Stanford ChEM-H


Showing 31-40 of 147 Results

  • Ron Dror

    Ron Dror

    Associate Professor of Computer Science and, by courtesy, of Molecular and Cellular Physiology and of Structural Biology

    BioRon Dror is an Associate Professor of Computer Science and, by courtesy, Molecular and Cellular Physiology and Structural Biology at Stanford University, where he is also affiliated with the Institute for Computational and Mathematical Engineering, the Stanford Artificial Intelligence Lab, Bio-X, ChEM-H, and the Biophysics and Biomedical Informatics Programs. Dr. Dror's research at Stanford addresses a broad set of computational biology problems related to the spatial organization and dynamics of biomolecules and cells.

    Before joining Stanford in March 2014, Dr. Dror served as second-in-command of D. E. Shaw Research, a hundred-person company, having joined in 2002 as its first hire. At DESRES, he focused on high-performance computing and biomolecular simulation—in particular, developing technology that accelerates molecular dynamics simulations by orders of magnitude, and applying these simulations to the study of protein function, protein folding, and protein-drug interactions (part of a project highlighted by Science as one of the top 10 scientific breakthroughs of 2010).

    Dr. Dror earned a PhD in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT, an MPhil in Biological Sciences as a Churchill Scholar at the University of Cambridge, and both a BA in Mathematics and a BS in Electrical and Computer Engineering at Rice University, summa cum laude. As a student, he worked in genomics, vision, image analysis, and neuroscience. He has been awarded a Fulbright Scholarship and fellowships from the National Science Foundation, the Department of Defense, and the Whitaker Foundation, as well as a Gordon Bell Prize and several Best Paper awards.

  • Justin Du Bois

    Justin Du Bois

    Henry Dreyfus Professor in Chemistry and Professor, by courtesy, of Chemical and Systems Biology

    BioResearch and Scholarship

    Research in the Du Bois laboratory spans reaction methods development, natural product synthesis, and chemical biology, and draws on expertise in molecular design, molecular recognition, and physical organic chemistry. An outstanding goal of our program has been to develop C–H bond functionalization processes as general methods for organic chemistry, and to demonstrate how such tools can impact the logic of chemical synthesis. A second area of interest focuses on the role of ion channels in electrical conduction and the specific involvement of channel subtypes in the sensation of pain. This work is enabled in part through the advent of small molecule modulators of channel function.

    The Du Bois group has described new tactics for the selective conversion of saturated C–H to C–N and C–O bonds. These methods have general utility in synthesis, making possible the single-step incorporation of nitrogen and oxygen functional groups and thus simplifying the process of assembling complex molecules. To date, lab members have employed these versatile oxidation technologies to prepare natural products that include manzacidin A and C, agelastatin, tetrodotoxin, and saxitoxin. Detailed mechanistic studies of metal-catalyzed C–H functionalization reactions are performed in parallel with process development and chemical synthesis. These efforts ultimately give way to advances in catalyst design. A long-standing goal of this program is to identify robust catalyst systems that afford absolute control of reaction selectivity.

    In a second program area, the Du Bois group is exploring voltage-gated ion channel structure and function using the tools of chemistry in combination with those of molecular biology, electrophysiology, microscopy and mass spectrometry. Much of this work has focused on studies of eukaryotic Na and Cl ion channels. The Du Bois lab is interested in understanding the biochemical mechanisms that underlie channel subtype regulation and how such processes may be altered following nerve injury. Small molecule toxins serve as lead compounds for the design of isoform-selective channel modulators, affinity reagents, and fluorescence imaging probes. Access to toxins and modified forms thereof (including saxitoxin, gonyautoxin, batrachotoxin, and veratridine) through de novo synthesis drives studies to elucidate toxin-receptor interactions and to develop new pharmacologic tools to study ion channel function in primary cells and murine pain models.

  • Alexander Dunn

    Alexander Dunn

    Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy lab is deeply interested in understand how living cells sense and respond to mechanical stimuli.

  • Alice C. Fan

    Alice C. Fan

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Oncology) and, by courtesy, of Urology at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Fan is a physician scientist who studies how turning off oncogenes (cancer genes) can cause tumor regression in preclinical and clinical translational studies. Based on her findings, she has initiated clinical trials studying how targeted therapies affect cancer signals in kidney cancer and low grade lymphoma. In the laboratory, she uses new nanotechnology strategies for tumor diagnosis and treatment to define biomarkers for personalized therapy.

