert in the interdisciplinary domain of environmental fluid mechanics. His research focuses on the interaction between physical and biological systems in natural aquatic environments, and in particular on turbulence and internal wave dynamics; transport, mixing, and phytoplankton dynamics in estuarine systems; and coral reef, kelp forest, and sea-grass hydrodynamics. More recently he has begun focusing on the fate of brine discharges in the near coastal ocean from desalination facilities, and on the use of natural vegetation for providing coastal protection and resilience. Long-term research projects include understanding the transport of mass and momentum in estuarine systems such as San Francisco Bay, and understanding how water flow affects the functioning of California kelp forests, and the coral reef systems of the Great Barrier Reef, the Red Sea and Hawaii. Koseff has served on the board of governors of the Israel Institute of Technology and has served on the visiting committees of the Civil and Environmental Engineering Department at Carnegie Mellon University, Iowa Institute of Hydraulic Research and The MIT-WHOI Joint Program. He is a former member of the Independent Science Board of the Bay/Delta Authority.

  • Nicholas Melosh

    Nicholas Melosh

    Associate Professor of Materials Science and Engineering and of Photon Science

    BioMelosh's research is focused on developing methods to detect and control chemical processes on the nanoscale, to create materials that are responsive to their local environment. The research goal incorporates many of the hallmarks of biological adaptability, based on feedback control between cellular receptors and protein expression. Similar artificial networks may be achieved by fabricating arrays of nanoscale devices that can detect and influence their local surroundings through ionic potential, temperature, mechanical motion, capacitance, or electrochemistry. These devices are particularly suited as smart biomaterials, where multiple surface-cell interactions must be monitored and adjusted simultaneously for optimal cell adhesion and growth. Other interests include precise control over self-assembled materials, and potential methods to monitor the diagnostics of complicated chemical systems, such as the effect of drug treatments within patients.

    Research Interests:
    Molecular materials at interfaces
    Directed dynamic self-assembly
    Controlling molecular or biomolecular assembly and behavior
    Influence of local electronic, optical or thermal stimuli

  • Sally Benson

    Sally Benson

    Director, Precourt Institute for Energy and Professor of Energy Resources Engineering and Senior Fellow at the Precourt Institute for Energy

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research is focused on reducing the risks of climate change by developing energy supplies with low carbon emissions. Students and post-doctoral fellows in my research group work on carbon dioxide storage, energy systems analysis, and pathways for transitioning to a low-carbon energy system.

  • Christopher Chidsey

    Christopher Chidsey

    Associate Professor of Chemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe Chidsey group research interest is to build the chemical base for molecular electronics. To accomplish this, we synthesize the molecular and nanoscopic systems, build the analytical tools and develop the theoretical understanding with which to study electron transfer between electrodes and among redox species through insulating molecular bridges

  • James Harris

    James Harris

    James and Elenor Chesebrough Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor, by courtesy, of Materials Science and Engineering and of Applied Physics

    BioHarris utilizes molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) of III-V compound semiconductor materials to investigate new materials for electronic and optoelectronic devices. He utilizes heterojunctions, superlattices, quantum wells, and three-dimensional self-assembled quantum dots to create metastable engineered materials with novel or improved properties for electronic and optoelectronic devices. He has recently focused on integration of photonic devices and micro optics for creation of new minimally invasive bio and medical systems for micro-array and neural imaging.

  • Mark Jacobson

    Mark Jacobson

    Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Senior Fellow at the Precourt Institute for Energy, and at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    BioMark Z. Jacobson’s career has focused on better understanding air pollution and global warming problems and developing large-scale clean, renewable energy solutions to them. Toward that end, he has developed and applied three-dimensional atmosphere-biosphere-ocean computer models and solvers to simulate air pollution, weather, climate, and renewable energy. He has also developed roadmaps to transition states and countries to 100% clean, renewable energy for all purposes and computer models to examine grid stability in the presence of high penetrations of renewable energy.

