Precourt Institute for Energy


Showing 11-20 of 140 Results

  • Michael G. Borja

    Michael G. Borja

    Finance and Administration Manager, Precourt Institute for Energy

    BioA native to the Central Valley, Michael G. Borja developed a career focus within the realm of finance during his undergrad experience at UC Davis, earning a BS in Economics. Borja started his Stanford career working in first and second year student programs as part of the Business Team for Stanford Introductory Studies with the Vice Provost Office for Undergraduate Education (VPUE). After 3 gainful years, he transitioned into the dynamic workspace at Stanford Energy. With keen value for the Stanford University mission, and as a contributing staff member to the Precourt Institute for Energy, Michael G. Borja is proud to provide expertise for support of the organization's several upcoming and truly groundbreaking achievements. Take a look @ energy.stanford.edu

  • Stephen Boyd

    Stephen Boyd

    Samsung Professor in the School of Engineering

    BioStephen P. Boyd is the Samsung Professor of Engineering, and Professor of Electrical Engineering in the Information Systems Laboratory at Stanford University. He has courtesy appointments in the Department of Management Science and Engineering and the Department of Computer Science, and is member of the Institute for Computational and Mathematical Engineering. His current research focus is on convex optimization applications in control, signal processing, machine learning, and finance.

    Professor Boyd received an AB degree in Mathematics, summa cum laude, from Harvard University in 1980, and a PhD in EECS from U. C. Berkeley in 1985. In 1985 he joined Stanford's Electrical Engineering Department. He has held visiting Professor positions at Katholieke University (Leuven), McGill University (Montreal), Ecole Polytechnique Federale (Lausanne), Tsinghua University (Beijing), Universite Paul Sabatier (Toulouse), Royal Institute of Technology (Stockholm), Kyoto University, Harbin Institute of Technology, NYU, MIT, UC Berkeley, CUHK-Shenzhen, and IMT Lucca. He holds honorary doctorates from Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Stockholm, and Catholic University of Louvain (UCL).

    Professor Boyd is the author of many research articles and four books: Introduction to Applied Linear Algebra: Vectors, Matrices, and Least-Squares (with Lieven Vandenberghe, 2018), Convex Optimization (with Lieven Vandenberghe, 2004), Linear Matrix Inequalities in System and Control Theory (with El Ghaoui, Feron, and Balakrishnan, 1994), and Linear Controller Design: Limits of Performance (with Craig Barratt, 1991). His group has produced many open source tools, including CVX (with Michael Grant), CVXPY (with Steven Diamond) and Convex.jl (with Madeleine Udell and others), widely used parser-solvers for convex optimization.

    Professor Boyd has received many awards and honors for his research in control systems engineering and optimization, including an ONR Young Investigator Award, a Presidential Young Investigator Award, and the AACC Donald P. Eckman Award. In 2013, he received the IEEE Control Systems Award, given for outstanding contributions to control systems engineering, science, or technology. In 2012, Michael Grant and he were given the Mathematical Optimization Society's Beale-Orchard-Hays Award, for excellence in computational mathematical programming. He is a Fellow of the IEEE, SIAM, and INFORMS, a Distinguished Lecturer of the IEEE Control Systems Society, a member of the US National Academy of Engineering, a foreign member of the Chinese Academy of Engineering, and a foreign member of the National Academy of Engineering of Korea. He has been invited to deliver more than 90 plenary and keynote lectures at major conferences in control, optimization, signal processing, and machine learning.

    He has developed and taught many undergraduate and graduate courses, including Signals & Systems, Linear Dynamical Systems, Convex Optimization, and a recent undergraduate course on Matrix Methods. His graduate convex optimization course attracts around 300 students from more than 20 departments. In 1991 he received an ASSU Graduate Teaching Award, and in 1994 he received the Perrin Award for Outstanding Undergraduate Teaching in the School of Engineering. In 2003, he received the AACC Ragazzini Education award, for contributions to control education, with citation: “For excellence in classroom teaching, textbook and monograph preparation, and undergraduate and graduate mentoring of students in the area of systems, control, and optimization.” In 2016 he received the Walter J. Gores award, the highest award for teaching at Stanford University. In 2017 he received the IEEE James H. Mulligan, Jr. Education Medal, for a career of outstanding contributions to education in the fields of interest of IEEE, with citation "For inspirational education of students and researchers in the theory and application of optimization."

