Precourt Institute for Energy


Showing 101-110 of 130 Results

  • Nancy Sandoval

    Nancy Sandoval

    Executive Assistant, Global Climate and Energy Project (G-CEP)

    BioNancy is the executive assistant to Sally Benson, Director of both the Precourt Institute for Energy and the Global Climate and Energy Project (GCEP). She supports her in all facets of her day-to-day working and administrative roles.

    Nancy started at Stanford University in 2003 with the inception of GCEP and is known as “GCEP Employee #1.” Before joining Stanford, she worked for many years as an administrative assistant at the U.S. Geological Survey in Menlo Park. She has a daughter and a son who are both graduates of Stanford University.

  • Krishna Saraswat

    Krishna Saraswat

    Rickey/Nielsen Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor, by courtesy, of Materials Science and Engineering

    BioSaraswat is working on a variety of problems related to new and innovative materials, structures, and process technology of silicon, germanium and III-V devices and interconnects for VLSI and nanoelectronics. Areas of his current interest are: new device structures to continue scaling MOS transistors, DRAMs and flash memories to nanometer regime, 3-dimentional ICs with multiple layers of heterogeneous devices, metal and optical interconnections and high efficiency and low cost solar cells.

  • Richard Sassoon

    Richard Sassoon

    Managing Director, Global Climate and Energy Project (G-CEP)

    BioRichard E. Sassoon was appointed GCEP Managing Director in November 2003 and brings over 25 years of research and management experience in the fields of physical and analytical chemistry, as well as energy sciences to this position.

    Prior to joining GCEP, Dr. Sassoon was Senior Scientist and Assistant Vice President at Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC), where he led systems integration efforts for nanotechnology applications. For many years, he was a contractor to the Department of Energy supporting the strategic planning and management of its environmental programs, and its hydrogen and renewable energy activities.

    Dr. Sassoon spent over a decade conducting research into photochemical solar energy conversion and storage systems, performing computer modeling of the catalytic processes involved in hydrogen production, and investigating technologies for cleanup of nuclear waste.

    Dr. Sassoon received his B.Sc. in Chemistry from Leeds University in the UK, and his Ph.D. in Physical Chemistry from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem in Israel. He conducted his post-doctoral activities at the University of Notre Dame. Dr. Sassoon has authored over 15 research papers in peer-reviewed journals, has received several awards including the Gabriel Stein award for outstanding research during his Ph.D. studies, and is a member of the American Chemical Society.

  • Alicia Seiger

    Alicia Seiger

    Deputy Director, Steyer Taylor Center For Energy Policy & Finance, Steyer-Taylor Center Energy Policy & Finance

    Current Role at StanfordLecturer, Stanford Law School; Deputy Director Steyer-Taylor Center for Energy Policy and Finance; Managing Director, Precourt Institute Sustainable Finance Initiative.

  • Debbie Senesky

    Debbie Senesky

    Assistant Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    BioDebbie G. Senesky is an Assistant Professor at Stanford University in the Aeronautics and Astronautics Department and by courtesy, the Electrical Engineering Department. In addition, she is the Principal Investigator of the EXtreme Environment Microsystems Laboratory (XLab). Her research interests include the development of nanomaterials for extreme harsh environments, high-temperature electronics, and robust instrumentation for Venus exploration. In the past, she has held positions at GE Sensing (formerly known as NovaSensor), GE Global Research Center, and Hewlett Packard. She received the B.S. degree (2001) in mechanical engineering from the University of Southern California. She received the M.S. degree (2004) and Ph.D. degree (2007) in mechanical engineering from the University of California, Berkeley. Prof. Senesky recently chaired the 2018 Women in Aerospace Symposium (WIA2018) at Stanford University. She has served on the technical program committee of the IEEE International Electron Devices Meeting (IEEE IEDM), International Conference on Solid-State Sensors, Actuators, and Microsystems (Transducers), and International Symposium on Sensor Science (I3S). She is currently the co-editor of three technical journals: IEEE Electron Device Letters, Sensors, and Micromachines. In addition, she currently serves on the board of directors of the non-profit organization Scientific Adventures for Girls. In recognition of her research, she received the Emerging Leader Abie Award from AnitaB.org in 2018, Early Faculty Career Award from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) in 2012, Gabilan Faculty Fellowship Award in 2012, and Sloan Ph.D. Fellowship from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation in 2004.

    Prof. Senesky's career path and research has been featured on the People Behind the Science podcast, the Future of Everything radio show, Space.com, and NPR's Tell Me More program. More information about Prof. Senesky can be found at https://xlab.stanford.edu, on Instagram (@debbiesenesky), and on Twitter (@debbiesenesky).

  • Zhi-Xun Shen

    Zhi-Xun Shen

    Paul Pigott Professor in Physical Sciences, Professor of Photon Science, of Physics and Senior Fellow at the Precourt Institute for Energy

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Shen's main research interest lies in the area of condensed matter and materials physics, as well as the applications of materials and devices. He develops photon based innovative instrumentation and advanced experimental techniques, ranging from angle-resolved photoemission to microwave imaging, soft x-ray scattering and time domain spectroscopy and scattering. He has created a body of literature that advanced our understanding of quantum materials, including superconductors, semiconductors, novel magnets, topological insulators, novel carbon and electron emitters. He is best known for his discoveries of the momentum structure of anisotropic d-wave pairing gap and anomalous normal state pseudogap in high temperature superconductors. He has further leveraged the advanced characterization tool to make better materials through thin film and interface engineering.

  • Olav Solgaard

    Olav Solgaard

    Professor of Electrical Engineering

    BioThe Solgaard group focus on design and fabrication of nano-photonics and micro-optical systems. We combine photonic crystals, optical meta-materials, silicon photonics, and MEMS, to create efficient and reliable systems for communication, sensing, imaging, and optical manipulation.

  • Andrew Spakowitz

    Andrew Spakowitz

    Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering and of Materials Science and Engineering and, by courtesy, of Applied Physics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsTheory and computation of biological processes and complex materials

  • Alfred M. Spormann

    Alfred M. Spormann

    Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering, of Chemical Engineering and, by courtesy, of Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMetabolism of anaerobic microbes in diseases, bioenergy, and bioremediation

  • Jonathan Stebbins

    Jonathan Stebbins

    Professor of Geological Sciences and, by courtesy, of Materials Science and Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly Interestsstructure and dynamics of crystalline, glassy, and molten inorganic materials and how these relate to geologically and technologically important properties and processes; solid state Nuclear Magnetic Resoance (NMR); mineralogy; igneous petrology; glass science