Stanford ChEM-H


Showing 51-100 of 126 Results

  • Keith Hodgson

    Keith Hodgson

    David Mulvane Ehrsam and Edward Curtis Franklin Professor of Chemistry and Professor of Photon Science at SLAC

    BioCombining inorganic, biophysical and structural chemistry, Professor Keith Hodgson investigates how structure at molecular and macromolecular levels relates to function. Studies in the Hodgson lab have pioneered the use of synchrotron x-radiation to probe the electronic and structural environment of biomolecules. Recent efforts focus on the applications of x-ray diffraction, scattering and absorption spectroscopy to examine metalloproteins that are important in Earth’s biosphere, such as those that convert nitrogen to ammonia or methane to methanol.

    Keith O. Hodgson was born in Virginia in 1947. He studied chemistry at the University of Virginia (B.S. 1969) and University of California, Berkeley (Ph.D. 1972), with a postdoctoral year at the ETH in Zurich. He joined the Stanford Chemistry Department faculty in 1973, starting up a program of fundamental research into the use of x-rays to study chemical and biological structure that made use of the unique capabilities of the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL). His lab carried out pioneering x-ray absorption and x-ray crystallographic studies of proteins, laying the foundation for a new field now in broad use worldwide. In the early eighties, he began development of one of the world's first synchrotron-based structural molecular biology research and user programs, centered at SSRL. He served as SSRL Director from 1998 to 2005, and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC) Deputy Director (2005-2007) and Associate Laboratory Director for Photon Science (2007-2011).

    Today the Hodgson research group investigates how molecular structure at different organizational levels relates to biological and chemical function, using a variety of x-ray absorption, diffraction and scattering techniques. Typical of these molecular structural studies are investigations of metal ions as active sites of biomolecules. His research group develops and utilizes techniques such as x-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy (XAS and XES) to study the electronic and metrical details of a given metal ion in the biomolecule under a variety of natural conditions.

    A major area of focus over many years, the active site of the enzyme nitrogenase is responsible for conversion of atmospheric di-nitrogen to ammonia. Using XAS studies at the S, Fe and Mo edge, the Hodgson group has worked to understand the electronic structure as a function of redox in this cluster. They have developed new methods to study long distances in the cluster within and outside the protein. Studies are ongoing to learn how this cluster functions during catalysis and interacts with substrates and inhibitors. Other components of the protein are also under active study.

    Additional projects include the study of iron in dioxygen activation and oxidation within the binuclear iron-containing enzyme methane monooxygenase and in cytochrome oxidase. Lab members are also investigating the role of copper in electron transport and in dioxygen activation. Other studies include the electronic structure of iron-sulfur clusters in models and enzymes.

    The research group is also focusing on using the next generation of x-ray light sources, the free electron laser. Such a light source, called the LCLS, is also located at SLAC. They are also developing new approaches using x-ray free electron laser radiation to image noncrystalline biomolecules and study chemical reactivity on ultrafast time scales.

  • Michael R. Howitt

    Michael R. Howitt

    Assistant Professor of Pathology and of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur lab is broadly interested in how intestinal microbes shape our immune system to promote both health and disease. Recently we discovered that a type of intestinal epithelial cell, called tuft cells, act as sentinels stationed along the lining of the gut. Tuft cells respond to microbes, including parasites, to initiate type 2 immunity, remodel the epithelium, and alter gut physiology. Surprisingly, these changes to the intestine rely on the same chemosensory pathway found in oral taste cells. Currently, we aim to 1) elucidate the role of specific tuft cell receptors in microbial detection. 2) To understand how protozoa and bacteria within the microbiota impact host immunity. 3) Discover how tuft cells modulate surrounding cells and tissue.

  • KC Huang

    KC Huang

    Professor of Bioengineering and of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsHow do cells determine their shape and grow?
    How do molecules inside cells get to the right place at the right time?

    Our group tries to answer these questions using a systems biology approach, in which we integrate interacting networks of protein and lipids with the physical forces determined by the spatial geometry of the cell. We use theoretical and computational techniques to make predictions that we can verify experimentally using synthetic, chemical, or genetic perturbations.

