Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research (SIEPR)


Showing 71-80 of 101 Results

  • Anne Margaret Joseph O'Connell

    Anne Margaret Joseph O'Connell

    Adelbert H. Sweet Professor of Law and Senior Fellow, by courtesy, at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research

    BioAnne Joseph O’Connell is a lawyer and social scientist whose research and teaching focuses on administrative law and the federal bureaucracy. Outside of Stanford, she is a contributor to the Center on Regulation and Markets at the Brookings Institution and an appointed senior fellow of the Administrative Conference of the United States, an independent federal agency dedicated to improving regulatory procedures. She is an elected fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the National Academy of Public Administration, and an elected member of the American Law Institute.

    O’Connell has written on a number of topics, including agency rulemaking, the selection of agency leaders, and bureaucratic organization (and reorganization). Her publications have appeared in leading law and political science journals. She has co-edited a book (with Daniel A. Farber), Research Handbook on Public Choice and Public Law, and she joined the Gellhorn and Byse’s Administrative Law casebook as a co-editor with the twelfth edition.

    O’Connell’s research has received a number of awards. She is a two-time recipient of the ABA’s Scholarship Award in Administrative Law for the best article or book published in the preceding year — for her 2014 article “Bureaucracy at the Boundary” and her 2009 article “Vacant Offices: Delays in Staffing Top Agency Positions.” She is also a two-time winner of the Richard D. Cudahy Writing Competition on Regulatory and Administrative Law from the American Constitution Society—for her article “Actings” (co-winner in 2020) and for her co-authored article (with Farber) “The Lost World of Administrative Law” (2014). Her article “Political Cycles of Rulemaking” was the top paper selected for the Association of American Law Schools’ 2007-2008 Scholarly Papers Competition for untenured faculty members. In addition, her research has been cited by Congress, the Supreme Court, the D.C. Circuit, and the Ninth Circuit, and has been featured in the Washington Post and other national media.

    At Stanford Law School, O’Connell teaches administrative law, advanced administrative law, and constitutional law. The class of 2020 chose her to receive the Hurlbut Award, which is given to one professor “who strives to make teaching an art.” She currently co-chairs the school’s efforts to improve teaching and classroom climate and serves on the steering committee for Stanford University’s Faculty Women’s Forum. Prior to joining Stanford University in 2018, O’Connell was the George Johnson Professor of Law at the University of California, Berkeley. While there, she received the Distinguished Teaching Award (the campus’s most prestigious honor for teaching) in 2016 and Berkeley Law’s Rutter Award for Teaching Distinction in 2012. From April 2013 to July 2015, she served as associate dean for faculty development and research, under three different deans. In 2013-2014, O’Connell was co-president of the Society for Empirical Legal Studies (co-organizing the 2014 Conference on Empirical Legal Studies).

    Before joining the Berkeley Law faculty in 2004, O’Connell clerked for Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg during the Supreme Court’s October 2003 term. From 2001 to 2003, she was a trial attorney for the Department of Justice’s Federal Programs Branch where she received special commendation for her work. She clerked for Judge Stephen F. Williams of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit from 2000 to 2001. A Truman Scholar, O’Connell worked for a number of federal agencies in earlier years, including the Department of Defense (General Counsel and Inspector General), Federal Trade Commission (Bureau of Competition), Department of Justice (Office of Legal Counsel), and U.S. Army (RDE). She is a member of the New York bar and served as a volunteer for the Biden-Harris Campaign’s policy team.

  • Lisa Ouellette

    Lisa Ouellette

    Deane F. Johnson Professor of Law and Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research

    BioLisa Larrimore Ouellette is the Deane F. Johnson Professor of Law at Stanford Law School, as well as a Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research. Her scholarship addresses empirical and theoretical problems in intellectual property and innovation law. She takes advantage of her training in physics to explore policy issues such as how scientists use the technical information in patents, how scientific expertise might improve patent examination, the patenting of publicly funded research under the Bayh–Dole Act, and the integration of IP with other levers of innovation policy. She has applied these ideas to biomedical innovation challenges including the opioid epidemic, the COVID-19 pandemic, and pharmaceutical prices. She has also written about multiple legal issues in trademark law, about the evidentiary value of online surveys, and about the potential for different standards of review to create what she terms “deference mistakes” in numerous areas of law.

    Professor Ouellette is also an acclaimed teacher and nationally recognized intellectual property law expert. She has coauthored a free patent law casebook, Patent Law: Cases, Problems, and Materials. She has written over 350 posts for her blog, Written Description, and her commentary has appeared in publications including the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, TIME Magazine, and Slate. She has been selected to design and lead pedagogy training for other Stanford Law faculty. In 2018, she received the law school’s John Bingham Hurlbut Award for Excellence in Teaching.

    Prior to her appointment at Stanford Law School in 2014, Professor Ouellette was a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Information Society Project at Yale Law School. She also clerked for Judge Timothy B. Dyk of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit and Judge John M. Walker, Jr. of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit. She holds a J.D. from Yale Law School, where she was an Articles Editor of the Yale Law Journal and a Coker Fellow in Contract Law. She earned a Ph.D. in physics from Cornell University as well as a B.A. in physics from Swarthmore College, and she has conducted scientific research at the Max Planck Institute, CERN, and NIST.

  • Luigi Pistaferri

    Luigi Pistaferri

    Ray Lyman Wilbur Professor and Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research

    BioLuigi Pistaferri is a Professor of Economics at Stanford University, a research fellow of NBER, CEPR and IZA, the "Ralph Landau" Senior Fellow at SIEPR, and one of the co-editors of the American Economic Review. His papers are on the intersection between labor economics and macroeconomics. Pistaferri holds a PhD in Economics from University College, London, and a Doctorate in Economic Sciences from IUN in Naples (Italy), where he was born in 1968. Pistaferri joined Stanford University in 1999 after finishing his PhD and has been a member of the faculty ever since, with the exception of one year sabbatical spent at EIEF in Rome.

  • sean reardon

    sean reardon

    Professor of Poverty and Inequality in Education, Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research and Professor, by courtesy, of Sociology
    On Leave from 01/01/2024 To 08/31/2024

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe causes and patterns of racial/ethnic and socioeconomic achievement disparities;

    The effects of school integration policies on segregation patterns and educational outcomes;

    Income inequality and its educational and social consequences.

    http://cepa.stanford.edu/sean-reardon