Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment


Showing 1-100 of 177 Results

  • Newsha Ajami

    Newsha Ajami

    Sr Research Engineer, Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment

    Current Role at StanfordDirector of Urban Water Policy

  • Nicole M. Ardoin

    Nicole M. Ardoin

    Associate Professor of Education and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCommunity Involvement
    Community/Youth Development and Organizations
    Diversity
    Environmental Education
    Ethnography
    Evaluation
    Organizations
    Qualitative Research Methods

  • Kevin Arrigo

    Kevin Arrigo

    Donald and Donald M. Steel Professor in Earth Sciences and Director, Earth Systems Program

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsInvestigates role of ocean biology in gobal carbon and nutrient cycles.

  • Khalid Aziz

    Khalid Aziz

    Otto N. Miller Professor in the School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOptimization and reservoir Simulation.

  • Zhenan Bao

    Zhenan Bao

    K. K. Lee Professor in the School of Engineering, Senior Fellow at the Precourt Institute for Energy and Professor, by courtesy, of Materials Science and Engineering and of Chemistry

    BioZhenan Bao joined Stanford University in 2004. She is currently a K.K. Lee Professor in Chemical Engineering, and with courtesy appointments in Chemistry and Material Science and Engineering. She is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and National Academy of Inventors. She founded the Stanford Wearable Electronics Initiative (eWEAR) and is the current faculty director. She is also an affiliated faculty member of Precourt Institute, Woods Institute, ChEM-H and Bio-X. Professor Bao received her Ph.D. degree in Chemistry from The University of Chicago in 1995 and joined the Materials Research Department of Bell Labs, Lucent Technologies. She became a Distinguished Member of Technical Staff in 2001. Professor Bao currently has more than 400 refereed publications and more than 60 US patents. She served as a member of Executive Board of Directors for the Materials Research Society and Executive Committee Member for the Polymer Materials Science and Engineering division of the American Chemical Society. She was an Associate Editor for the Royal Society of Chemistry journal Chemical Science, Polymer Reviews and Synthetic Metals. She serves on the international advisory board for Advanced Materials, Advanced Energy Materials, ACS Nano, Accounts of Chemical Reviews, Advanced Functional Materials, Chemistry of Materials, Chemical Communications, Journal of American Chemical Society, Nature Asian Materials, Materials Horizon and Materials Today. She is one of the Founders and currently sits on the Board of Directors of C3 Nano Co. and PyrAmes, both are silicon valley venture funded companies. She is Fellow of AAAS, ACS, MRS, SPIE, ACS POLY and ACS PMSE. She was a recipient of the L'Oreal UNESCO Women in Science Award in 2017. She was awarded the ACS Applied Polymer Science Award in 2017, ACS Creative Polymer Chemistry Award in 2013 ACS Cope Scholar Award in 2011, and was selected by Phoenix TV, China as 2010 Most influential Chinese in the World-Science and Technology Category. She is a recipient of the Royal Society of Chemistry Beilby Medal and Prize in 2009, IUPAC Creativity in Applied Polymer Science Prize in 2008, American Chemical Society Team Innovation Award 2001, R&D 100 Award, and R&D Magazine Editors Choice Best of the Best new technology for 2001. She has been selected in 2002 by the American Chemical Society Women Chemists Committee as one of the twelve Outstanding Young Woman Scientist who is expected to make a substantial impact in chemistry during this century. She is also selected by MIT Technology Review magazine in 2003 as one of the top 100 young innovators for this century. She has been selected as one of the recipients of Stanford Terman Fellow and has been appointed as the Robert Noyce Faculty Scholar, Finmeccanica Faculty Scholar and David Filo and Jerry Yang Faculty Scholar.

  • Michele Barry, MD, FACP

    Michele Barry, MD, FACP

    Senior Associate Dean, Global Health, Director, Center for Innovation in Global Health, Professor of Medicine (Primary Care & Population Health), Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment and at the Freeman Spogli Institute

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsAreas of research
    Ethical Aspects of research conducted overseas
    Clinical Tropical Diseases
    Globalization's Impact upon Health Disparities
    Hemorrhagic Viruses

  • Eran Bendavid

    Eran Bendavid

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Primary Care and Population Health) and, by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsEffect of global health policies on health of individuals in developing countries, global health, HIV and TB.