  • Ngan F. Huang

    Ngan F. Huang

    Assistant Professor of Cardiothoracic Surgery (Cardiothoracic Surgery Research)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Huang's laboratory aims to understand the chemical and mechanical interactions between extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins and pluripotent stem cells that regulate vascular and myogenic differentiation. The fundamental insights of cell-matrix interactions are applied towards stem cell-based therapies with respect to improving cell survival and regenerative capacity, as well as engineered vascularized tissues for therapeutic transplantation.

  • Possu Huang

    Possu Huang

    Assistant Professor of Bioengineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsProtein design: molecular engineering, method development and novel therapeutics

  • Juliana Idoyaga

    Juliana Idoyaga

    Assistant Professor of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe Idoyaga Lab is focused on the function and biology of dendritic cells, which are specialized antigen-presenting cells that initiate and modulate our body’s immune responses. Considering their importance in orchestrating the quality and quantity of immune responses, dendritic cells are an indisputable target for vaccines and therapies.

    Dendritic cells are not one cell type, but a network of cells comprised of many subsets or subpopulations with distinct developmental pathways and tissue localization. It is becoming apparent that each dendritic cell subset is different in its capacity to induce and modulate specific types of immune responses; however, there is still a lack of resolution and deep understanding of dendritic cell subset functional specialization. This gap in knowledge is an impediment for the rational design of immune interventions. Our research program focuses on advancing our understanding of mouse and human dendritic cell subsets, revealing their endowed capacity to induce distinct types of immune responses, and designing novel strategies to exploit them for vaccines and therapies.

  • Peter K.  Jackson

    Peter K.  Jackson

    Professor of Microbiology and Immunology (Baxter Labs)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCell cycle and cyclin control of DNA replication .

  • Christine Jacobs-Wagner

    Christine Jacobs-Wagner

    Dennis Cunningham Professor and Professor of Biology

    BioChristine Jacobs-Wagner is a Dennis Cunningham Professor in the Department of Biology and the ChEM-H Institute at Stanford University. She is interested in understanding the fundamental mechanisms and principles by which cells, and, in particular, bacterial cells, are able to multiple. She received her PhD in Biochemistry in 1996 from the University of Liège, Belgium where she unraveled a molecular mechanism by which some bacterial pathogens sense and respond to antibiotics attack to achieve resistance. For this work, she received multiple awards including the 1997 GE & Science Prize for Young Life Scientists. During her postdoctoral work at Stanford Medical School, she demonstrated that bacteria can localize regulatory proteins to specific intracellular regions to control signal transduction and the cell cycle, uncovering a new, unsuspected level of bacterial regulation.

    She started her own lab at Yale University in 2001. Over the years, her group made major contributions in the emerging field of bacterial cell biology and provided key molecular insights into the temporal and spatial mechanisms involved in cell morphogenesis, cell polarization, chromosome segregation and cell cycle control. For her distinguished work, she received the Pew Scholars award from the Pew Charitable Trust, the Woman in Cell Biology Junior award from the American Society of Cell Biology and the Eli Lilly award from the American Society of Microbiology. She held the Maxine F. Singer and William H. Fleming professor chairs at Yale. She was elected to the Connecticut academy of Science, the American Academy of Microbiology and the National Academy of Sciences. She has been an investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute since 2008.

    Her lab moved to Stanford in 2019. Current research examines the general principles and spatiotemporal mechanisms by which bacterial cells replicate, using Caulobacter crescentus and Escherichia coli as models. Recently, the Jacobs-Wagner lab expanded their interests to the Lyme disease agent Borrelia burgdorferi, revealing unsuspected ways by which this pathogen grows and causes disease

  • Daniel Jarosz

    Daniel Jarosz

    Associate Professor of Chemical and Systems Biology and of Developmental Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy laboratory studies conformational switches in evolution, disease, and development. We focus on how molecular chaperones, proteins that help other biomolecules to fold, affect the phenotypic output of genetic variation. To do so we combine classical biochemistry and genetics with systems-level approaches. Ultimately we seek to understand how homeostatic mechanisms influence the acquisition of biological novelty and identify means of manipulating them for therapeutic and biosynthetic benefit.

