Stanford Neurosciences Institute


Showing 1-100 of 341 Results

  • Lawrence Steinman, MD

    Lawrence Steinman, MD

    George A. Zimmermann Professor and Professor of Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur laboratory is dedicated to understanding the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases, particularly multiple sclerosis. We have developed several new therapies for autoimmunity, including some in Phase 2 clinical trials, as well as one approved drug, natalizumab. We have developed microarray technology for detecting autoantibodies to myelin proteins and lipids. We employ a diverse range of molecular and celluar approaches to trying to understand multiple sclerosis.

  • David Spiegel, M.D.

    David Spiegel, M.D.

    Jack, Samuel and Lulu Willson Professor in Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Spiegel's research program involves mind/body interactions, including cancer progression, the response to traumatic stress, and the effect of hypnosis on the perception of pain and anxiety.

  • Merritt Maduke

    Merritt Maduke

    Associate Professor of Molecular and Cellular Physiology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMolecular mechanisms of chloride channels & transporters studied by integration of structural and electrophysiological methods.

  • Miriam B. Goodman

    Miriam B. Goodman

    Professor of Molecular and Cellular Physiology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe study the molecular events that give rise to the sensation of touch and temperature in C. elegans. To do this, we use a combination of quantitative behavioral analysis, genetics, in vivo electrophysiology, and heterologous expression of ion channels. We also collaborate with Pruitt's group in Mechanical Engineering to develop and fabricate novel devices for the study of sensory transduction.

  • Richard J. Reimer, MD

    Richard J. Reimer, MD

    Associate Professor of Neurology and, by courtesy, of Molecular and Cellular Physiology at the Palo Alto Veterans Administration Health Care System

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsReimer Lab interests

    A primary interest of our lab is to understand how nerve cells make and recycle neurotransmitters, the small molecules that they use to communicate with each other. In better defining these processes we hope to achieve our long-term goal of identifying novel sites for treatment of diseases such as epilepsy and Parkinson Disease. In our studies on neurotransmitter metabolism we have focused our efforts on transporters, a functional class of proteins that move neurotransmitters and other small molecules across membranes in cells. Transporters have many characteristics that make them excellent pharmacological targets, and not surprisingly some of the most effective treatments for neuropsychiatric disorders are directed at transporters. We are specifically focusing on two groups of transporters – vesicular neurotransmitter transporters that package neurotransmitters into vesicles for release, and glutamine transporters that shuttle glutamine, a precursor for two major neurotransmitters glutamate and GABA, to neurons from glia, the supporting cells that surround them. We are pursuing these goals through molecular and biochemical studies, and, in collaboration with the Huguenard and Prince labs, through physiological and biosensor based imaging studies to better understand how pharmacological targeting of these molecules will influence neurological disorders.

    A second interest of our lab is to define mechanism underlying the pathology of lysosomal storage disorders. Lysosomes are membrane bound acidic intracellular organelles filled with hydrolytic enzymes that normally function as recycling centers within cells by breaking down damaged cellular macromolecules. Several degenerative diseases designated as lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs) are associated with the accumulation of material within lysosomes. Tay-Sachs disease, Neimann-Pick disease and Gaucher disease are some of the more common LSDs. For reasons that remain incompletely understood, these diseases often affect the nervous system out of proportion to other organs. As a model for LSDs we are studying the lysosomal free sialic acid storage disorders. These diseases are the result of a defect in transport of sialic acid across lysosomal membranes and are associated with mutations in the gene encoding the sialic acid transporter sialin. We are using molecular, genetic and biochemical approaches to better define the normal function of sialin and to determine how loss of sialin function leads to neurodevelopmental defects and neurodegeneration associated with the lysosomal free sialic acid storage disorders.

  • David C. Yeomans

    David C. Yeomans

    Associate Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPhysiology of different pain types; Biomarkers of pain and inflammation; Gene Therapy for Pain

  • Debra Safer MD

    Debra Safer MD

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (General Psychiatry and Psychology-Adult)) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPrimary research interests include the nature and treatment of eating disorders
    (particularly bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder), the development and treatment of obesity, and the development and treatment of problematic eating patterns in patients following bariatric surgery.

  • Thomas Clandinin

    Thomas Clandinin

    Shooter Family Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe Clandinin lab focuses on understanding how neuronal circuits assemble and function to perform specific computations and guide behavior. Taking advantage of a rich armamentarium of genetic tools available in the fruit fly, combined with imaging, physiology and analytical techniques drawn from systems neuroscience, we examine a variety of visual circuits.

  • Sandip Biswal, MD

    Sandip Biswal, MD

    Associate Professor of Radiology (General Radiology) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe management of individuals suffering from chronic pain is unfortunately limited by poor diagnostic tests and therapies. Our research group is interested in 'imaging pain' by using novel imaging techniques to study peripheral nociception and inflammation with the goal of accurately identifying the location of pain generators. We are developing new approaches with positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) (PET/MRI) and are currently in clinical trials.

  • Robert West

    Robert West

    Professor of Pathology at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy laboratory studies the molecular events that lead to and sustain cancers, including breast cancer and other epithelial cancers, using high through put sequencing and other techniques.

  • Tony Wyss-Coray, PhD

    Tony Wyss-Coray, PhD

    Professor of Neurology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsUse of genetic and molecular tools to dissect immune and inflammatory pathways in Alzheimer's and neurodegeneration.

  • Ting-Ting Huang

    Ting-Ting Huang

    Associate Professor (Research) of Neurology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe study the role of oxygen free radicals in oxidative tissue damage and degeneration. Our research tools include transgenic and knockout mice and tissue culture cells for in vitro gene expression.