  • Sally Benson

    Sally Benson

    Director, Precourt Institute for Energy and Professor of Energy Resources Engineering and Senior Fellow at the Precourt Institute for Energy

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research is focused on reducing the risks of climate change by developing energy supplies with low carbon emissions. Students and post-doctoral fellows in my research group work on carbon dioxide storage, energy systems analysis, and pathways for transitioning to a low-carbon energy system.

  • Stacey Bent

    Stacey Bent

    Jagdeep and Roshni Singh Professor in the School of Engineering, Senior Associate Dean for Faculty & Academic Affairs, Senior Fellow at Precourt and Professor, by courtesy, of Materials Science & Eng, of Electrical Eng and of Chemistry

    BioThe research in the Bent laboratory is focused on understanding and controlling surface and interfacial chemistry and applying this knowledge to a range of problems in semiconductor processing, micro- and nano-electronics, nanotechnology, and sustainable and renewable energy. Much of the research aims to develop a molecular-level understanding in these systems, and hence the group uses of a variety of molecular probes. Systems currently under study in the group include functionalization of semiconductor surfaces, mechanisms and control of atomic layer deposition, molecular layer deposition, nanoscale materials for light absorption, interface engineering in photovoltaics, catalyst and electrocatalyst deposition.

  • Sarah Billington

    Sarah Billington

    Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    BioOur group conducts research on sustainable, durable construction materials, their application to structures and construction, and their impact on wellbeing when incorporated into building design. In the area of materials we explore damage-tolerant, high-performance fiber-reinforced cementitious composite materials, bio-based fiber-reinforced polymeric composites that have a closed loop life-cycle, and innovative cement- and bio-based materials for thermal and sound insulation. In the area of building design we study the long-term impact of architectural design, materials, and artifacts in buildings on human well-being (including stress, physical activity, creativity, sense of belonging and environmental behavior). Additional research includes performance-based durability engineering with emphasis on evaluating the impact of corrosion in structural concrete bridges and of scour of bridge substructures.

  • Christine H. Black

    Christine H. Black

    Communications Director, Woods Institute

    Current Role at StanfordCommunications Director, Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment

  • Brian Blackburn, MD

    Brian Blackburn, MD

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Infectious Diseases

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy interests include parasitology and global health; I've investigated cryptosporidium and angiostrongylus outbreaks; schistosoma/strongyloides seroprevalence in refugees, and the distribution and impact of ITNs for malaria and filariasis prevention in Nigeria and India. I have done clinical and programmatic work at teaching hospitals in Liberia and Bangladesh and have opportunities for research in Bangladesh and Kenya, in collaboration with ICDDR,B and CDC, Kenya

  • Alexandria Boehm

    Alexandria Boehm

    Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    BioMy primary research area is coastal water quality, and recently I have expanded my research to include activities on sanitation more broadly. The work on coastal water quality is focused on understanding the sources, transformation, transport, and ecology of biocolloids - specifically fecal indicator organisms, pathogens, and phytoplankton, as well as sources and fate of nitrogen and phosphorus. This knowledge is crucial to directing new policies, and management and engineering practices that protect human and ecosystem health along the coastal margin. The work on sanitation aims to develop microbial risk assessment models to gain a better understanding of how pathogens are transmitted to humans through their contact with water, feces, and contaminated surfaces. Research is focused on key problems in developed and developing countries. The goal is to design and test effective interventions and technologies for reducing the burden of infectious disease.

  • Donna M. Bouley

    Donna M. Bouley

    Professor of Comparative Medicine at the Stanford University Medical Center, Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch interests: ocular pathology, host-pathogen interactions in infectious disease, infectious disease in frogs, phenotypic characterization of tg and ko mice, histopathology of minimally-invasive radiological ablation techniques (focused ultrasound, cryoablation).

  • Gordon Brown

    Gordon Brown

    Dorrell William Kirby Professor of Geology in the School of Earth Sciences, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsSurface and interface geochemistry; environmental fate of heavy metals; nanotechnology, applications of synchrotron radiation in geochemistry and mineralogy

  • Marshall Burke

    Marshall Burke

    Assistant Professor of Earth System Science, Center Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies and, by courtesy, at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    BioMarshall Burke is assistant professor in the Department of Earth System Science, and Center Fellow at the Center on Food Security and the Environment at Stanford University. His research focuses on social and economic impacts of environmental change, and on the economics of rural development in Africa. His work has appeared in both economics and scientific journals, including recent publications in Nature, Science, the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, and the Review of Economics and Statistics. He holds a PhD in Agricultural and Resource Economics from UC Berkeley, and a BA in International Relations from Stanford.

