Stanford Neurosciences Institute


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  • Xiaolin Zheng

    Xiaolin Zheng

    Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering

    BioProfessor Zheng received her Ph.D. in Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering from Princeton University (2006), B.S. in Thermal Engineering from Tsinghua University (2000). Prior to joining Stanford in 2007, Professor Zheng did her postdoctoral work in the Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology at Harvard University. Professor Zheng is a member of MRS, ACS and combustion institute. Professor Zheng received the TR35 Award from the MIT Technology Review (2013), one of the 100 Leading Global Thinkers by the Foreign Policy Magazine (2013), 3M Nontenured Faculty Grant Award (2013), the Presidential Early Career Award (PECASE) from the white house (2009), Young Investigator Awards from the ONR (2008), DARPA (2008), Terman Fellowship from Stanford (2007), and Bernard Lewis Fellowship from the Combustion Institute (2004).

  • Roseanna N. Zia

    Roseanna N. Zia

    Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering and, by courtesy, of Mechanical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe Zia Group seeks answers to 3 Grand Challenge questions utilizing theory and computational analysis of complex fluids:
    1. Understand the mechanical nature of the origin of life.
    2. Elucidate the mechanics of the (colloidal) glass transition and kinetic arrest.
    3. Develop generalized non-equilibrium fluctuation-dissipation theory for soft matter.
    Though seemingly disparate avenues of inquiry, they are deeply and surprisingly connected by fluid and suspension mechanics.

  • Brad Zuchero, Ph.D.

    Brad Zuchero, Ph.D.

    Assistant Professor of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsGlia are a frontier of neuroscience, and overwhelming evidence from the last decade shows that they are essential regulators of all aspects of the nervous system. The Zuchero Lab aims to uncover how glial cells regulate neural development and how their dysfunction contributes to diseases like multiple sclerosis (MS) and in injuries like stroke.

    Although glia represent more than half of the cells in the human brain, fundamental questions remain to be answered. How do glia develop their highly specialized morphologies and interact with neurons to powerfully control form and function of the nervous system? How is this disrupted in neurodegenerative diseases and after injury? By bringing cutting-edge cell biology techniques to the study of glia, we aim to uncover how glia help sculpt and regulate the nervous system and test their potential as novel, untapped therapeutic targets for disease and injury.

    We are particularly interested in myelin, the insulating sheath around neuronal axons that is lost in diseases like MS. How do oligodendrocytes- the glial cell that produces myelin in the central nervous system- form and remodel myelin, and why do they fail to regenerate myelin in disease? Our current projects aim to use cell biology and neuroscience approaches to answer these fundamental questions. Ultimately we hope our work will lead to much-needed therapies to promote remyelination in patients.