  • Louis Durlofsky

    Louis Durlofsky

    Otto N. Miller Professor in Earth Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsGeneral reservoir simulation, optimization, reduced-order modeling, upscaling, flow in fractured systems, history matching, CO2 sequestration, energy systems optimization

  • Zhi-Xun Shen

    Zhi-Xun Shen

    Paul Pigott Professor in Physical Sciences, Professor of Photon Science, of Physics and Senior Fellow at the Precourt Institute for Energy

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Shen's main research interest lies in the area of condensed matter and materials physics, as well as the applications of materials and devices. He develops photon based innovative instrumentation and advanced experimental techniques, ranging from angle-resolved photoemission to microwave imaging, soft x-ray scattering and time domain spectroscopy and scattering. He has created a body of literature that advanced our understanding of quantum materials, including superconductors, semiconductors, novel magnets, topological insulators, novel carbon and electron emitters. He is best known for his discoveries of the momentum structure of anisotropic d-wave pairing gap and anomalous normal state pseudogap in high temperature superconductors. He has further leveraged the advanced characterization tool to make better materials through thin film and interface engineering.

  • Shanhui Fan

    Shanhui Fan

    Director, Edward L. Ginzton Laboratory, Professor of Electrical Engineering and, by courtesy, of Applied Physics

    BioFan's research involves the theory and simulations of photonic and solid-state materials and devices; photonic crystals; nano-scale photonic devices and plasmonics; quantum optics; computational electromagnetics; parallel scientific computing.

  • Zhenan Bao

    Zhenan Bao

    K. K. Lee Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor, by courtesy, of Materials Science and Engineering and of Chemistry

    BioZhenan Bao joined Stanford University in 2004. She is currently a K.K. Lee Professor in Chemical Engineering, and with courtesy appointments in Chemistry and Material Science and Engineering. She is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and National Academy of Inventors. She founded the Stanford Wearable Electronics Initiative (eWEAR) and is the current faculty director. She is also an affiliated faculty member of Precourt Institute, Woods Institute, ChEM-H and Bio-X. Professor Bao received her Ph.D. degree in Chemistry from The University of Chicago in 1995 and joined the Materials Research Department of Bell Labs, Lucent Technologies. She became a Distinguished Member of Technical Staff in 2001. Professor Bao currently has more than 400 refereed publications and more than 60 US patents. She served as a member of Executive Board of Directors for the Materials Research Society and Executive Committee Member for the Polymer Materials Science and Engineering division of the American Chemical Society. She was an Associate Editor for the Royal Society of Chemistry journal Chemical Science, Polymer Reviews and Synthetic Metals. She serves on the international advisory board for Advanced Materials, Advanced Energy Materials, ACS Nano, Accounts of Chemical Reviews, Advanced Functional Materials, Chemistry of Materials, Chemical Communications, Journal of American Chemical Society, Nature Asian Materials, Materials Horizon and Materials Today. She is one of the Founders and currently sits on the Board of Directors of C3 Nano Co., a silicon valley venture funded company. She is Fellow of AAAS, ACS, MRS, SPIE, ACS POLY and ACS PMSE. She was a recipient of the L'Oreal UNESCO Women in Science Award in 2017. She was awarded the ACS Applied Polymer Science Award in 2017, ACS Creative Polymer Chemistry Award in 2013 ACS Cope Scholar Award in 2011, and was selected by Phoenix TV, China as 2010 Most influential Chinese in the World-Science and Technology Category. She is a recipient of the Royal Society of Chemistry Beilby Medal and Prize in 2009, IUPAC Creativity in Applied Polymer Science Prize in 2008, American Chemical Society Team Innovation Award 2001, R&D 100 Award, and R&D Magazine Editors Choice Best of the Best new technology for 2001. She has been selected in 2002 by the American Chemical Society Women Chemists Committee as one of the twelve Outstanding Young Woman Scientist who is expected to make a substantial impact in chemistry during this century. She is also selected by MIT Technology Review magazine in 2003 as one of the top 100 young innovators for this century. She has been selected as one of the recipients of Stanford Terman Fellow and has been appointed as the Robert Noyce Faculty Scholar, Finmeccanica Faculty Scholar and David Filo and Jerry Yang Faculty Scholar.

  • Alberto Salleo

    Alberto Salleo

    Associate Professor of Materials Science and Engineering

    BioNovel materials and processing techniques for large-area and flexible electronic/photonic devices. Ultra-fast laser processing for electronics, photonics and biotechnology. Defects and structure/property studies of polymeric semiconductors, nano-structured and amorphous materials in thin films.