  • Paul A. Khavari, MD, PhD

    Paul A. Khavari, MD, PhD

    Carl J. Herzog Professor in Dermatology in the School of Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe work in epithelial tissue as a model system to study stem cell biology, cancer and new molecular therapeutics. Epithelia cover external and internal body surfaces and undergo constant self-renewal while responding to diverse environmental stimuli. Epithelial homeostasis precisely balances stem cell-sustained proliferation and differentiation-associated cell death, a balance which is lost in many human diseases, including cancer, 90% of which arise in epithelial tissues.

  • Chaitan Khosla

    Chaitan Khosla

    Director, ChEM-H, Wells H. Rauser and Harold M. Petiprin Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor of Chemistry and, by courtesy, of Biochemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch in this laboratory focuses on problems where deep insights into enzymology and metabolism can be harnessed to improve human health.

    For the past two decades, we have studied and engineered enzymatic assembly lines called polyketide synthases that catalyze the biosynthesis of structurally complex and medicinally fascinating antibiotics in bacteria. An example of such an assembly line is found in the erythromycin biosynthetic pathway. Our current focus is on understanding the structure and mechanism of this polyketide synthase. At the same time, we are developing methods to decode the vast and growing number of orphan polyketide assembly lines in the sequence databases.

    For more than a decade, we have also investigated the pathogenesis of celiac disease, an autoimmune disorder of the small intestine, with the goal of discovering therapies and related management tools for this widespread but overlooked disease. Ongoing efforts focus on understanding the pivotal role of transglutaminase 2 in triggering the inflammatory response to dietary gluten in the celiac intestine.

  • Peter S. Kim

    Peter S. Kim

    Virginia and D. K. Ludwig Professor of Biochemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe are studying the mechanism of viral membrane fusion and its inhibition by drugs and antibodies. We use the HIV envelope protein (gp120/gp41) as a model system. Some of our studies are aimed at creating an HIV vaccine. We are also characterizing protein surfaces that are referred to as "non-druggable". These surfaces are defined empirically based on failure to identify small, drug-like molecules that bind to them with high affinity and specificity.

  • Eric Kool

    Eric Kool

    The George A. and Hilda M. Daubert Professor in Chemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests• Development of cell-permeable reagents for study and modification of RNAs
    • Developing small-molecule probes of DNA repair pathways
    • Design of a functional new genetic set, xDNA and xRNA (structure, function, applications)
    • Synthesis of combinatorial fluorescent assemblies built on a DNA scaffold (oligodeoxyfluorosides, ODFs) as labels and sensors for biology and medicine

  • Jin Billy Li

    Jin Billy Li

    Associate Professor of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe Li Lab is primarily interested in RNA editing mediated by ADAR enzymes. We co-discovered that the major function of RNA editing is to label endogenous dsRNAs as "self" to avoid being recognized as "non-self" by MDA5, a host innate immune dsRNA sensor, leading us to pursue therapeutic applications in cancer, autoimmune diseases, and viral infection. The other major direction of the lab is to develop technologies to harness endogenous ADAR enzymes for site-specific transcriptome engineering.

  • Lingyin Li

    Lingyin Li

    Assistant Professor of Biochemistry

    BioDr. Li is an assistant professor in the Biochemistry Department and ChEM-H Institute at Stanford since 2015. Her lab works on understanding biochemical mechanisms of innate immunity and harnessing it to treat cancer. She majored in chemistry at University of Science and Technology of China and graduated with a B. En in 2003. She then trained with Dr. Laura Kiessling, a pioneer in chemical biology, at University of Wisconsin-Madison and graduated with a Ph.D in chemistry in 2010. She obtained her postdoctoral training with Dr. Timothy Mitchison at Harvard Medical School, who introduced her to the field of chemical immunology.

  • Kyle Loh

    Kyle Loh

    Assistant Professor of Developmental Biology (Stem Cell)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe have developed a strategy to generate fairly pure populations of various human tissue progenitors in a dish from embryonic stem cells (ESCs). We have delineated the sequential lineage steps through which ESCs diversify into various tissues, and in so doing, developed methods to exclusively induce certain fates at the expense of others. The resultant pure populations of tissue progenitors are the fundamental building blocks for regenerative medicine.