  • Adam Brandt

    Adam Brandt

    Associate Professor of Energy Resources Engineering and Senior Fellow at the Precourt Institute for Energy

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsGreenhouse gas emissions, energy systems optimization, mathematical modeling of resource depletion, life cycle analysis

  • Mark Brongersma

    Mark Brongersma

    Stephen Harris Professor and Professor of Materials Science and Engineering and, by courtesy, of Applied Physics

    BioMark Brongersma is a Professor in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at Stanford University. He received his PhD in Materials Science from the FOM Institute in Amsterdam, The Netherlands, in 1998. From 1998-2001 he was a postdoctoral research fellow at the California Institute of Technology. During this time, he coined the term “Plasmonics” for a new device technology that exploits the unique optical properties of nanoscale metallic structures to route and manipulate light at the nanoscale. His current research is directed towards the development and physical analysis of nanostructured materials that find application in nanoscale electronic and photonic devices. Brongersma received a National Science Foundation Career Award, the Walter J. Gores Award for Excellence in Teaching, the International Raymond and Beverly Sackler Prize in the Physical Sciences (Physics) for his work on plasmonics, and is a Fellow of the Optical Society of America, the SPIE, and the American Physical Society.

  • Thomas Byers

    Thomas Byers

    Entrepreneurship Professor in the School of Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsApplied ethics, responsible innovation, and global entrepreneurship education (see http://peak.stanford.edu).

  • Brian Cantwell

    Brian Cantwell

    Edward C. Wells Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Emeritus

    BioProfessor Cantwell's research interests are in the area of turbulent flow. Recent work has centered in three areas: the direct numerical simulation of turbulent shear flows, theoretical studies of the fine-scale structure of turbulence, and experimental measurements of turbulent structure in flames. Experimental studies include the development of particle-tracking methods for measuring velocity fields in unsteady flames and variable density jets. Research in turbulence simulation includes the development of spectral methods for simulating vortex rings, the development of topological methods for interpreting complex fields of data, and simulations of high Reynolds number compressible and incompressible wakes. Theoretical studies include predictions of the asymptotic behavior of drifting vortex pairs and vortex rings and use of group theoretical methods to study the nonlinear dynamics of turbulent fine-scale motions. Current projects include studies of fast-burning fuels for hybrid propulsion and decomposition of nitrous oxide for space propulsion.

  • Jimmy Chen

    Jimmy Chen

    Managing Director, SECA - Stanford Energy Corporate Affiliates, Precourt Institute for Energy

    BioJimmy Chen is responsible for developing and managing the Stanford Energy Corporate Affiliate (SECA) program, and establishing engagements for corporations and other organizations that have an interest in collaborating with Stanford on energy and energy-related research. As Managing Director of SECA, he serves as a Director for Stanford’s Precourt Institute for Energy. Besides previously being the founding Managing Director for the Precourt Institute’s Bits and Watts Initiative, he currently serves the Managing Director of the Stanford StorageX Initiative and is on the leadership team of the Stanford Hydrogen Focus Group.

    He has a broad background in energy and technology, specializing in technology and product development. He has held technical positions at Lawrence Berkeley Labs, GTE Labs, and AT&T Bell Labs, and technology executive positions at both start-ups and Fortune 500 companies, including FormFactor and Eaton.

    His teaching responsibilities include lecturing for Stanford’s Materials Science & Engineering department, and launching a Hydrogen Seminar Course in Energy Resources Engineering. He received his PhD degree from MIT and his MS degree from the University of California, Berkeley both in materials science and engineering, and his BS degree from the University of California, Berkeley in electrical engineering.

  • Christopher Chidsey

    Christopher Chidsey

    Associate Professor of Chemistry, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe Chidsey group research interest is to build the chemical base for molecular electronics. To accomplish this, we synthesize the molecular and nanoscopic systems, build the analytical tools and develop the theoretical understanding with which to study electron transfer between electrodes and among redox species through insulating molecular bridges

  • Esther Choi

    Esther Choi

    Research Fellow, Precourt Institute for Energy

    BioEsther Choi is a Research Fellow at the Sustainable Finance Initiative (SFI) of the Precourt Institute for Energy at Stanford University. Her current research focuses on the role of blended finance in securing decarbonization pathways for emerging and developing countries. Her work has included topics such as policies and politics of climate change, green growth strategies and plans, and governance design for sustainable development.

    Esther holds a PhD in Environmental Science, Policy, and Management from the University of California, Berkeley and a Master’s in Environmental Management from Yale University. She has a variety of research and policy experience through her work at the Green Climate Fund, the World Bank, the Global Green Growth Institute, and KPMG Advisory Services.