  • Paul McIntyre

    Paul McIntyre

    Rick and Melinda Reed Professor in the School of Engineering and Senior Fellow, by courtesy, at the Precourt Institute for Energy

    BioMcIntyre's group performs research on nanostructured inorganic materials for applications in electronics, energy technologies and sensors. He is best known for his work on metal oxide/semiconductor interfaces, ultrathin dielectrics, defects in complex metal oxide thin films, and nanostructured Si-Ge single crystals. His research team synthesizes materials, characterizes their structures and compositions with a variety of advanced microscopies and spectroscopies, studies the passivation of their interfaces, and measures functional properties of devices.

  • Abbas El Gamal

    Abbas El Gamal

    Hitachi America Professor in the School of Engineering

    BioAbbas El Gamal is the Hitachi America Professor in the School of Engineering and the Fortinet Founders Chair of the Department of Electrical Engineering at Stanford University. He received his B.Sc. Honors degree from Cairo University in 1972, and his M.S. in Statistics and Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering both from Stanford University in 1977 and 1978, respectively. From 1978 to 1980, he was an Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering at USC. From 2004 to 2009, he was the Director of the Information Systems Laboratory at Stanford University. His research contributions have been in network information theory, FPGAs, and digital imaging devices and systems. He has authored or coauthored over 230 papers and holds 35 patents in these areas. He is coauthor of the book Network Information Theory (Cambridge Press 2011). He has received several honors and awards for his research contributions, including the 2016 Richard W. Hamming Medal, the 2012 Claude E. Shannon Award, and the 2004 INFOCOM Paper Award. He is a member of the U.S. National Academy of Engineering and a Fellow of the IEEE. He has co-founded and served on the board of directors and advisory boards of several semiconductor and biotechnology startup companies.

  • Jack Baker

    Jack Baker

    Associate Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    BioJack Baker's research focuses on the use of probabilistic and statistical tools for modeling of extreme loads on structures. He has investigated probabilistic modeling of seismic hazards, improved characterization of earthquake ground motions, dynamic analysis of structures, prediction of the spatial extent of soil failures from earthquakes, and tools for modeling loads on spatially distributed infrastructure systems. Dr. Baker joined Stanford from the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH Zurich), where he was a visiting researcher in the Department of Structural Engineering. He received his Ph.D. in Structural Engineering from Stanford University, where he also earned M.S. degrees in Statistics and Structural Engineering. He has industry experience in seismic hazard assessment, ground motion selection, construction management, and modeling of catastrophe losses for insurance companies.

  • Hamdi Tchelepi

    Hamdi Tchelepi

    Professor of Energy Resources Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCurrent research activities include: (1) modeling unstable miscible and immiscible flows in heterogeneous formations, (2) developing multiscale formulations and scalable linear/nonlinear solution algorithms for multiphase flow in large-scale subsurface systems, and (3) developing stochastic approaches for quantifying the uncertainty associated with predictions of subsurface flow performance.

  • Michael McGehee

    Michael McGehee

    Professor of Materials Science and Engineering and Senior Fellow, by courtesy, at the Precourt Institute for Energy

    BioMike McGehee's primary research interests are developing new materials for smart windows and solar cells. He has taught courses on nanotechnology, nanocharacterization, organic semiconductors, polymer science and solar cells. He received his undergraduate degree in physics from Princeton University and his PhD degree in Materials Science from the University of California at Santa Barbara, where he did research on polymer lasers in the lab of Nobel Laureate Alan Heeger. He won the 2007 Materials Research Society Outstanding Young Investigator Award. He is a technical advisor to Next Energy, PLANT PV, and Sinovia and his former students have started more than ten companies.

  • Jonathan Stebbins

    Jonathan Stebbins

    Professor of Geological Sciences and, by courtesy, of Materials Science and Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly Interestsstructure and dynamics of crystalline, glassy, and molten inorganic materials and how these relate to geologically and technologically important properties and processes; solid state Nuclear Magnetic Resoance (NMR); mineralogy; igneous petrology; glass science

  • Ronald Hanson

    Ronald Hanson

    Clarence J. and Patricia R. Woodard Professor of Mechanical Engineering

    BioProfessor Hanson's research is in the field of laser diagnostics and sensors, shock wave physics and chemistry, laser spectroscopy, chemical kinetics and combustion, and propulsion science. He is the author of three book chapters and over archival refereed 500 refereed archival papers in these areas, and has served as a member of the editorial advisory boards of Combustion Science and Technology, Progress in Energy and Combustion Science, Shock Waves, the International Journal of Chemical Kinetics, and the Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer. He has served as Chair of the Gordon Conference on Combustion Diagnostics, Chair of the Western States Section of the Combustion Institute, and as the Program Co-Chair for the 30th Symposium (International) on Combustion, and he was the Chairman of the Mechanical Engineering Department at Stanford University from 1993 to 2003. Professor Hanson has been the principal advisor for more than 95 PhD graduates.