  • Natalie L. Rasgon

    Natalie L. Rasgon

    Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (General Psychiatry and Psychology-Adult) and, by courtesy, of Obstetrics and Gynecology (Maternal Fetal Medicine) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Rasgon has been involved in longitudinal placebo-controlled neuroendocrine studies for nearly two decades, and she has been involved in neuroendocrine and brain imaging studies of estrogen effects on depressed menopausal women for the last eight years. It should be noted that in addition to her duties as a Professor of Psychiatry and Obstetrics & Gynecology, Dr. Rasgon is also the Director of the Behavioral Neuroendocrinology Program and of the Women's Wellness Program.

  • James K. Chen

    James K. Chen

    Professor of Chemical and Systems Biology and of Developmental Biology and, by courtesy, of Chemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur laboratory combines synthetic chemistry and developmental biology to investigate the molecular events that regulate embryonic patterning, tissue regeneration, and tumorigenesis. We are currently using genetic and small-molecule approaches to study the molecular mechanisms of Hedgehog signaling, and we are developing chemical technologies to perturb and observe the genetic programs that underlie vertebrate development.

  • Tirin Moore

    Tirin Moore

    Professor of Neurobiology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe study neural mechanisms of visual-motor integration and the neural basis of cognition (e.g. attention). We study the activity of single neurons in visual and motor structures within the brain, examine how perturbing that activity affects neurons in other brain structures, and also how it affects the perceptual and

  • Robert K. Jackler, MD

    Robert K. Jackler, MD

    Edward C. and Amy H. Sewall Professor in Otorhinolaryngology and Professor, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery and of Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsTobacco advertising - please see below for details

    Clinical: Development of innovative surgical methods, via the cranial base, to expose inaccessible intracranial disease. Surgical simulation and robotics. Evidence based outcomes analysis in acoustic neuroma and other tumors of the cerebellopontine angle.

    Medical history - especially the history of otology, neurosurgery, deafness, and quackery.

  • Sanjiv Sam Gambhir, MD, PhD

    Sanjiv Sam Gambhir, MD, PhD

    Virginia and D.K. Ludwig Professor for Clinical Investigation in Cancer Research and Professor, by courtesy, of Bioengineering and of Materials Science and Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy laboratory focuses on merging advances in molecular biology with those in biomedical imaging to advance the field of molecular imaging. Imaging for the purpose of better understanding cancer biology and applications in gene and cell therapy, as well as immunotherapy are all being studied. A key long-term focus is the earlier detection of cancer by combining in vitro diagnostics and molecular imaging.

  • Bingwei Lu

    Bingwei Lu

    Professor of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe are interested in understanding how neural stem cells balance their self-renewal and differentiation and how deregulation of this process can result in brain tumor. We are also interested in mechanisms of neurodegeneration in Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. We are using both Drosophila and mammalian models to address these fundamental questions.

  • Lawrence Recht, MD

    Lawrence Recht, MD

    Professor of Neurology and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur laboratory focuses on two interrelated projects: (1) assessment of glioma development within the framework of the multistage model of carcinogenesis through utilization of the rodent model of ENU neurocarcinogenesis; and (2) assessment of stem cell specification and pluripotency using an embryonic stem cell model system in which neural differentiation is induced.

  • Eric Shooter

    Eric Shooter

    Professor of Neurobiology, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe biochemistry and molecular genetics of growth and differentiation of nerve cells. The structure, biosynthesis and mechanism of action of nerve growth factor and other neurotrophins. Gene regulation in target organs and glial cells during nerve regeneration. The role of apolipoproteins and of the myelin protein PMP-22 during nerve degeneration and regeneration and in peripheral neuropathies.

  • Tobias Meyer

    Tobias Meyer

    Mrs. George A. Winzer Professor in Cell Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCELLULAR INFORMATION PROCESSING The main problem in signal transduction is to understand how different receptor-stimuli specifically control diverse cell functions. We are using automated microscopy, live-cell fluorescent biosensors and perturbations of predicted signaling proteins to systematically dissect signaling networks. This allows us to identify signaling modules and to elucidate and ultimately model the flow of cellular information.

  • M Bruce MacIver

    M Bruce MacIver

    Professor (Research) of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe study drug effects on the nervous system. Cellular, synaptic and molecular drug actions are investigated using electrophysiological and pharmacological tools in cortical/hippocampal brain slice preparations. We are also interested in mechanisms of neuronal integration and synchronization, especially related to patterns of EEG activity seen in vivo and in brain slices.

  • William Talbot

    William Talbot

    Senior Associate Dean, Graduate Education & Postdoctoral Affairs and Professor of Developmental Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe use genetic and cellular approaches to investigate the molecular basis of glial development and myelination in the zebrafish.

  • Gregory W. Albers, MD

    Gregory W. Albers, MD

    The Coyote Foundation Professor and Professor, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur group’'s research focus is the acute treatment and prevention of cerebrovascular disorders. Our primary interest is the use of advanced imaging techniques to expand the treatment window for ischemic stroke. We are also conducting clinical studies of both neuroprotective and thrombolytic strategies for the treatment of acute stroke and investigating new antithrombotic strategies for stroke prevention.

  • Joachim Hallmayer

    Joachim Hallmayer

    Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPrincipal Investigator
    Infrastructure to facilitate discovery of autism genes
    The purpose of this project is to facilitate the discovery of the genes that contribute autism by maintaining an infrastructure which research groups studying the genetics of autism can work collaboratively. This will be
    accomplished through workshops, a Virtual Private Network, and access to a database that includes phenotype and genotype data from all participating groups.