    Prospective students should see my personal webpage, linked at right.

  • Bruce Cain

    Bruce Cain

    Charles Louis Ducommun Professor in Humanities and Sciences and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment, at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research and at the Precourt Institute for Energy

    BioBruce E. Cain is a Professor of Political Science at Stanford University and Director of the Bill Lane Center for the American West. He received a BA from Bowdoin College (1970), a B Phil. from Oxford University (1972) as a Rhodes Scholar, and a Ph D from Harvard University (1976). He taught at Caltech (1976-89) and UC Berkeley (1989-2012) before coming to Stanford. Professor Cain was Director of the Institute of Governmental Studies at UC Berkeley from 1990-2007 and Executive Director of the UC Washington Center from 2005-2012. He was elected the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2000 and has won awards for his research (Richard F. Fenno Prize, 1988), teaching (Caltech 1988 and UC Berkeley 2003) and public service (Zale Award for Outstanding Achievement in Policy Research and Public Service, 2000). His areas of expertise include political regulation, applied democratic theory, representation and state politics. Some of Professor Cain’s most recent publications include “Malleable Constitutions: Reflections on State Constitutional Design,” coauthored with Roger Noll in University of Texas Law Review, volume 2, 2009; “More or Less: Searching for Regulatory Balance,” in Race, Reform and the Political Process, edited by Heather Gerken, Guy Charles and Michael Kang, CUP, 2011; “Redistricting Commissions: A Better Political Buffer?” in The Yale Law Journal, volume 121, 2012; and Democracy More or Less (CUP, 2015). He is currently working on problems of environmental governance.

  • Brian Cantwell

    Brian Cantwell

    Edward C. Wells Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor of Mechanical Engineering

    BioProfessor Cantwell's research interests are in the area of turbulent flow. Recent work has centered in three areas: the direct numerical simulation of turbulent shear flows, theoretical studies of the fine-scale structure of turbulence, and experimental measurements of turbulent structure in flames. Experimental studies include the development of particle-tracking methods for measuring velocity fields in unsteady flames and variable density jets. Research in turbulence simulation includes the development of spectral methods for simulating vortex rings, the development of topological methods for interpreting complex fields of data, and simulations of high Reynolds number compressible and incompressible wakes. Theoretical studies include predictions of the asymptotic behavior of drifting vortex pairs and vortex rings and use of group theoretical methods to study the nonlinear dynamics of turbulent fine-scale motions. Current projects include studies of fast-burning fuels for hybrid propulsion and decomposition of nitrous oxide for space propulsion.

  • Karen Casciotti

    Karen Casciotti

    Associate Professor of Earth System Science and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsAssistant Professor in EESS, focus on marine chemistry and biogeochemistry.

  • Page Chamberlain

    Page Chamberlain

    Professor of Geological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch
    I use stable and radiogenic isotopes to understand Earth system history. These studies examine the link between climate, tectonics, biological, and surface processes. Projects include: 1) examining the terrestrial climate history of the Earth focusing on periods of time in the past that had CO 2-levels similar to the present and to future projections; and 2) addressing how the chemical weathering of the Earth's crust affects both the long- and short-term carbon cycle. Field areas for these studies are in the Cascades, Rocky Mountains, Sierra Nevada, the European Alps, Tibet and the Himalaya and the Southern Alps of New Zealand.

    Teaching
    I teach courses at the undergraduate and graduate level in isotope biogeochemistry, Earth system history, and the relationship between climate, surface processes and tectonics. I also teach a three-week field course each September in the Wind River Mountains of Wyoming for sophomores and GES majors. This course covers topics in environmental and geological sciences.