  • Balaji Prabhakar

    Balaji Prabhakar

    Professor of Electrical Engineering and of Computer Science and, by courtesy, of Management Science and Engineering and of Operations, Information and Technology at the Graduate School of Business

    BioPrabhakar's research focuses on the design, analysis, and implementation of data networks: both wireline and wireless. He has been interested in designing network algorithms, problems in ad hoc wireless networks, and designing incentive mechanisms. He has a long-standing interest in stochastic network theory, information theory, algorithms, and probability theory.

  • Siegfried Hecker

    Siegfried Hecker

    Professor (Research) of Management Science and Engineering and Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interestsplutonium science; nuclear weapons stockpile stewardship; cooperative threat reduction

  • Khalid Aziz

    Khalid Aziz

    Otto N. Miller Professor in the School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOptimization and reservoir Simulation.

  • H.-S. Philip Wong

    H.-S. Philip Wong

    Willard R. and Inez Kerr Bell Professor in the School of Engineering

    BioWong joined Stanford in 2004 after 16 years at IBM Research, with appointments as research staff member, Manager, and Senior Manager. While at IBM, he was responsible for shaping and executing IBM's strategy on nanoscale science and technology and silicon technology. His interests are in the area of nanoscale science and technology, semiconductor technology, solid-state devices, and electronic imaging.

    His present research covers a broad range of topics including carbon electronics, 2D layered materials, wireless implantable biosensors, directed self-assembly, nanoelectromechanical relays, device modeling, brain-inspired computing, and non-volatile memory devices such as phase change memory and metal oxide resistance change memory.

  • Kenneth Goodson

    Kenneth Goodson

    Davies Family Provostial Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsHeat transfer in electronic nanostructures, energy conversion devices, microfluidic heat exchangers, and compact biological systems. At the nanoscale, we study thermal transport properties of thin films and nanostructures including thermoelectric converters and nanostransistors. At the microscale there is much interest in microfluidic heat exchangers involving phase change. At the milliscale there is an emphasis on electronic packaging materials including those for smart phones and tablets.

  • K. Armel

    K. Armel

    Social Science Research Associate, Precourt Energy Efficiency Center

    BioDr. Carrie Armel is a research associate at Stanford’s Precourt Energy Efficiency Center (PEEC) where she investigates the diverse ways in which an understanding of human behavior can lead to improvements in energy efficiency. For example, the application of behavioral principles can produce significant energy reductions through interventions implemented at the policy, technology, built environment, media/marketing, and organizational/community levels. Dr. Armel co-chairs the Behavior, Energy, and Climate Change Conference; oversees Precourt Institute’s Behavior and Energy Bibliographic Database and Website; and teaches courses on behavior and energy at Stanford.

    In addition to these initiatives, Dr. Armel develops specific energy efficiency interventions that apply behavioral and design principles, and develops measures to evaluate the efficacy of such interventions. Her most recent project involves a collaboration between academic and non-academic organizations to design and evaluate a technology that takes advantage of smart meters to provide feedback to residents on home electricity use.

    Dr. Armel completed a Ph.D. in Cognitive Neuroscience from the University of California at San Diego, and postdoctoral work in Neuro-Economics at Stanford. In these programs she employed behavioral, psychophysiological, and neuroscientific methods to investigate how affect and motivation influence behavior. She most recently completed postdoctoral work at Stanford’s School of Medicine, translating intervention techniques used in health promotion work into the domain of energy efficiency.

  • Anthony Kovscek

    Anthony Kovscek

    Keleen and Carlton Beal Professor of Petroleum Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch
    I am interested in the recovery of unconventional hydrocarbon resources and mitigating carbon emissions from fossil fuels via geological sequestration of greenhouse gases. My research group and I examine the physics of flow through porous media at length scales that vary from the pore to the laboratory to the reservoir. The organizing themes are flow imaging to delineate the mechanisms of multiphase flow (oil, water, and gas) in porous media and the synthesis of models from experimental, theoretical, and field data. In all of our work, physical observations, obtained mainly from laboratory and field measurements, are interwoven with theory.