    Principal Investigator
    A California Population-Based Twin Study of Autism
    This will address several fundamental questions: (1) What is the heritability of autism (2) What is the contribution of genetic factors to variation in symptom dimensions? (3) Is there a continuum between the quantitative neurocognitive traits and clinical disorder? (4) What proportion of the variance in the neurocognitive traits is accounted for by genetic and non-genetic factors?

    Co-Investigator
    Center for Integrating Ethics in Genetics Research(Cho)
    The goal of this project is to serve as a center of excellence in neurogenetics research, to develop a national model for bench, to bedside research ethics consultation, and to provide training opportunity in biomedical ethics.

    Co-Investigator
    Gene, Brain and Behavior in Turner Syndrome(Reiss)
    The primary objective of this project is to use advanced, multi-modal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques, analyses of X chromosome parent-of-origin and cognitive-behavioral assessment to elucidate the effects of monosomy and X-linked imprinting on neurodevelopment and neural function in a large cohort of young girls with Turner syndrome, pre-estrogen replacement.

    Project Director
    Project F: Genomic Analysis in narcolepsy cataplexy
    The goal of the project is to locate genes outside the HLA region that influence susceptibility to narcolepsy. In order to localize these genes we will carry out a linkage and association study in the most extensive world-wide collection of DNAs from well-characterized patients with narcolepsy and their families.

  • Thomas Rando, MD, PhD

    Thomas Rando, MD, PhD

    Professor of Neurology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur laboratory studies the molecular mechanisms regulating stem cell function, the effects of aging on skeletal muscle and skeletal muscle stem cells, and the pathogenesis and experimental therapeutics for hereditary muscle diseases, specifically the muscular dystrophies.

  • Jaime Lopez, MD

    Jaime Lopez, MD

    Associate Professor of Neurology and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy clinical interests are in the areas of Intraoperative Neurophysiologic Monitoring (IOM), clinical neurophysiology, electromyopgraphy and in the use of botulinum toxins in the treatment of neurologic disorders. Our IOM group’s research is in the development of new and innovative techniques for monitoring the nervous system during surgical and endovascular procedures and how these alter surgical management and patient outcomes. I am also active in formulating national IOM practice guidelines.

  • Uel Jackson McMahan

    Uel Jackson McMahan

    Professor of Neurobiology and of Structural Biology, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe are currently investigating mechanisms involved in synaptic transmission and synaptogenesis using electron microscope tomography in ways that provide in situ 3D structural information at macromolecular resolution.

  • Mark Krasnow

    Mark Krasnow

    Professor of Biochemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests- Lung development and stem cells
    - Neural circuit of breathing
    - Lung diseases including lung cancer
    - New genetic model organisms for medicine

  • John Huguenard

    John Huguenard

    Professor of Neurology, of Neurosurgery and, by courtesy, of Molecular and Cellular Physiology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe are interested in the neuronal mechanisms that underlie synchronous oscillatory activity in the thalamus, cortex and the massively interconnected thalamocortical system. Such oscillations are related to cognitive processes, normal sleep activities and certain forms of epilepsy. Our approach is an analysis of the discrete components (cells, synapses, microcircuits) that make up thalamic and cortical circuits, and reconstitution of components into in silico computational networks.

  • William Newsome

    William Newsome

    Harman Family Provostial Professor, Vincent V. C. Woo Director of the Stanford Neurosciences Institute, and Professor of Neurobiology and, by courtesy, of Psychology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsNeural processes that mediate visual perception and visually-based decision making. Influence of reward history on decision making.

  • Les Dorfman, MD

    Les Dorfman, MD

    Professor of Neurology and Neurological Sciences, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsClinical electrophysiology of the peripheral and central nervous systems, including nerve conduction velocity; electromyography (EMG); and visual, auditory and somatosensory evoked potentials. Multiple sclerosis (MS) diagnosis and treatment. Neurological education.

  • Edith Vioni Sullivan

    Edith Vioni Sullivan

    Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Major Laboratories and Clinical Translational Neurosciences Incubator)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsApplication of neuroimaging modalities and component process analysis of cognitive, sensory, and motor functions to identify brain structural and functional mechanisms disrupted in diseases affecting the brain: alcoholism, HIV infection, and normal aging from adolescence to senescence.

  • Matthew P. Scott

    Matthew P. Scott

    Professor of Developmental Biology, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur research has been focused on the genetic regulation of animal development and its relation to birth defects, cancer, and neurodegeneration. We studied mechanisms and functions of Hedgehog (Hh) signaling, which controls cell fates and growth, in the context of normal development and brain cancer. We studied a neurodegenerative disease, Niemann-Pick C syndrome, that affects intracellular organelle movements and sterol homeostasis. Due to Dr. Scott's new job, the lab is no longer active.

  • Richard Lewis

    Richard Lewis

    Professor of Molecular and Cellular Physiology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe study molecular mechanisms of calcium signaling with a focus on store-operated CRAC channels and their essential roles in T cell development and function. Currently we aim to define the molecular mechanism for CRAC channel activation and the means by which calcium signal dynamics mediate specific activation of transcription factors and T-cell genes during development.

  • Gary Glover

    Gary Glover

    Professor of Radiology (General Radiology) and, by courtesy, of Psychology and of Electrical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe work in the Radiological Sciences Laboratory is devoted to the advancement of imaging sciences for applications in diagnostic radiology. We collaborate closely with departmental clinicians and with others in the school of medicine, humanities, and the engineering sciences. The laboratory's activities include development of both CT and MR imaging techniques, with spiral CT.