  • Jessica Feldman

    Jessica Feldman

    Assistant Professor of Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe are interested in understanding design principles within cells that contribute to the diversification of cellular form and function. Using a combination of genetic, biochemical, and live imaging approaches, we are investigating how the microtubule cytoskeleton is spatially organized and the mechanisms underlying organizational changes during development.

  • Dean W. Felsher

    Dean W. Felsher

    Professor of Medicine (Oncology) and of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy laboratory investigates how oncogenes initiate and sustain tumorigenesis. I have developed model systems whereby I can conditionally activate oncogenes in normal human and mouse cells in tissue culture or in specific tissues of transgenic mice. In particular using the tetracycline regulatory system, I have generated a conditional model system for MYC-induced tumors. I have shown that cancers caused by the conditional over-expression of the MYC proto-oncogene regress with its inactivation.

  • Daniel Fernandez

    Daniel Fernandez

    ChEM-H MSKC Co-director, Stanford ChEM-H

    BioMy research interests have always been focused on understanding how molecules affecting our life work. Since enzymes, proteins, DNA, and RNA, and their low molecular weight ligands, co-factors, and metal ions are all extremely tiny entities invisible to the naked eye, I use crystallographic methods to bring them in sight. This can be achieved by using the brightest of light sources, the synchrotron light produced at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource at SLAC.

    At the ChEM-H Macromolecular Structure Knowledge Center (MSKC) my work focuses in structural biology. Obtaining good quality macromolecular three-dimensional structures is paramount for advancing knowledge. Tremendous advances in automation and newer generations of screenings dedicated for protein crystallography allow researchers to a successful structure determination. At MSKC you'll find those tools and, more importantly, a fertile ground to develop your ideas.

  • Michael Fischbach

    Michael Fischbach

    Associate Professor of Bioengineering and of Medicine (Microbiology and Immunology)

    BioMichael Fischbach is an Associate Professor in the Department of Bioengineering at Stanford University, an institute scholar of Stanford ChEM-H, and the director of the Stanford Microbiome Therapies Initiative. Fischbach is a recipient of the NIH Director's Pioneer and New Innovator Awards, an HHMI-Simons Faculty Scholars Award, a Fellowship for Science and Engineering from the David and Lucille Packard Foundation, a Medical Research Award from the W.M. Keck Foundation, a Burroughs Wellcome Fund Investigators in the Pathogenesis of Infectious Disease award, and a Glenn Award for Research in Biological Mechanisms of Aging. His laboratory uses a combination of genomics and chemistry to identify and characterize small molecules from microbes, with an emphasis on the human microbiome. Fischbach received his Ph.D. as a John and Fannie Hertz Foundation Fellow in chemistry from Harvard in 2007, where he studied the role of iron acquisition in bacterial pathogenesis and the biosynthesis of antibiotics. After two years as an independent fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital, Fischbach joined the faculty at UCSF, where he founded his lab before moving to Stanford in 2017. Fischbach is a co-founder and director of Federation Bio, a co-founder of Revolution Medicines, and a member of the scientific advisory board of NGM Biopharmaceuticals.

  • Polly Fordyce

    Polly Fordyce

    Assistant Professor of Bioengineering and of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe Fordyce Lab is focused on developing new instrumentation and assays for making quantitative, systems-scale biophysical measurements of molecular interactions. Current research in the lab is focused on three main platforms: (1) arrays of valved reaction chambers for high-throughput protein expression and characterization, (2) spectrally encoded beads for multiplexed bioassays, and (3) sortable droplets and microwells for single-cell assays.

  • Paige Fox

    Paige Fox

    Assistant Professor of Surgery (Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    BioDr. Paige Fox is Board Certified Plastic Surgeon who specialized in hand surgery, reconstructive microsurgery, as well as peripheral nerve and brachial plexus surgery. She is an Assistant Professor in the Division of Plastic and Reconstructive surgery in the Department of Surgery. She works with adult and pediatric patients. Her research focuses on wound healing, disorders of the upper extremity, and surgical biosensors.