  • Jonathan Z. Long

    Jonathan Z. Long

    Assistant Professor of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur laboratory focuses on the endocrine hormones and other circulating hormone-like molecules that regulate mammalian energy metabolism. With modern mass spectrometry, it is now recognized that blood plasma likely contains many more bioactive factors than previously recognized, secreted by cell types that were not previously considered to have endocrine functions. What are the identities of these molecules? What energy stressors do they respond to? Where are they made? What cell types or tissues do they act on? We use chemical biology and mass spectrometry-based technologies as discovery tools. We combine these tools with classical biochemical and genetic approaches in cell and animal models. Our goal is to uncover new endocrine pathways of organismal energy metabolism. Recent studies from our laboratory have identified a family of cold-regulated circulating lipids that stimulate mitochondrial respiration as well as an exercise-stimulated thermogenic polypeptide hormone. We suspect that many more remain to be discovered. We anticipate that our approach will uncover fundamental mechanisms that control mammalian energy homeostasis. In the long term, we hope to translate our discoveries into therapeutic opportunities that matter for metabolic and other age-associated chronic diseases.

  • Sharon R. Long

    Sharon R. Long

    William C. Steere, Jr. - Pfizer Inc. Professor in Biological Sciences and Professor, by courtesy, of Biochemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsBiochemistry, genetics and cell biology of plant-bacterial symbiosis

  • Anson Lowe

    Anson Lowe

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Gastroenterology and Hepatology), Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe laboratory is focused on the relationship between injury, wound healing, and cancer. Esophageal, gastric, and pancreatic cancers are a focus. We are particularly interested in the regulation of cell signaling by EGFR, the EGF receptor. In addition to cancer pathogenesis, active projects include the development of new diagnostic assays and drugs.

  • Liqun Luo

    Liqun Luo

    Ann and Bill Swindells Professor in the School of Humanities and Sciences and Professor, by courtesy, of Neurobiology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe are studying how neural circuits are assembled during development, and how they contribute to sensory perception. We are addressing these questions at different levels from molecular, cellular, circuit to animal behavior. We are primarily using Drosophila as a model organism for our studies. Most recently, we are also developing novel genetic tools in the mouse to extend our studies to the mammalian brain.

  • Vinit Mahajan, MD, PhD

    Vinit Mahajan, MD, PhD

    Associate Professor of Ophthalmology at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur focus is the development of personalized medicine for eye diseases through translation of our discoveries in proteomics, genomics, and phenomics in humans, mice and tissue culture models.

  • Nicholas Melosh

    Nicholas Melosh

    Professor of Materials Science and Engineering
    On Leave from 10/01/2020 To 12/31/2020

    BioThe Melosh group explores how to apply new methods from the semiconductor and self-assembly fields to important problems in biology, materials, and energy. We think about how to rationally design engineered interfaces to enhance communication with biological cells and tissues, or to improve energy conversion and materials synthesis. In particular, we are interested in seamlessly integrating inorganic structures together with biology for improved cell transfection and therapies, and designing new materials, often using diamondoid molecules as building blocks.
    My group is very interested in how to design new inorganic structures that will seamless integrate with biological systems to address problems that are not feasible by other means. This involves both fundamental work such as to deeply understand how lipid membranes interact with inorganic surfaces, electrokinetic phenomena in biologically relevant solutions, and applying this knowledge into new device designs. Examples of this include “nanostraw” drug delivery platforms for direct delivery or extraction of material through the cell wall using a biomimetic gap-junction made using nanoscale semiconductor processing techniques. We also engineer materials and structures for neural interfaces and electronics pertinent to highly parallel data acquisition and recording. For instance, we have created inorganic electrodes that mimic the hydrophobic banding of natural transmembrane proteins, allowing them to ‘fuse’ into the cell wall, providing a tight electrical junction for solid-state patch clamping. In addition to significant efforts at engineering surfaces at the molecular level, we also work on ‘bridge’ projects that span between engineering and biological/clinical needs. My long history with nano- and microfabrication techniques and their interactions with biological constructs provide the skills necessary to fabricate and analyze new bio-electronic systems.