  • Ann M. Arvin

    Ann M. Arvin

    Vice Provost and Dean of Research, Lucile Salter Packard Professor of Pediatrics and Professor of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur laboratory investigates the pathogenesis of varicella zoster virus (VZV) infection, focusing on the functional roles of particular viral gene products in pathogenesis and virus-cell interactions in differentiated human cells in humans and in Scid-hu mouse models of VZV cell tropisms in vivo, and the immunobiology of VZV infections.

  • Richard Tsien

    Richard Tsien

    George D. Smith Professor, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe study synaptic communication between brain cells with the goal of understanding neuronal computations and memory mechanisms. Main areas of focus include: presynaptic calcium channels, mechanisms of vesicular fusion and recycling. Modulation of synaptic strength through changes in postsynaptic receptors and dendritic morphology. Signaling that links synaptic activity to nuclear transcription and local protein translation. Techniques include imaging, electrophysiology, molecular biology.

  • Alan F. Schatzberg

    Alan F. Schatzberg

    Kenneth T. Norris, Jr. Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsBiological bases of depressive disorders;, glucocorticoid/dopamine interactions in delusional depression;, pharmacologic treatment of depressive disorders.

  • Ben Barres

    Ben Barres

    Professor of Neurobiology, of Developmental Biology, of Neurology and, by courtesy, of Ophthalmology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur lab is interested in the neuronal-glial interactions that underlie the development and function of the mammlian central nervous system.

  • Michael Moseley

    Michael Moseley

    Professor of Radiology (General Radiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMR physics into tissue contrast mechanisms such as diffusion, perfusion, and functional imaging describes the research direction. Applications of cerebral stroke (brain attacks) and neurocognitive disorders are also being developed from these methods

  • James Lock

    James Lock

    Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and, by courtesy, of Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsJames Lock, MD, Ph.D. is Professor of Child Psychiatry and Pediatrics in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University School of Medicine where he has taught since 1993. He is board certified in adult as well as child and adolescent psychiatry. He directs the eating disorder program in Child Psychiatry and is active in treatment research for children and adolescents with eating disorders.

  • Daria Mochly-Rosen

    Daria Mochly-Rosen

    The George D. Smith Professor in Translational Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsTwo areas: 1. Using rationally-designed peptide inhibitors to study protein-protein interactions in cell signaling. Focus: protein kinase C in heart and large GTPases regulating mitochondrial dynamics in neurodegdenration. 2. Using small molecules (identified in a high throughput screens and synthetic chemistry) as activators and inhibitors of aldehyde dehydrogenases, a family of detoxifying enzymes, and glucose-6-phoshate dehydrogenase, in normal cells and in models of human diseases.

  • Raymond A. Sobel, M.D.

    Raymond A. Sobel, M.D.

    Professor of Pathology and, by courtesy, of Neurology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe study cellular and molecular mechanisms of immune-mediated injury in CNS tissues that are affected in multiple sclerosis (MS). We study: 1) tissues of mice with EAE using histology and immunohistochemistry, 2) cross-recognition of neurons by antibodies against myelin proteolipid protein epitopes, and a distinct oligodendrogliopathy induced in mice by the non-protein amino acid azetidine (Aze), (which is found in the human diet); Aze-induced abnormalities mimic those in MS patient CNS tissues

  • Mark M. Davis

    Mark M. Davis

    The Burt and Marion Avery Family Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMolecular mechanisms of lymphocyte recognition and differentiation; Systems immunology and human immunology; vaccination and infection.

  • Brian Kobilka

    Brian Kobilka

    Helene Irwin Fagan Chair in Cardiology and Professor, by courtesy, of Chemical and Systems Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsStructure, function and physiology of adrenergic receptors.

  • Stephen J Smith

    Stephen J Smith

    Professor of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch in the Smith Laboratory addresses basic mechanisms and and disorders of brain function. Present efforts are focused on the development and application of new proteomic imaging methods to explore the circuit and molecular architectures of memory storage and retrieval in cerebral cortex.

  • Lorrin Koran

    Lorrin Koran

    Professor (Clinical) of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interestsobsessive-compulsive disorder, depressive disorders, psychopharmacology, cost-effectiveness studies, trichotillomania, compulsive buying, pathological gambling,kleptomania.

  • Daniel V. Madison

    Daniel V. Madison

    Associate Professor of Molecular and Cellular Physiology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur laboratory is interested in the function and plasticity CNS synapses, including studies of the detailed structure and protein content of synapses in different plastic states. We also have a strong interest in the pathophysiology of Azheimer’s disease as related to endocannabinoids. We use primarily electrophysiogy and high-resolution array tomographic imaging to dissect the function of synapses undergoing changes due either to external stimuli, disease states or internal modulation.

  • Eric I. Knudsen

    Eric I. Knudsen

    Edward C. and Amy H. Sewall Professor in the School of Medicine, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCellular mechanisms of spatial attention and learning, studied in the central nervous system in birds, using behavioral, systems, cellular and molecular techniques.

  • Shaul Hestrin

    Shaul Hestrin

    Professor of Comparative Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe main interest of my lab is to understand how the properties of neocortical neurons, the circuits they form and the inputs they receive give rise to neuronal activity and behavior. Our approach includes behavioral studies, two-photon calcium imaging, in vivo whole cell recording in behaving animals and optogenetic methods to activate or to silence the activity of cortical neurons.