    Professional Activities
    Editor American Journal of Science; Co-Director Stanford Stable Isotope Biogeochemistry Laboratory (present);Chair, Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences (2004-07); Co-Director Stanford/USGS SHRIMP Ion microprobe facility (2001-04)

  • Rebecca Chaplin

    Rebecca Chaplin

    Basic Life Science Research Associate, Academic Units

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests-
    Global modeling of ecosystem services. Information with global coverage is increasingly being demanded by decision-makers to support the Sustainable Development Goals, corporate supply chains, and investment decisions. However, to understand many ecosystem services operating at scales within individual landscapes, we need information about people and nature and the spatially-explicit socio-ecological processes linking them at higher resolution than ever before included in global assessment. I am leading global ecosystem services modeling at fine (<500 m) resolutions, under current conditions and future scenarios of change in population, climate and land-use. The aim of this work is to consider how nature’s contribution to people changes in those contexts – both from the perspective of what proportion of the total change in ecosystem services is due to changes in nature, and who is most impacted by those changes.

    -
    Remote-sensing of ecosystem quality and functions to improve ecosystem service models. Current ecosystem service assessment tools rely on categorical habitat types, despite ecological evidence that habitat quality determines ecosystem service provisioning. Furthermore, many of the most urgent development decisions are occurring in very data-poor regions, where model parameters are often uncalibrated and accuracy is therefore limited. My new work is exploring linkages of ecosystem service models or field data and the remote-sensing of continuous habitat measures such as ground cover, productivity, phenology, or evapotranspiration and other ecosystem fluxes, to improve the accuracy and ease with which models can be parameterized and calibrated.

    -
    Ecosystem models to link multiple ecosystem services in decision-support tools. The state of the art in ecosystem service assessments, even those considering trade-offs between different services, model services individually. This failure to account for any interactions or feedbacks between services prevents anticipation of ecological surprises and may mask potential synergies if the provision of one service can enhance another. I am currently leading a project linking the ecosystem model Century and a livestock physiology model to drive management-driven responses in rangeland quality that in turn drive additional ecosystem service models (such as water provision and water quality).

  • Bruce Clemens

    Bruce Clemens

    Walter B. Reinhold Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor of Photon Science

    BioClemens studies growth and structure of thin film, interface and nanostructured materials for catalytic, electronic and photovoltaic applications. He and his group investigate phase transitions and kinetics in nanostructured materials, and perform nanoparticle engineering for hydrogen storage and catalysis. Recently he and his collaborators have developed nano-portals for efficient injection of hydrogen into storage media, dual-phase nanoparticles for catalysis, amorphous metal electrodes for semiconductor devices, and a lift-off process for forming free-standing, single-crystal films of compound semiconductors.

  • Craig Criddle

    Craig Criddle

    Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Senior Fellow, by courtesy, at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    BioCriddle's research focuses on biotechnology and microbial ecology for clean water, clean energy, and healthy ecosystems.

  • Larry B. Crowder

    Larry B. Crowder

    Edward Ricketts Provostial Professor and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsEcology, conservation, fisheries, protected species, ecosystem-based management

  • Mariano-Florentino Cuéllar

    Mariano-Florentino Cuéllar

    Visiting Professor, Stanford Law School

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsAdministrative law and public organizations; domestic aspects of national security; transnational crime; citizenship, migration and the nation-state; public health law.

  • Mark R. Cullen, MD

    Mark R. Cullen, MD

    Director, Center for Population Health Sciences, Senior Associate Vice Provost for Research, Professor of Medicine (Primary Care and Population Health), of Biomedical Data Science, of HRP (Epidemiology) and Senior Fellow at SIEPR

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsSocial and environmental determinants of health; role of workplace physical environment and work organization as causes of chronic disease and disability

  • Gretchen C. Daily

    Gretchen C. Daily

    Bing Professor in Environmental Science and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsLand use, biodiversity dynamics, ecosystem services

  • Reinhold H. Dauskardt

    Reinhold H. Dauskardt

    Ruth G. and William K. Bowes Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor, by courtesy, of Surgery

    BioDauskardt and his group have worked extensively on integrating new materials into emerging technologies including thin-film structures for nanoscience and energy technologies, high-performance composite and laminates for aerospace, and on biomaterials and soft tissues in bioengineering. His group has pioneered methods for characterizing adhesion and cohesion of thin films used extensively in device technologies. His research on wound healing has concentrated on establishing a biomechanics framework to quantify the mechanical stresses and biologic responses in healing wounds and define how the mechanical environment affects scar formation. Experimental studies are complimented with a range of multiscale computational capabilities. His research includes interaction with researchers nationally and internationally in academia, industry, and clinical practice.