    Research Interests:
    Bio-inorganic Interface
    Molecular materials at interfaces
    Self-Assembly and Nucleation and Growth

  • Timothy Meyer

    Timothy Meyer

    Stanford University Professor of Nephrology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsInadequate removal of uremic solutes contributes to widespread illness in the more than 500,000 Americans maintained on dialysis. But we know remarkably little about these solutes. Dr. Meyer's research efforts are focused on identifying which uremic solutes are toxic, how these solutes are made, and how their production could be decreased or their removal could be increased. We should be able to improve treatment if we knew more about what we are trying to remove.

  • Daria Mochly-Rosen

    Daria Mochly-Rosen

    The George D. Smith Professor in Translational Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsTwo areas: 1. Using rationally-designed peptide inhibitors to study protein-protein interactions in cell signaling. Focus: protein kinase C in heart and large GTPases regulating mitochondrial dynamics in neurodegdenration. 2. Using small molecules (identified in a high throughput screens and synthetic chemistry) as activators and inhibitors of aldehyde dehydrogenases, a family of detoxifying enzymes, and glucose-6-phoshate dehydrogenase, in normal cells and in models of human diseases.

  • W. E. Moerner

    W. E. Moerner

    Harry S. Mosher Professor and Professor, by courtesy, of Applied Physics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsLaser spectroscopy and microscopy of single molecules to probe biological systems, one biomolecule at a time. Primary thrusts: fluorescence microscopy far beyond the optical diffraction limit (PALM/STORM/STED), methods for 3D optical microscopy in cells, and trapping of single biomolecules in solution for extended study. We explore protein localization patterns in bacteria, structures of amyloid aggregates in cells, signaling proteins in the primary cilium, and dynamics of DNA and RNA.

  • Denise M. Monack

    Denise M. Monack

    Professor of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe primary focus of my research is to understand the genetic and molecular mechanisms of intracellular bacterial pathogenesis. We use several model systems to study complex host-pathogen interactions in the gut and in immune cells such as macrophages and dendritic cells. Ultimately we would like to understand how Salmonella persists within certain hosts for years in the face of a robust immune response.

  • David Myung, MD, PhD

    David Myung, MD, PhD

    Assistant Professor of Ophthalmology at the Stanford University Medical Center and, by courtesy, of Chemical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsNovel biomaterials to reconstruct the wounded cornea
    Mesenchymal stem cell therapy for corneal and ocular surface regeneration
    Engineered biomolecule therapies for promote corneal wound healing

    Telemedicine in ophthalmology

  • William Nelson

    William Nelson

    Rudy J. and Daphne Donohue Munzer Professor in the School of Medicine, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur research objectives are to understand the cellular mechanisms involved in the development and maintenance of epithelial cell polarity. Polarized epithelial cells play fundamental roles in the ontogeny and function of a variety of tissues and organs.

  • Garry Nolan

    Garry Nolan

    Rachford and Carlota Harris Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Nolan's group uses high throughput single cell analysis technology cellular biochemistry to study autoimmunity, cancer, virology (influenza & Ebola), as well as understanding normal immune system function. Using advanced flow cytometric techniques such as Mass Cytometry, MIBI (ion beam imaging), CODEX and computational biology approaches, we focus on understanding disease processes at the single cell level. We have a strong interest in cancer immunotherapy and pathogen-host interactions.

  • Sergiu P. Pasca

    Sergiu P. Pasca

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsA critical challenge in understanding the intricate programs underlying development, assembly and dysfunction of the human brain is the lack of direct access to intact, functioning human brain tissue for detailed investigation by imaging, recording, and stimulation.
    Our lab is using pluripotent stem cells derived non-invasively from human individuals to generate in a dish specific regions of the human brain in a functional 3D preparation we have developed. We are using months-to-years long ‘brain-a-dish’ cultures (also known as brain region-specific organoids or spheroids) to understand how neurons find their final position in the brain and how they mature functionally. To investigate how different brain regions talk to each-other in normal and diseased states, we introduced a new approach for in vitro assembly of neural circuits, also known as assembloids.
    We employ state-of-the-art stem cell biology, genome engineering, imaging and neuroscience approaches to identify the dynamical processes that go awry in neural cells derived from patients with neuropsychiatric disorders, such as autism or schizophrenia, and what should be therapeutically targeted in these conditions.