  • Axel Brunger

    Axel Brunger

    Professor of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, of Neurology, of Photon Science and, by courtesy, of Structural Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOne of Axel Brunger's major goals is to decipher the molecular mechanisms of synaptic neurotransmitter release by conducting imaging and single-molecule/particle reconstitution experiments, combined with near-atomic resolution structural studies of the synaptic vesicle fusion machinery.

  • Yanmin Yang

    Yanmin Yang

    Associate Professor of Neurology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsElucidate biological functions of cytoskeletal associated proteins in neurons. Define the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration in null mice.

  • Rachel Manber, PhD

    Rachel Manber, PhD

    Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (General Psychiatry and Psychology-Adult) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests1) Insomnia during pregnancy
    2) Acupuncture for chronic low back pain

  • Jennifer L. Raymond

    Jennifer L. Raymond

    Professor of Neurobiology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe study the neural mechanisms of learning, using a combination of behavioral, neurophysiological, and computational approaches. The model system we use is a form of cerebellum-dependent learning that regulates eye movements.

  • Chris Garcia

    Chris Garcia

    Younger Family Professor and Professor of Structural Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsStructural and functional studies of transmembrane receptor interactions with their ligands in systems relevant to human health and disease - primarily in immunity, infection, and neurobiology. We study these problems using protein engineering, structural, biochemical, and combinatorial biology approaches.

  • Helen Bronte-Stewart, MD, MS

    Helen Bronte-Stewart, MD, MS

    John E. Cahill Family Professor, Professor of Neurology and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research focus is human motor control and brain pathophysiology in movement disorders. Our overall goal is to understand the role of the basal ganglia electrical activity in the pathogenesis of movement disorders. We have developed novel computerized technology to measure fine, limb and postural movement. With these we are measuring local field potentials in basal ganglia nuclei in patients with Parkinson's disease and dystonian and correlating brain signalling with motor behavior.

  • Keith Humphreys

    Keith Humphreys

    Esther Ting Memorial Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Humphreys researches interventions for substance abuse and psychiatric disorders. He focuses particularly on evaluating the outcomes of professionally-administered treatments and peer-operated self-help groups (e.g., Alcoholics Anonymous), developing health services research-related applications for innovative qualitative and quantitative research techniques, and analyzing national mental health policy.

  • David Clark

    David Clark

    Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine at the Palo Alto Veterans Affairs Health Care System

    BioAfter completion of training I came to Stanford University in 1998. Since that time I have been involved in a number of clinical and research activities. I oversee the Pain Service at the Palo Alto VA hospital where I am involved in the care of patients with both acute and chronic pain. I am active both in the clinic and on a number of committees dedicated to improving pain management for veterans. Much of my remaining time is spent supervising a research laboratory. There we are pursuing several projects related to the questions of why pain sometimes becomes chronic after injuries and why opioids lose their effectiveness over time when used to treat chronic pain. We would like to find ways to maximize functional recovery after surgery and other forms of trauma while minimizing the risks of analgesic use. This work involves local, national and international collaborations.

  • Mark A. Kay, M.D., Ph.D.

    Mark A. Kay, M.D., Ph.D.

    Dennis Farrey Family Professor in Pediatrics, and Professor of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMark A. Kay, M.D., Ph.D. Director of the Program in Human Gene Therapy and Professor in the Departments of Pediatrics and Genetics. Respected worldwide for his work in gene therapy for hemophilia, Dr. Kay and his laboratory focus on establishing the scientific principles and developing the technologies needed for achieving persistent and therapeutic levels of gene expression in vivo. The major disease models are hemophilia, hepatitis C, and hepatitis B viral infections.

  • Paul Buckmaster, DVM, PhD

    Paul Buckmaster, DVM, PhD

    Professor of Comparative Medicine and of Neurology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMechanisms of epilepsy, especially temporal lobe epilepsy.

  • Allan L. Reiss

    Allan L. Reiss

    Howard C. Robbins Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and Professor of Radiology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy laboratory, the Center for Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences Research (CIBSR), focuses on multi-level scientific study of individuals with typical and atypical brain structure and function. Data are obtained from genetic analyses, structural and functional neuroimaging studies, assessment of endocrinological status, neurobehavioral assessment, and analysis of pertinent environmental factors. Our overarching focus is to model how brain disorders arise and to develop disease-specific treatments.

  • Pak H. Chan

    Pak H. Chan

    The James R. Doty Professor in Neurosurgery and Neurosciences, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsNeuronal death and regeneration after strokeand neural injury

  • C. Garrison Fathman

    C. Garrison Fathman

    Professor of Medicine (Immunology and Rheumatology), Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy lab of molecular and cellular immunology is interested in research in the general field of T cell activation and autoimmunity. We have identified and characterized a gene (GRAIL) that seems to control regulatory T cell (Treg) responsiveness by inhibiting the Treg IL-2 receptor desensitization. We have characterized a gene (Deaf1) that plays a major role in peripheral tolerance in T1D. Using PBC gene expression, we have provisionally identified a signature of risk and progression in T1D.

  • Stanley N. Cohen, MD

    Stanley N. Cohen, MD

    Kwoh-Ting Li Professor in the School of Medicine and Professor of Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe study mechanisms that affect the expression and decay of normal and abnormal mRNAs, and also RNA-related mechanisms that regulate microbial antibiotic resistance. A small bioinformatics team within our lab has developed knowledge based systems to aid in investigations of genes.

