Stanford Neurosciences Institute


Showing 1-10 of 26 Results

  • Sanjiv Sam Gambhir, MD, PhD

    Sanjiv Sam Gambhir, MD, PhD

    Virginia and D.K. Ludwig Professor for Clinical Investigation in Cancer Research and Professor, by courtesy, of Materials Science and Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy laboratory focuses on merging advances in molecular biology with those in biomedical imaging to advance the field of molecular imaging. Imaging for the purpose of better understanding cancer biology and applications in gene and cell therapy, as well as immunotherapy are all being studied. A key long-term focus is the earlier detection of cancer by combining in vitro diagnostics and molecular imaging.

  • Chris Garcia

    Chris Garcia

    Younger Family Professor and Professor of Structural Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsStructural and functional studies of transmembrane receptor interactions with their ligands in systems relevant to human health and disease - primarily in immunity, infection, and neurobiology. We study these problems using protein engineering, structural, biochemical, and combinatorial biology approaches.

  • Justin Gardner

    Justin Gardner

    Assistant Professor of Psychology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsHow does neural activity in the human cortex create our sense of visual perception? We use a combination of functional magnetic resonance imaging, computational modeling and analysis, and psychophysical measurements to link human perception to cortical brain activity.

  • Joseph Garner

    Joseph Garner

    Associate Professor of Comparative Medicine and, by courtesy, of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe medical research community has long recognized that “good well-being is good science”. The lab uses an integrated interdisciplinary approach to explore this interface, while providing tangible deliverables for the well-being of human patients and research animals.

  • Andrew Gentles

    Andrew Gentles

    Assistant Professor (Research) of Medicine (Biomedical Informatics) and, by courtesy, of Biomedical Data Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsComputational systems biology of human disease. Particular focus on integration of high-throughput datasets with each other, and with phenotypic information and clinical outcomes.

  • Paul George, MD, PhD

    Paul George, MD, PhD

    Assistant Professor of Neurology and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    BioStroke is the leading cause of disability in the United States, drastically disrupting the lives of stroke survivors and their caretakers. Unfortunately, because of tight therapeutic time requirements, the majority of stroke patients are not eligible for the current medicines or interventions. The George Lab's research focuses on improving stroke diagnostics as well as engineering new methods to enhance stroke recovery. Our lab's primary focus is applying novel bioengineering techniques to understand the mechanisms of neural recovery (primarily in stroke) and discovering methods to improve patient recovery. We use rodent models of stroke combined with biomaterial techniques, stem cell transplants, and microfabrication to achieve these aims and evaluate our methods with behavior testing and various imaging techniques. Our ultimate goal is to translate these findings into clinical trials to help stroke patients.

  • Rona Giffard

    Rona Giffard

    Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsAstrocytes, microglia and neurons interact, and have unique vulnerabilities to injury based on their patterns of gene expression and their functional roles. We focus on the cellular and molecular basis of brain cell injury in stroke. We study the effects of altering miRNA expression, altering levels of heat shock and cell death regulatory proteins. Our goal is to improve outcome by improving mitochondrial function and brain cell survival, and reducing oxidative stress and inflammation.

  • William Gilly

    William Gilly

    Professor of Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy work has contributed to understanding electrical excitability in nerve & muscle in organisms ranging from brittle-stars to mammals. Current research addresses behavior, physiology and ecology of squid through field and lab approaches. Electronic tagging plus in situ video, acoustic and oceanographic methods are used to study behaviors and life history in the field. Lab work focuses on control of chromogenic behavior by the chromatophore network and of locomotion by the giant axon system.

  • Lisa Giocomo

    Lisa Giocomo

    Assistant Professor of Neurobiology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy laboratory studies the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the organization of cortical circuits important for spatial navigation and memory. We are particularly focused on medial entorhinal cortex, where many neurons fire in spatially specific patterns and thus offer a measurable output for molecular manipulations. We combine electrophysiology, genetic approaches and behavioral paradigms to unravel the mechanisms and behavioral relevance of non-sensory cortical organization. Our first line of research is focused on determining the cellular and molecular components crucial to the neural representation of external space by functionally defined cell types in entorhinal cortex (grid, border and head direction cells). We plan to use specific targeting of ion channels, combined with in vivo tetrode recordings, to determine how channel dynamics influence the neural representation of space in the behaving animal. A second, parallel line of research, utilizes a combination of in vivo and in vitro methods to further parse out ionic expression patterns in entorhinal cortices and determine how gradients in ion channels develop. Ultimately, our work aims to understand the ontogenesis and relevance of medial entorhinal cortical topography in spatial memory and navigation.