Stanford ChEM-H


Showing 1-10 of 13 Results

  • Jan Carette

    Jan Carette

    Assistant Professor of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur research focuses on the identification of host genes that play critical roles in the pathogenesis of infectious agents including viruses. We use haploid genetic screens in human cells as an efficient approach to perform loss-of-function studies. Besides obtaining fundamental insights on how viruses hijack cellular processes and on host defense mechanisms, it may also facilitate the development of new therapeutic strategies.

  • Lynette Cegelski

    Lynette Cegelski

    Assistant Professor of Chemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur research program integrates chemistry, biology, and physics to investigate the assembly and function of macromolecular and whole-cell systems. The genomics and proteomics revolutions have been enormously successful in generating crucial "parts lists" for biological systems. Yet, for many fascinating systems, formidable challenges exist in building complete descriptions of how the parts function and assemble into macromolecular complexes and whole-cell factories. We are inspired by the need for new and unconventional approaches to solve these outstanding problems and to drive the discovery of new therapeutics for human disease.

    Our approach is different from the more conventional protein-structure determinations of structural biology. We employ biophysical and biochemical tools, and are designing new strategies using solid-state NMR spectroscopy to examine assemblies such as amyloid fibers, bacterial cell walls, whole cells, and biofilms. We would like to understand at a molecular and atomic level how bacteria self-assemble extracellular structures, including functional amyloid fibers termed curli, and how bacteria use such building blocks to construct organized biofilm architectures. We also employ a chemical genetics approach to recruit small molecules as tools to interrupt and interrogate the temporal and spatial events during assembly processes and to develop new strategies to prevent and treat infectious diseases. Overall, our approach is multi-pronged and provides training opportunities for students interested in research at the chemistry-biology interface.

  • Howard Y. Chang, MD PhD

    Howard Y. Chang, MD PhD

    Virginia and D. K. Ludwig Professor of Cancer Genomics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur research is focused on how the activities of hundreds or even thousands of genes (gene parties) are coordinated to achieve biological meaning. We have pioneered methods to predict, dissect, and control large-scale gene regulatory programs; these methods have provided insights into human development, cancer, and aging.

  • Ovijit Chaudhuri

    Ovijit Chaudhuri

    Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering

    BioOur group's research is focused at the intersection of mechanics and biology. We are interested in elucidating the underlying molecular mechanisms that give rise to the complex mechanical properties of cells, extracellular matrices, and tissues . Conversely, we are investigating how complex mechanical cues influence important biological processes such as cell division, differentiation, or cancer progression. Our approaches involve using force measurement instrumentation, such as atomic force microscopy, to exert and measure forces on materials and cells at the nanoscale, and the development of material systems for 3D cell culture that allow precise and independent manipulation of mechanical properties.

  • James K. Chen

    James K. Chen

    Professor of Chemical and Systems Biology and of Developmental Biology and, by courtesy, of Chemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur laboratory combines synthetic chemistry and developmental biology to investigate the molecular events that regulate embryonic patterning, tissue regeneration, and tumorigenesis. We are currently using genetic and small-molecule approaches to study the molecular mechanisms of Hedgehog signaling, and we are developing chemical technologies to perturb and observe the genetic programs that underlie vertebrate development.

  • Gilbert Chu

    Gilbert Chu

    Professor of Medicine (Oncology) and of Biochemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur laboratory seeks to understand how cells repair DNA damage. We currently focus on how non-homologous end joining proteins assemble on DNA ends to juxtapose them for repair of DNA double-strand breaks.

    We are collaborating in the development of a point-of-care device to measure ammonia from a drop of blood. The device will facilitate diagnosis and management of urea cycle defects, liver disease, and chemobrain due to elevated ammonia.

  • Karlene Cimprich

    Karlene Cimprich

    Professor of Chemical and Systems Biology and, by courtesy, of Chemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsGenomic instability contributes to many diseases, but it also underlies many natural processes. The Cimprich lab is focused on understanding how mammalian cells maintain genomic stability in the context of DNA replication stress and DNA damage. We are interested in the molecular mechanisms underlying the cellular response to replication stress and DNA damage as well as the links between DNA damage and replication stress to human disease.

  • Jennifer R. Cochran

    Jennifer R. Cochran

    Shriram Chair of Bioengineering, Associate Professor of Bioengineering and, by courtesy, of Chemical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMolecular Bioengineering, Protein Biochemistry, Biotechnology, Cell and Tissue Engineering, Molecular Imaging, Chemical Biology

  • Markus Covert

    Markus Covert

    Associate Professor of Bioengineering and, by courtesy, of Chemical and Systems Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur focus is on building computational models of complex biological processes, and using them to guide an experimental program. Such an approach leads to a relatively rapid identification and validation of previously unknown components and interactions. Biological systems of interest include metabolic, regulatory and signaling networks as well as cell-cell interactions. Current research involves the dynamic behavior of NF-kappaB, an important family of transcription factors.