  • Suzanne Pfeffer

    Suzanne Pfeffer

    Emma Pfeiffer Merner Professor in the Medical Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe major focuses of our research is to understand the molecular basis of inherited Parkinson's Disease (PD) and to elucidate the molecular mechanisms by which proteins and cholesterol are transported between specific membrane compartments. We focus on the LRRK2 kinase that is inappropriately activated in PD and how it phosphorylates Rab GTPases, blocking the formation of primary cilia in culture and specific regions of the brain.

  • Elizabeth Ponder

    Elizabeth Ponder

    Director of Planning and Operations, Stanford ChEM-H

    BioDr. Elizabeth Ponder joined Stanford ChEM-H in 2014 and is currently the Director of Planning and Operations. Dr. Ponder completed her Ph.D. and postdoctoral training at Stanford University in the laboratory of Dr. Matthew Bogyo. Her past work has included promoting public-private partnerships in the non-profit sector, managing multidisciplinary research in the higher education sector, and business development consulting in the for-profit biotech sector. Dr. Ponder joined ChEM-H from the University of California, Berkeley where she served as the Executive Director of the Henry Wheeler Center for Emerging & Neglected Diseases (CEND).

  • Matthew Porteus

    Matthew Porteus

    Professor of Pediatrics (Stem Cell Transplantation)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsGenome Editing and Population Dynamics for Gene Therapy and Cancer Research

  • Guillem Pratx

    Guillem Pratx

    Assistant Professor of Radiation Oncology (Radiation Physics)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe Physical Oncology Lab is interested in making a lasting impact on translational cancer research by building novel physical tools and methods.

  • Lei Stanley Qi

    Lei Stanley Qi

    Assistant Professor of Bioengineering and of Chemical and Systems Biology

    BioDr. Lei Stanley Qi is Assistant Professor in the Department of Bioengineering, Department of Chemical and Systems Biology, and a faculty fellow in Stanford ChEM-H. He is one of major contributors to the CRISPR technology development for genome engineering. He demonstrated the first use of the nuclease-deactivated Cas9 (dCas9) for genome targeting in cells. Using dCas9, His lab developed the CRISPR interference (CRISPRi) and CRISPR activation (CRISPRa) technologies for gene expression regulation, which is broadly used for high-throughput study of genomics in different organisms. He co-developed the CRISPR application for chromatin imaging in living cells. His lab greatly expanded the CRISPR toolbox for engineering the genome and epigenome, including multiplexed epigenome editing, programmable 3D genome manipulation (CRISPR-GO), live-cell imaging (LiveFISH), and CRISPR antivirals for targeting RNA viruses (PAC-MAN). He obtained B.S. in Physics from Tsinghua University, and Ph.D. in Bioengineering from the University of California Berkeley in 2012. He joined UCSF as Systems Biology Faculty Fellow between 2012 to 2014, and joined the faculty at Stanford University since 2014. His lab combines genome engineering with synthetic biology to understand the function of mammalian genomes and develop gene therapy.

  • Jianghong Rao

    Jianghong Rao

    Professor of Radiology (Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford) and, by courtesy, of Chemistry
    On Partial Leave from 09/01/2020 To 10/31/2020

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsProbe chemistry and nanotechnology for molecular imaging and diagnostics

  • Julien Sage

    Julien Sage

    Professor of Pediatrics (Hematology/Oncology) and of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe investigate the mechanisms by which normal cells become tumor cells, and we combine genetics, genomics, and proteomics approaches to investigate the differences between the proliferative response in response to injury and the hyperproliferative phenotype of cancer cells and to identify novel therapeutic targets in cancer cells.

  • Kathleen M. Sakamoto

    Kathleen M. Sakamoto

    Shelagh Galligan Professor in the School of Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research focuses on the molecular pathways that regulate normal and aberrant blood cell development, including acute leukemia and bone marrow failure syndromes. We are also studying novel drugs for treatment of cancer.

  • Julia Salzman

    Julia Salzman

    Assistant Professor of Biochemistry and of Biomedical Data Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCircular RNA regulation and function; computational and experimental approaches