Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research (SIEPR)


Showing 31-40 of 90 Results

  • Gopi Shah Goda

    Gopi Shah Goda

    Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research

    BioGopi Shah Goda is a senior fellow and deputy director at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research (SIEPR) at Stanford University. She completed her PhD in economics at Stanford University in 2007. She is also a Faculty Research Fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research and a Fellow of the Society of Actuaries. Prior to joining SIEPR, she was a Robert Wood Johnson Scholar in Health Policy Research at Harvard University. Gopi conducts research on issues primarily related to the economics of aging in the United States that inform economic policymaking. Her recent research studies include an examination of perceptual and behavioral biases and their relationship with retirement saving decisions and the effects of long-term care insurance on family members’ work and location decisions. Her work has appeared in a variety of leading economics journals, and has been supported by the Social Security Administration, the National Institutes on Aging, the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation and the TIAA Institute.

  • Judith L. Goldstein

    Judith L. Goldstein

    Janet M. Peck Professor of International Communication, Professor of Political Science and Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research

    BioJudith L. Goldstein is the Janet M. Peck Professor of International Communication and the Kaye University Fellow in Undergraduate Education. Her research focuses on international political economy, with a focus on trade politics. She has written and/or edited six book including Ideas, Interests and American Trade Policy and more recently The Evolution of the Trade Regime: Politics, Law and Economics of the GATT and the WTO. Her articles have appeared in numerous journals.

    Her current research focuses on the political requisites for trade liberalization focusing both on tariff bargaining and public preferences. As well, she is engaged in the analysis of a large survey panel, which focuses on how economic hard times influences public opinion.

    Goldstein has a BA from the University of California Berkeley, a Masters degree from Columbia University and a Ph.D. from UCLA.

  • Lawrence Goulder

    Lawrence Goulder

    Shuzo Nishihara Professor of Environmental and Resource Economics, Senior Fellow at SIEPR, at the Precourt Institute for Energy and at the Woods Institute for the Environment and Professor of Integrated Socio-Environmental Systems

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsGoulder's research examines the environmental and economic impacts of environmental policies in the U.S. and China, with a focus on policies to deal with climate change and air pollution. His current research focuses on the evaluation of proposed U.S. federal level climate change policies and China's emerging nationwide emissions trading program to reduce carbon dioxide emissions.

    His work also explores the sustainability of natural resources and well-being in several countries.

    Results from his work have been published in academic journal articles as well as in the book, Confronting the Climate Challenge: Options for US Policy, which was published by Columbia University Press in 2017.

    His work often employs a general equilibrium analytical framework that integrates the economy and the environment and links the activities of government, industry, and households. The research considers both the aggregate benefits and costs of various policies as well as the distribution of policy impacts across industries, income groups, and generations. Some of his work involves collaborations with climate scientists, biologists, and engineers.

    Goulder has conducted analyses for several government agencies, business groups, and environmental organizations, and has served on advisory committees to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the California Air Resources Board.

  • David Grusky

    David Grusky

    Edward Ames Edmonds Professor of Economics and Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research

    BioDavid B. Grusky is Barbara Kimball Browning Professor in the School of Humanities and Sciences, Director of the Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality, and coeditor of Pathways Magazine. His research addresses the changing structure of late-industrial inequality and addresses such topics as (a) the role of rent-seeking and market failure in explaining the takeoff in income inequality, (b) the amount of economic and social mobility in the U.S. and other high-inequality countries (with a particular focus on the “Great Gatsby” hypothesis that opportunities for social mobility are declining), (c) the role of essentialism in explaining the persistence of extreme gender inequality, (d) the forces behind recent changes in the amount of face-to-face and online cross-class contact, and (e) the putative decline of big social classes. He is also involved in projects to improve the country’s infrastructure for monitoring poverty, inequality, and mobility by exploiting administrative and other forms of “big data” more aggressively. His recent books include Social Stratification (2014), Occupy the Future (2013), The New Gilded Age (2012), The Great Recession (2011), The Inequality Reader (2011), and The Inequality Puzzle (2010).

  • Stephen Haber

    Stephen Haber

    A.A. and Jeanne Welch Milligan Professor, Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution and at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research, Professor of History and, by courtesy, of Economics

    BioStephen Haber is A.A. and Jeanne Welch Milligan Professor in the School of Humanities and Sciences and Peter and Helen Bing Senior Fellow of the Hoover Institution at Stanford University. He is also Professor of Political Science, Professor of History, and Professor of Economics (by courtesy), a Senior Fellow of the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research, and a Senior Fellow of the Stanford Center for International Development. Haber’s research spans a number of academic disciplines, including comparative politics, financial economics, and economic history. He has authored, coauthored, or edited ten books, and his papers have been published in journals such as American Political Science Review, World Politics, International Security, the Journal of Economic History, the Hispanic American Historical Review, the Journal of Banking and Finance, and the Journal of International Business Studies. Haber's most recent book, Fragile by Design: The Political Origins of Banking Crises and Scarce Credit (coauthored with Charles Calomiris) was published by Princeton University Press in 2014. His current research focuses on two areas: the impact of geography on the long-run evolution of economic and political institutions; and the political conditions under which societies sustain intellectual property systems that promote innovation.

  • Andrew Hall

    Andrew Hall

    Professor of Political Economics in the Graduate School of Business, of Political Science and, Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research and at the Hoover Institution

    BioAndrew Hall is a Professor of Political Science and, by courtesy, a Professor of Political Economy at the Graduate School of Business. He is the co-director of the Democracy & Polarization Lab and a Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research. Currently, Hall’s research group is focused on understanding how to preserve democracy and safely administer elections in the time of COVID-19, how to reduce or manage political polarization, and how state and local governments in the United States can become more dynamic and better able to grow, build, and innovate.

  • James Hamilton

    James Hamilton

    Hearst Professor and Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMedia economics, journalism, economics of regulation

  • Eric Hanushek

    Eric Hanushek

    Paul and Jean Hanna Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution, by courtesy at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research and Professor, by courtesy, of Education

    BioEric Hanushek is the Paul and Jean Hanna Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution of Stanford University. He has been a leader in the development of economic analysis of educational issues. His widely-cited research spans many policy-related education topics. His latest book, The Knowledge Capital of Nations: Education and the Economics of Growth, identifies the close link between the skills of the people and the economic growth of the nation. He has authored or edited 24 books along with over 250 articles. He is a Distinguished Graduate of the United States Air Force Academy and completed his Ph.D. in economics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. (http://hanushek.stanford.edu/)