    Teaching
    My teaching interests center broadly around education of students to meet the energy challenges that we will face this century. I teach undergraduate courses that examine the interplay of energy use and environmental issues including renewable energy resources and sustainability. At the graduate level, I offer classes on enhanced oil recovery and the thermodynamics of hydrocarbon mixtures.

    Professional Activities
    Member, American Geophysical Union (2006); Editorial Board, SPE Reservoir Evaluation and Engineering (2006-present); Society of Petroleum Engineers (SPE) Distinguished Achievement Award for Petroleum Engineering Faculty (2006); School of Earth Sciences Award for Excellence in Teaching (1998); Earth Systems Program Executive Committee (2002-present); Woods Institute for Environment Energy Committee (2005-present); SPE Continuing Education Committee (2000-present, chair 2004-05); steering committee chair, SPE Forum, Enhanced Oil Recovery: What's Next? (2005-06); Editorial Board of the Journal of Petroleum Technology (2004-present) and SPE Reservoir Engineering and Evaluation (2006-present); member, Society of Petroleum Engineers, American Geophysical Union, and the American Chemical Society.

  • Leonard Ortolano

    Leonard Ortolano

    UPS Foundation Professor of Civil Engineering in Urban and Regional Planning

    BioOrtolano is concerned with environmental and water resources policy and planning. His research stresses environmental policy implementation in developing countries and the role of non-governmental organizations in environmental management. His recent interests center on corporate environmental management.

  • Thomas Jaramillo

    Thomas Jaramillo

    Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering and of Photon Science

    BioRecent years have seen unprecedented motivation for the emergence of new energy technologies. Global dependence on fossil fuels, however, will persist until alternate technologies can compete economically. We must develop means to produce energy (or energy carriers) from renewable sources and then convert them to work as efficiently and cleanly as possible. Catalysis is energy conversion, and the Jaramillo laboratory focuses on fundamental catalytic processes occurring on solid-state surfaces in both the production and consumption of energy. Chemical-to-electrical and electrical-to-chemical energy conversion are at the core of the research. Nanoparticles, metals, alloys, sulfides, nitrides, carbides, phosphides, oxides, and biomimetic organo-metallic complexes comprise the toolkit of materials that can help change the energy landscape. Tailoring catalyst surfaces to fit the chemistry is our primary challenge.

  • Jerry Harris

    Jerry Harris

    The Cecil H. and Ida M. Green Professor in Geophysics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsBiographical Information
    Jerry M. Harris is the Cecil and Ida Green Professor of Geophysics and Associate Dean for the Office of Multicultural Affairs. He joined Stanford in 1988 following 11 years in private industry. He served five years as Geophysics department chair, was the Founding Director of the Stanford Center for Computational Earth and Environmental Science (CEES), and co-launched Stanford's Global Climate and Energy Project (GCEP). Graduates from Jerry's research group, the Stanford Wave Physics Lab, work in private industry, government labs, and universities.

    Research
    My research interests address the physics and dynamics of seismic and electromagnetic waves in complex media. My approach to these problems includes theory, numerical simulation, laboratory methods, and the analysis of field data. My group, collectively known as the Stanford Wave Physics Laboratory, specializes on high frequency borehole methods and low frequency labratory methods. We apply this research to the characterization and monitoring of petroleum and CO2 storage reservoirs.

    Teaching
    I teach courses on waves phenomena for borehole geophysics and tomography. I recently introduced and co-taught a new course on computational geosciences.

    Professional Activities
    I was the First Vice President of the Society of Exploration Geophysicists in 2003-04, and have served as the Distinguished Lecturer for the SPE, SEG, and AAPG.

  • James Sweeney

    James Sweeney

    Director, Precourt Center, Professor of Management Science & Engineering, Senior Fellow at Precourt Center and at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research and, by courtesy, at the Hoover Institution

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDeterminants of energy efficiency opportunities, barriers, and policy options. Emphasis on behavioral issues, including personal, corporate, or organizational. Behavior may be motivated by economic incentives, social, or cultural factors, or more generally, by a combination of these factors. Systems analysis questions of energy use.