  • Jenna Davis

    Jenna Davis

    Associate Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsProfessor Davis’ research and teaching deals broadly with the role that water and sanitation services play in promoting public health and economic development, with particular emphasis on low- and middle-income countries. Her group conducts applied research that utilizes theory and analytical methods from public and environmental health, engineering, microeconomics, and planning. They have conducted field research in more than 20 countries, most recently including Zambia, Bangladesh, and Kenya.

  • Giulio De Leo

    Giulio De Leo

    Professor of Biology and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI am a theoretical ecologist mostly interested in investigating factors and processes driving the dynamics of natural and harvested populations and on how to use this knowledge to inform practical management. I have worked broadly on life histories analysis, fishery management, dynamics and control of infectious diseases and environmental impact assessment.

  • Noah Diffenbaugh

    Noah Diffenbaugh

    Kara J. Foundation Professor and Kimmelman Family Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Noah S. Diffenbaugh is an Editor of the peer-review journal Geophysical Research Letters, and a Lead Author for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). He is a recipient of the James R. Holton Award from the American Geophysical Union, a CAREER award from the National Science Foundation, and a Terman Fellowship from Stanford University. He has also been recognized as a Kavli Fellow by the U.S. National Academy of Sciences, and as a Google Science Communication Fellow.

  • Rodolfo Dirzo

    Rodolfo Dirzo

    Bing Prof in Environmental Science and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsEcological and evolutionary aspects of plant-animal interactions, largely but not exclusively, in tropical forest ecosystems.
    Conservation biology in tropical ecosystems.
    Studies on biodiversity.
    Education, at all levels, on scientific practice, ecology and biodiversity conservation.

  • Rob Dunbar

    Rob Dunbar

    W.M. Keck Professor in the School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences and Senior Fellow, by courtesy, at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOcean processes, biogeochemistry, climatology/paleoclimatology, isotopic chemistry, ocean policy

  • Louis Durlofsky

    Louis Durlofsky

    Otto N. Miller Professor in Earth Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsGeneral reservoir simulation, optimization, reduced-order modeling, upscaling, flow in fractured systems, history matching, CO2 sequestration, energy systems optimization

  • Paul Ehrlich

    Paul Ehrlich

    Bing Professor of Population Studies, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe role of the social sciences in dealing with global change

  • Kathleen M. Eisenhardt

    Kathleen M. Eisenhardt

    Stanford W. Ascherman, M.D. Professor in the School of Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsTheoretical approaches: Complexity and power theories as well as theories of individual and group cognition related to heuristics, analogies, and integrative thinking

    Methods: Theory building from multiple studies as well as simulation, formal modeling and statistical analyses

    Recent research: Strategy as "simple rules", strategic interaction in novel markets and ecosystems, strategy making by boards of directors, and policies for economic growth in Japan, China and Chile

  • W Gary Ernst

    W Gary Ernst

    The Benjamin M. Page Professor in Earth Sciences, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPetrology/geochemistry and plate tectonics of Circumpacific and Alpine mobile belts; ultrahigh-pressure metamorphism in Eurasia; geology of the California Coast Ranges, the cental Klamath Mountains, and White-Inyo Range; geobotany and remote sensing of the American Southwest; mineralogy and human health.

  • Walter Falcon

    Walter Falcon

    Helen C. Farnsworth Professor of International Agricultural Policy, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interestsbiotechnology; food security; food and agricultural policy in developing countries

  • Marcus Feldman

    Marcus Feldman

    Burnet C. and Mildred Finley Wohlford Professor in the School of Humanities and Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsHuman genetic and cultural evolution, mathematical biology, demography of China

  • Chris Field

    Chris Field

    Melvin and Joan Lane Professor for Interdisciplinary Environmental Studies, Director, Woods Institute for the Environment, Professor of Earth System Science, of Biology and Senior Fellow at the Precourt Institute for Energy

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch
    My field is global ecology, and my research emphasizes ecological contributions across the range of Earth science disciplines. My colleagues and I develop diverse approaches to quantifying large-scale ecosystem processes, using satellites, atmospheric data, models, and census data, and explore global-scale patterns of vegetation-climate feedbacks, carbon cycle dynamics, primary production, forest management, and fire. At the ecosystem-scale, we conduct experiments on grassland responses to global change, which integrate approaches from molecular biology to remote sensing.

