Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment


Showing 1-6 of 6 Results

  • Stephen Palumbi

    Stephen Palumbi

    Jane and Marshall Steel Jr. Professor in Marine Sciences and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe're interested in ecological, evolutionary, and conservation questions related to marine (and sometimes terrestrial) organisms and ecosystems. We use evolutionary genetics and molecular ecology techniques, and our fieldwork takes us all around the world. Currently, we're studying coral diversity, the adaptive potential of corals in response to climate change, the movement of organisms between marine reserves, genetic changes in abalone in response to environmental.

  • Dmitri Petrov

    Dmitri Petrov

    Kevin and Michelle Douglas Professor in the School of Humanities and Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsEvolution of genomes and population genomics of adaptation and variation

  • Jonathan Payne

    Jonathan Payne

    Professor of Geological Sciences and, by courtesy, of Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy goal in research is to understand the interaction between environmental change and biological evolution using fossils and the sedimentary rock record. How does environmental change influence evolutionary and ecological processes? And conversely, how do evolutionary and ecological changes affect the physical environment? I work primarily on the marine fossil record over the past 550 million years.

  • Friedrich Prinz

    Friedrich Prinz

    Finmeccanica Professor and Senior Fellow at the Precourt Institute for Energy

    BioFritz Prinz is the Finmeccanica Professor in the School of Engineering at Stanford University, Professor of Materials Science and Engineering, Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Senior Fellow at the Precourt Institute for Energy. He also serves as the Director of the Nanoscale Prototyping Laboratory at Stanford. A solid-state physicist by training, Prinz leads a group of doctoral students who are addressing fundamental issues on energy conversion and storage at the nanoscale. In his Laboratory, prototype fuel cells, solar cells and batteries are used to test new concepts and novel material structures using atomic layer deposition, scanning tunneling microscopy and other technologies. Prinz is also interested in learning from nature, particularly understanding the electron transport chain in plant cells. The Prinz group, in collaboration with biologist Arthur Grossman, were the first to extract electrons directly from plant cells subjected to light stimulus. Before coming to Stanford in 1994, he was on the faculty at Carnegie Mellon University. Prinz earned a PhD in physics at the University of Vienna in Austria.

  • Manu Prakash

    Manu Prakash

    Assistant Professor of Bioengineering

    BioWe are a curiosity driven research group working in the field of physical biology. Our approach brings together experimental and theoretical techniques from soft-condensed matter physics, fluid dynamics, theory of computation and unconventional micro and nano-fabrication to open problems in biology: from organismal to cellular and molecular scale. We design and build precision instrumentation including droplet microfluidic tools to probe and perturb biological machines and their synthetic analogues. Along the way, we invent novel technologies in global health context with clinical applications in extreme resource poor settings.