  • Edgar Engleman

    Edgar Engleman

    Professor of Pathology and of Medicine (Immunology and Rheumatology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDendritic cells, macrophages, NK cells and T cells; functional proteins and genes; immunotherapeutic approaches to cancer, autoimmune disease, neurodegenerative disease and metabolic disease.

  • Eugene Butcher

    Eugene Butcher

    Klaus Bensch Professor in Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur interests include:
    1) The physiology and significance of lymphocyte homing in local and systemic immunity;
    2) biochemical and genetic studies of molecules that direct leukocyte recruitment;
    3) cellular and molecular genetic studies of leukocyte chemotaxis and the role of chemokines;
    4) vascular differentiation in normal and pathologic inflammatory states;
    5) systems and chemical biology approaches to understanding the regulation of lymphocyte trafficking programs.

  • Helen M. Blau

    Helen M. Blau

    The Donald E. and Delia B. Baxter Foundation Professor and Director, Baxter Laboratory for Stem Cell Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsProf. Helen Blau's research area is regenerative medicine with a focus on stem cells. Her research on nuclear reprogramming and demonstrating the plasticity of cell fate using cell fusion is well known and her laboratory has also pioneered the design of biomaterials to mimic the in vivo microenvironment and direct stem cell fate. Current findings are leading to more efficient iPS generation, cell based therapies by dedifferentiation a la newts, and discovery of novel molecules and therapies.

  • David Prince

    David Prince

    Edward F. and Irene Thiele Pimley Professor in Neurology and the Neurological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsExperiments examine
    1)intrinsic properties of neuronal membranes; actions of neurotransmitters that regulate neocortical and thalamic excitability
    2) chronic epileptogenesis following cortical injury; changes in intracortical connectivity and receptors;
    3) effects of early injury and activity on cortical development/maldevelopment Electrophysiological, anatomical and pharmacological techniques employed.
    4. prophylaxis of postraumatic epilepsy
    5. Neocortical interneuronal function/modulation

  • Kim Butts Pauly

    Kim Butts Pauly

    Professor of Radiology (General Radiology) and, by courtesy, of Bioengineering and of Electrical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe are investigating and developing, and applying focused ultrasound in neuromodulation, blood brain barrier opening, and ablation for both neuro and body applications.

  • Vinod Menon

    Vinod Menon

    Rachel L. and Walter F. Nichols, MD, Professor and Professor, by courtesy, of Neurology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsEXPERIMENTAL, CLINICAL AND THEORETICAL SYSTEMS NEUROSCIENCE

    Cognitive neuroscience; Systems neuroscience; Cognitive development; Psychiatric neuroscience; Functional brain imaging; Dynamical basis of brain function; Nonlinear dynamics of neural systems.

  • Daniel Palanker

    Daniel Palanker

    Director of HEPL, Professor of Ophthalmology and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsInteractions of electric field and light with biological cells and tissues and their applications to imaging, diagnostics, therapeutics and prosthetics, primarily in ophthalmology.
    Specific fields of interest:
    Electronic retinal prosthesis;
    Electronic enhancement of tear secretion;
    Electronic control of blood vessels;
    Non-damaging retinal laser therapy;
    Ultrafast laser surgery;
    Interferometric imaging of neural signals;
    Cell transplantation and retinal plasticity.

  • Victor G. Carrion

    Victor G. Carrion

    John A. Turner Endowed Professor for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsExamines the interplay between brain development and stress vulnerability via a multi-method approach that includes psychophysiology, neuroimaging, neuroendocrinology and phenomenology. Treatment development that focuses on individual and community-based interventions for stress related conditions in children and adolescents that experience traumatic stress.

  • Sean Mackey, MD, PhD

    Sean Mackey, MD, PhD

    Redlich Professor and Professor, by courtesy, of Neurology at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsFunctional neuroimaging of pain. Imaging of cognitive and affective dimensions of pain, neural plasticity contributing to chronic pain and effects of treatment.

    Effects of membrane stabilizing medications on neuropathic pain.

    Chronic pain outcomes tools development and measurement.

  • James Trudell

    James Trudell

    Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMolecular theories of anesthesia. My emphasis is on the molecular interactions of inhalational anesthetics and alcohol. I perform computational chemistry simulations on how these molecules bind to putative receptor sites. I am also interested in modeling receptor proteins in which chimeras cause loss or enhancement of anesthetic sensitivity.

  • Robert Fisher, MD, PhD

    Robert Fisher, MD, PhD

    The Maslah Saul Professor in the Department of Neurology and Professor, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Fisher is interested in clincal, laboratory and translational aspects of epilepsy research. Prior work has included: electrical deep brain stimulation for epilepsy, studied in laboratory models and clinical trials; drug delivery to a seizure focus; mechanisms of absence epilepsy studied with in vitro slices of brain thalamus; hyperthermic seizures; diagnosis and treatment of non-epileptic seizures, the post-ictal state; driving and epilepsy; new antiepileptic drugs; surgery for epilepsy.

  • Gary K. Steinberg, MD, PhD

    Gary K. Steinberg, MD, PhD

    Bernard and Ronni Lacroute-William Randolph Hearst Professor in Neurosurgery and Neurosciences and Professor, by courtesy, of Neurology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur laboratory investigates the pathophysiology and treatment of cerebral ischemia, and methods to restore neurologic function after stroke. Treatment strategies include brain hypothermia, stem cell transplantation and optogenetic stimulation. Our clinical research develops innovative surgical, endovascular and radiosurgical approaches for treating difficult intracranial aneurysms, complex vascular malformations and occlusive disease, including Moyamoya disease, as well as stem cell transplant.