  • Mark Horowitz

    Mark Horowitz

    Yahoo! Founders Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor of Computer Science

    BioProfessor Horowitz's initial work focused on designing high-performance digital systems by combining work in computer-aided design tools, circuit design, and system architecture. Dr. Horowitz's current research interests are quite broad and span using EE and CS analysis methods to problems in molecular biology to creating new design methodologies for analog and digital VLSI circuits. He has worked on many processor designs, from early RISC chips, to creating some of the first distributed shared memory multiprocessors, and is currently working on on-chip multiprocessor designs. Recently he has worked on a number of problems in computational photography. In 1990, he took leave from Stanford to help start Rambus Inc., a company designing high-bandwidth memory interface technology, and has continued work in high-speed I/O at Stanford. His current research includes updating both analog and digital design methods, low energy multiprocessor designs, computational photography, and applying engineering to biology.

  • Katharine (Kate) Maher

    Katharine (Kate) Maher

    Associate Professor of Earth System Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch
    Chemical reactions between fluids and minerals create the environments that are uniquely characteristic of Earth’s surface. For example, chemical weathering reactions support the growth of soils and organisms and regulate the flow of elements to the oceans. The rates of these reactions also control the release and storage of natural and human-derived contaminants. Over geologic timescales, mineral-fluid reactions have helped to maintain a mostly habitable planet. Over human timescales, these reactions will regulate our ability to use Earth’s resources, such as soils, waters, and minerals.

    My research focuses on the rates of reactions in different environments using a combination of geochemical tools, including isotope geochemistry, geochemical and hydrologic modeling, and geochronology in order to address the following themes: (1) defining the controls on mineral-fluid reactions rates in the environment (2) finding new approaches to use mineral-fluid reactions to safely store carbon dioxide in the subsurface; and (3) development of isotopic approaches to study mineral-fluid reactions in the environments of Earth’s past. To support these research themes, I have constructed a new mass spectrometer and clean lab facility capable of high precision geochemical and isotopic measurements, and teach a number of classes and short courses on reactive transport.

    Teaching
    My teaching focuses on introducing students to the questions and major challenges in low-temperature and environmental geochemistry, and the application of isotope geochemistry to environmental and geologic problems. In order to introduce incoming students to Earth surface processes, materials and geochemistry, I am also teaching a freshman seminar on forensic geoscience. At the graduate level, I offer classes on isotope geochemistry and modeling of environmental transformations and mass transfer processes (i.e., subsurface reactive transport).

  • David Lobell

    David Lobell

    Professor of Earth System Science and Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute and the Woods Institute for the Environment

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe study the interactions between food production, food security, and the environment using a range of modern tools.

  • Noah Diffenbaugh

    Noah Diffenbaugh

    Professor of Earth System Science and Kimmelman Family Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Noah S. Diffenbaugh is an Editor of the peer-review journal Geophysical Research Letters, and a Lead Author for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). He is a recipient of the James R. Holton Award from the American Geophysical Union, a CAREER award from the National Science Foundation, and a Terman Fellowship from Stanford University. He has also been recognized as a Kavli Fellow by the U.S. National Academy of Sciences, and as a Google Science Communication Fellow.

  • Aaron Lindenberg

    Aaron Lindenberg

    Associate Professor of Materials Science and Engineering and of Photon Science

    BioLindenberg's research is focused on visualizing the ultrafast dynamics and atomic-scale structure of materials on femtosecond and picosecond time-scales. X-ray techniques are combined with ultrafast optical techniques to provide a new way of taking snapshots of materials in motion. Current research is focused on the dynamics of phase transitions, ultrafast properties of nanoscale materials, and charge transport, with a focus on materials for information storage technologies, energy-related materials, and nanoscale optoelectronic devices.

  • Ramesh Johari

    Ramesh Johari

    Associate Professor of Management Science and Engineering and, by courtesy, of Computer Science and of Electrical Engineering

    BioJohari is interested in the design and management of large-scale complex networks, such as the Internet. Using tools from operations research, engineering, and economics, he has developed models to analyze efficient market mechanisms for resource allocation in networks.

