Stanford ChEM-H


Showing 1-7 of 7 Results

  • Jin Billy Li

    Jin Billy Li

    Associate Professor of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsRNA editing: identification, regulation, and function

  • Lingyin Li

    Lingyin Li

    Assistant Professor of Biochemistry

    BioDr. Li is an assistant professor in the Biochemistry Department and ChEM-H Institute at Stanford since 2015. Her lab works on understanding biochemical mechanisms of innate immunity and harnessing it to treat cancer. She majored in chemistry at University of Science and Technology of China and graduated with a B. En in 2003. She then trained with Dr. Laura Kiessling, a pioneer in chemical biology, at University of Wisconsin-Madison and graduated with a Ph.D in chemistry in 2010. She obtained her postdoctoral training with Dr. Timothy Mitchison at Harvard Medical School, who introduced her to the field of chemical immunology.

  • Kyle Loh

    Kyle Loh

    Assistant Professor of Developmental Biology (Stem Cell)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe have developed a strategy to generate fairly pure populations of various human tissue progenitors in a dish from embryonic stem cells (ESCs). We have delineated the sequential lineage steps through which ESCs diversify into various tissues, and in so doing, developed methods to exclusively induce certain fates at the expense of others. The resultant pure populations of tissue progenitors are the fundamental building blocks for regenerative medicine.

  • Jonathan Z. Long

    Jonathan Z. Long

    Assistant Professor of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy laboratory studies the molecular pathways that control mammalian energy homeostasis. We focus on the dynamic chemical signals that integrate environmental cues with metabolic tissue function. What are the identities of these signals? How do their levels change in response to physiologic energy stressors? Where are they made? What cell types or tissues do they act on? To answer these questions, we use mass spectrometry-based technologies as discovery tools. We combine these tools with classical biochemical and genetic techniques in cellular and animal models. Our goal is to discover new molecules and signaling pathways that regulate organismal energy metabolism. Ultimately, we seek to translate our discoveries into therapeutic opportunities for metabolic and other chronic diseases.

  • Sharon R. Long

    Sharon R. Long

    William C. Steere, Jr. - Pfizer Inc. Professor in Biological Sciences and Professor, by courtesy, of Biochemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsBiochemistry, genetics and cell biology of plant-bacterial symbiosis

  • Anson Lowe

    Anson Lowe

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Gastroenterology and Hepatology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe laboratory is focused on the relationship between injury, wound healing, and cancer. Esophageal, gastric, and pancreatic cancers are a focus. We are particularly interested in the regulation of cell signaling by EGFR, the EGF receptor. In addition to cancer pathogenesis, active projects include the development of new diagnostic assays and drugs.

  • Liqun Luo

    Liqun Luo

    Ann and Bill Swindells Professor in the School of Humanities and Sciences and Professor, by courtesy, of Neurobiology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe are studying how neural circuits are assembled during development, and how they contribute to sensory perception. We are addressing these questions at different levels from molecular, cellular, circuit to animal behavior. We are primarily using Drosophila as a model organism for our studies. Most recently, we are also developing novel genetic tools in the mouse to extend our studies to the mammalian brain.