  • Marcia L. Stefanick, Ph.D.

    Marcia L. Stefanick, Ph.D.

    Professor (Research) of Medicine (Stanford Prevention Research Center), of Obstetrics and Gynecology and, by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMarcia Stefanick, Ph.D a Professor of Medicine at the Stanford Prevention Research Center, (SPRC) and Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Stanford University School of Medicine.
    Dr. Stefanicks research focuses on chronic disease prevention (particularly, heart disease, breast cancer, osteoporosis, and dementia) in both women and men. Her work on the effects of menopausal hormones on cardiovascular and other health outcomes in mostly healthy postmenopausal women (in the Womens Health Initiative, WHI), in women with established heart disease, (the Heart and Estrogen-progesterone Replacement Study, HERS), and in peri-menopausal and early post-menopausal women (the Postmenopausal Estrogen and Progesterone Interventions, PEPI) trials has been widely disseminated both nationally and internationally. She was also the principal investigator of two large diet trials focusing on the role of a low-fat eating pattern (including increased vegetables & fruits) on preventing breast cancer (WHI) and recurrence (Womens Healthy Eating and Living, WHEL, trial) and she conducted several medium-sized diet, exercise, and weight control trials focused on heart disease risk and body composition that have influenced national guidelines. [She is currently writing a proposal for a large national trial of physical activity in older women with cardiovascular outcomes, not just risk factors.] Her current passion is the study of Sex (and Gender) Differences in Human Physiology and Disease, the title of a course she teaches in Stanfords Human Biology program, in addition to a course entitled: Current Topics and Controversies in Womens Health. Dr. Stefanick also plays major leadership roles in Stanfords Cardiovascular Institutes Womens Heart Health Program and Stanford Cancer Institutes Cancer Prevention and Control Program.
    Dr. Stefanick obtained her B.A. in biology from the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (1974), then pursued her interest in hormone and sex difference research at the Oregon Regional Primate Research Center, after which she obtained her PhD in Physiology at Stanford University, focusing on reproductive physiology and neuroendocrinology with exercise physiology as a secondary focus. Her commitment to human research directed her to a post-doctoral fellowship in Cardiovascular Disease Prevention at SPRC, which has been her academic home for nearly 30 years.

  • Rona Giffard

    Rona Giffard

    Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsAstrocytes, microglia and neurons interact, and have unique vulnerabilities to injury based on their patterns of gene expression and their functional roles. We focus on the cellular and molecular basis of brain cell injury in stroke. We study the effects of altering miRNA expression, altering levels of heat shock and cell death regulatory proteins. Our goal is to improve outcome by improving mitochondrial function and brain cell survival, and reducing oxidative stress and inflammation.

  • Robert Malenka

    Robert Malenka

    Nancy Friend Pritzker Professor in Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsLong-lasting changes in synaptic strength are important for the modification of neural circuits by experience. A major goal of my laboratory is to elucidate the molecular events that trigger various forms of synaptic plasticity and the modifications in synaptic proteins that are responsible for the changes in synaptic efficacy.

  • Paul Graham Fisher, MD

    Paul Graham Fisher, MD

    Bing Director of the Program in Human Biology, Beirne Family Professor of Pediatric Neuro-Oncology, Professor of Pediatrics and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery at SUMC

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsClinical neuro-oncology: My research explores the epidemiology, natural history, and disease patterns of brain tumors in childhood, as well as prospective clinical trials for treating these neoplasms. Research interests also include neurologic effects of cancer and its therapies, and childhood headaches.

  • Jessica Rose

    Jessica Rose

    Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital and the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Rose's research investigates early brain and motor development in preterm children and neuromuscular mechanisms underlying cerebral palsy (CP). Research examines neonatal microstructural brain development on DTI and physiological correlates of motor function in preterm children. Dr. Rose serves on the NIH Taskforce on Childhood Motor Disorders, the AACPDM Research Committee and Steering Committee to develop CDE for CP neuroimaging diagnostics, and serves on the Board of Directors of SBMT.

  • Anthony Oro,  MD PhD

    Anthony Oro, MD PhD

    Eugene and Gloria Bauer Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur lab uses the skin to answer questions about epithelial stem cell biology, differentiation and carcinogenesis using genomics, genetics, and cell biological techniques. We have studied how hedgehog signaling regulates regeneration and skin cancer, and how tumors evolve to develop resistance. We study the mechanisms of early human skin development using human embryonic stem cells. These fundamentals studies provide a greater understanding of epithelial biology and novel disease therapeutics.

  • Douglas Vollrath

    Douglas Vollrath

    Associate Professor of Genetics and, by courtesy, of Ophthalmology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe Vollrath lab works to uncover molecular mechanisms relevant to the health and pathology of the outer retina. We study the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), a cell monolayer adjacent to photoreceptors that performs a variety of tasks crucial for retinal homeostasis. Specific areas of interest include the circadian regulation of RPE phagocytosis of photoreceptor outer segment tips, and how RPE metabolic dysfunction contributes to retinal degenerative diseases.

  • Garry Gold

    Garry Gold

    Professor of Radiology (General Radiology) and, by courtesy, of Bioengineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy primary focus is application of new MR imaging technology to musculoskeletal problems. Current projects include: Rapid MRI for Osteoarthritis, Weight-bearing cartilage imaging with MRI, and MRI-based models of muscle. We are studing the application of new MR imaging techniques such as rapid imaging, real-time imaging, and short echo time imaging to learn more about biomechanics and pathology of bones and joints.