  • Xiaolin Zheng

    Xiaolin Zheng

    Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering

    BioProfessor Zheng received her Ph.D. in Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering from Princeton University (2006), B.S. in Thermal Engineering from Tsinghua University (2000). Prior to joining Stanford in 2007, Professor Zheng did her postdoctoral work in the Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology at Harvard University. Professor Zheng is a member of MRS, ACS and combustion institute. Professor Zheng received the TR35 Award from the MIT Technology Review (2013), one of the 100 Leading Global Thinkers by the Foreign Policy Magazine (2013), 3M Nontenured Faculty Grant Award (2013), the Presidential Early Career Award (PECASE) from the white house (2009), Young Investigator Awards from the ONR (2008), DARPA (2008), Terman Fellowship from Stanford (2007), and Bernard Lewis Fellowship from the Combustion Institute (2004).

  • Stephen Boyd

    Stephen Boyd

    Samsung Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor, by courtesy, of Computer Science and of Management Science and Engineering

    BioStephen P. Boyd is the Samsung Professor of Engineering, and Professor of Electrical Engineering in the Information Systems Laboratory at Stanford University. He has courtesy appointments in the Department of Management Science and Engineering and the Department of Computer Science, and is member of the Institute for Computational and Mathematical Engineering. His current research focus is on convex optimization applications in control, signal processing, machine learning, and finance.

    Professor Boyd received an AB degree in Mathematics, summa cum laude, from Harvard University in 1980, and a PhD in EECS from U. C. Berkeley in 1985. In 1985 he joined the faculty of Stanford's Electrical Engineering Department. He has held visiting Professor positions at Katholieke University (Leuven), McGill University (Montreal), Ecole Polytechnique Federale (Lausanne), Tsinghua University (Beijing), Universite Paul Sabatier (Toulouse), Royal Institute of Technology (Stockholm), Kyoto University, Harbin Institute of Technology, NYU, MIT, UC Berkeley, CUHK-Shenzhen, and IMT Lucca. He holds honorary doctorates from Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Stockholm, and Catholic University of Louvain (UCL).

    Professor Boyd is the author of many research articles and three books: Convex Optimization (with Lieven Vandenberghe, 2004), Linear Matrix Inequalities in System and Control Theory (with L. El Ghaoui, E. Feron, and V. Balakrishnan, 1994), and Linear Controller Design: Limits of Performance (with Craig Barratt, 1991). His group has produced many open source tools, including CVX (with Michael Grant), CVXPY (with Steven Diamond) and Convex.jl (with Madeleine Udell and others), widely used parser-solvers for convex optimization.

    Professor Boyd has received many awards and honors for his research in control systems engineering and optimization, including an ONR Young Investigator Award, a Presidential Young Investigator Award, and the AACC Donald P. Eckman Award. In 2013, he received the IEEE Control Systems Award, given for outstanding contributions to control systems engineering, science, or technology. In 2012, Michael Grant and he were given the Mathematical Optimization Society's Beale-Orchard-Hays Award, given every three years for excellence in computational mathematical programming. He is a Fellow of the IEEE, SIAM, and INFORMS, a Distinguished Lecturer of the IEEE Control Systems Society, and a member of the National Academy of Engineering. He has been invited to deliver more than 90 plenary and keynote lectures at major conferences in control, optimization, signal processing, and machine learning.

    He has developed and taught many undergraduate and graduate courses, including Signals & Systems, Linear Dynamical Systems, Convex Optimization, and a recent undergraduate course on Matrix Methods. His graduate convex optimization course attracts around 300 students from more than 20 departments. In 1991 he received an ASSU Graduate Teaching Award, and in 1994 he received the Perrin Award for Outstanding Undergraduate Teaching in the School of Engineering. In 2003, he received the AACC Ragazzini Education award, for contributions to control education, with citation: “For excellence in classroom teaching, textbook and monograph preparation, and undergraduate and graduate mentoring of students in the area of systems, control, and optimization.” In 2016 he received the Walter J. Gores award, the highest award for teaching at Stanford University. In 2017 he received the IEEE James H. Mulligan, Jr. Education Medal, for a career of outstanding contributions to education in the fields of interest of IEEE, with citation "For inspirational education of students and researchers in the theory and application of optimization."

  • Jennifer Dionne

    Jennifer Dionne

    Associate Professor of Materials Science and Engineering

    BioJen Dionne's research investigates metamaterials - engineered materials with optical and electrical properties not found in nature. She is especially interested in plasmonic and colloidal nanocrystal-based metamaterials, including their fundamental electrodynamic properties and applications to solar energy and bioimaging. Active research areas in her group include visible-frequency metamaterials for subwavelength light manipulation, enhanced photovoltaics and photocatalysis, and active neuronal imaging.