  • Daniel Spielman

    Daniel Spielman

    Professor of Radiology (General Radiology) and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research interests are in the field of medical imaging, particularly magnetic resonance imaging and in vivo spectroscopy. Current projects include MRI and MRS at high magnetic fields and metabolic imaging using hyperpolarized 13C-labeled MRS.

  • Seung K. Kim  M.D., Ph.D.

    Seung K. Kim M.D., Ph.D.

    Professor of Developmental Biology and, by courtesy, of Medicine (Endocrinology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe study the genetics of pancreatic islet cell differentiation using molecular, embryologic and genetic methods in several model systems, including mice, embryonic stem cells, and Drosophila. Our work suggests that critical factors required for islet development are also needed to maintain essential functions of the mature islet. Our knowledge of genetic and cellular pathways governing islet formation has allowed us to use stem cell lines to produce islet replacements in vitro.

  • Steven D. Chang, MD

    Steven D. Chang, MD

    Robert C. and Jeannette Powell Neurosciences Professor and, by courtesy, of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsClinical research includes studies in the treatment of cerebrovascular disorders, such as aneurysms and AVMs, as well as the use of radiosurgery to treat tumors and vascular malformations of the brain and spine.

    Dr. Chang is C0-Director of the Cyberknife Radiosurgery Program.

    Dr. Chang is also the head of the The Stanford Neuromolecular Innovation Program with the goal of developing new technologies to improve the diagnosis and treatment of patients affected by neurological conditions.

  • Michael Greicius, MD, MPH

    Michael Greicius, MD, MPH

    Associate Professor of Neurology and, by courtesy, of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Greicius' research involves the use of functional MRI in conjunction with other imaging modalities to detect and characterize neural networks in healthy adults and patients with neuropsychiatric disorders. The main research objective is to develop novel imaging biomarkers that will enhance the understanding, diagnosis, and treatment of disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, major depression, and schizophrenia.

  • Gregory Kovacs

    Gregory Kovacs

    Professor of Electrical Engineering, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsHis present research areas include instruments for biomedical and biological applications including space flight, solid-state sensors and actuators, cell-based sensors for toxin detection and pharmaceutical screening, microfluidics, electronic interfaces to tissue, and biotechnology, all with emphasis on solving practical problems.

  • Calvin Kuo

    Calvin Kuo

    Maureen Lyles D'Ambrogio Professor and Professor, by courtesy, of Chemical and Systems Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe study cancer biology, intestinal stem cells (ISC), and angiogenesis. We use primary organoid cultures of diverse tissues for oncogene functional screening and therapeutics discovery. Angiogenesis projects include endothelial miRNA and GPCR ko mice, blood-brain barrier regulation, stroke therapeutics and anti-angiogenic cancer therapy. ISC projects apply organoid culture and ko mice to injury-inducible vs homeostatic stem cells and symmetric division mechanisms.

  • Susan K. McConnell

    Susan K. McConnell

    Susan B. Ford Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe McConnell Lab studies the cellular and molecular mechanisms that underlie the development of the mammalian cerebral cortex. Our work focuses on the earliest events that pattern the developing forebrain, enable neural progenitors to divide asymmetrically to generate young neurons, propel the migration of postmitotic neurons outward into their final positions, and sculpt the fates and phenotypes of the neurons as they differentiate.

  • Theo Palmer

    Theo Palmer

    Associate Professor of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMembers of the Palmer Lab study the biology of neural stem cells in brain development and in the adult. Our primary goal is to understand how genes and environment synergize in influencing stem cell behavior during development and how mild genetic or environmental risk factors for disease may synergize in their detrimental effects on brain development or in the risk of neuronal loss in age-related degenerative disease.

  • Maarten G. Lansberg, MD, PhD

    Maarten G. Lansberg, MD, PhD

    Associate Professor of Neurology at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research involves the design and conduct of clinical trials to discover new treatments for patients who have suffered a stroke. These trials span treatment of acute stroke, stroke recovery, and stroke prevention. My research in acute stroke is primarily focused on the use of advanced neuroimaging methods (CT and MRI) to select patients who are most likely to benefit from therapies aimed at restoring blood flow to the brain in patients who have suffered a stroke.

  • Elizabeth Mellins

    Elizabeth Mellins

    Professor of Pediatrics (Human Gene Therapy) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMolecular mechanisms and intracellular pathways of antigen processing and presentation; structure/function of HLA-DR,-DM, -DO; mechanisms underlying HLA allele association with disease; disease mechanisms in systemic idiopathic juveile arthritis, recently found to be an HLA-linked disease.

  • Aaron Straight

    Aaron Straight

    Associate Professor of Biochemistry and, by courtesy, of Chemical and Systems Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe study the biology of chromosomes. Our research is focused on understanding how chromosomal domains are specialized for unique functions in chromosome segregation, cell division and cell differentiation. We are particularly interested in the genetic and epigenetic processes that govern vertebrate centromere function, in the organization of the genome in the eukaryotic nucleus and in the roles of RNAs in the regulation of chromosome structure.

  • Anne Brunet

    Anne Brunet

    Michele and Timothy Barakett Endowed Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur lab studies the molecular basis of longevity. We are interested in the mechanism of action of known longevity genes, including FOXO and SIRT, in the mammalian nervous system. We are particularly interested in the role of these longevity genes in neural stem cells. We are also discovering novel genes and processes involved in aging using two short-lived model systems, the invertebrate C. elegans and an extremely short-lived vertebrate, the African killifish N. furzeri.