    Teaching
    I am one of five professors who teach the Earth Systems field studies course for advanced undergrads and co-terms at Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve. I also teach an introductory seminar on climate change for freshmen.

    Professional Activities
    Director, Department of Global Ecology, Carnegie Institution; Faculty Director, Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve; Professor, Department of Environmental Earth System Science, Stanford University; Senior Fellow, Woods Institute for the Environment, Stanford University; Senior Fellow, Precourt Institute for Energy, Stanford University; Melvin and Joan Lane Professor for Interdisciplinary Environmental Studies, Stanford University

  • Mollie Field

    Mollie Field

    Conference Services Manager, Woods Institute

    Current Role at StanfordMollie plans and implement workshops, dialogues and special events for the Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment.

  • Christopher Francis

    Christopher Francis

    Professor of Earth System Science and Senior Fellow, by courtesy, at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMicrobial cycling of carbon, nitrogen, and metals in the environment; molecular geomicrobiology; marine microbiology; microbial diversity

  • David Freyberg

    David Freyberg

    Associate Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy students and I study sediment and water balances in aging reservoirs, hydrologic responses and landslide risk induced by precipitation patterns in the Northern Range of Trinidad, the design of centralized and decentralized wastewater collection, treatment, and reuse systems in urban areas, and hydrologic ecosystem services in urban areas and in systems for which sediment production, transport, and deposition have significant consequences.

  • Oliver Fringer

    Oliver Fringer

    Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    BioFringer's research focuses on the development and application of numerical models and high-performance computational techniques to the study of fundamental processes that influence the dynamics of the coastal ocean, rivers, lakes, and estuaries.

  • Christopher Gardner

    Christopher Gardner

    Rehnborg Farquhar Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe role of nutrition in individual and societal health, with particular interests in: plant-based diets, differential response to low-carb vs. low-fat weight loss diets by insulin resistance status, chronic disease prevention, randomized controlled trials, human nutrition, community based studies, Community Based Participatory Research, sustainable food movement (animal rights and welfare, global warming, human labor practices), stealth health, nutrition policy, nutrition guidelines

  • William Gilly

    William Gilly

    Professor of Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy work has contributed to understanding electrical excitability in nerve & muscle in organisms ranging from brittle-stars to mammals. Current research addresses behavior, physiology and ecology of squid through field and lab approaches. Electronic tagging plus in situ video, acoustic and oceanographic methods are used to study behaviors and life history in the field. Lab work focuses on control of chromogenic behavior by the chromatophore network and of locomotion by the giant axon system.

  • Megan Glatzel

    Megan Glatzel

    Program Coordinator, Water in the West, Woods Institute

    BioMegan joined the Water in the West program in October 2016. In her role as program coordinator she serves as the editor for the Water in the West Newsletter, manages social media accounts, maintains website and mailing lists, provides administrative support to researchers, organizes monthly All Hands meetings and assists on special projects. Before coming to Water in the West, Megan worked in the Stanford Department of Economics as a faculty support administrator from 2010-2016.

    Megan received her B.A. in Environmental Studies from University of California, Santa Barbara. She enjoys spending her time baking, exploring new cities, and reading.

  • Jeremy Goldhaber-Fiebert

    Jeremy Goldhaber-Fiebert

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Primary Care & Outcomes Research) and, by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy

    BioJeremy Goldhaber-Fiebert, PhD, is an Associate Professor of Medicine, a Core Faculty Member at the Centers for Health Policy/Primary Care and Outcomes Research, and a Faculty Affiliate of the Stanford Center on Longevity and Stanford Center for International Development. His research focuses on complex policy decisions surrounding the prevention and management of increasingly common, chronic diseases and the life course impact of exposure to their risk factors. In the context of both developing and developed countries including the US, India, China, and South Africa, he has examined chronic conditions including type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases, human papillomavirus and cervical cancer, tuberculosis, and hepatitis C and on risk factors including smoking, physical activity, obesity, malnutrition, and other diseases themselves. He combines simulation modeling methods and cost-effectiveness analyses with econometric approaches and behavioral economic studies to address these issues. Dr. Goldhaber-Fiebert graduated magna cum laude from Harvard College in 1997, with an A.B. in the History and Literature of America. After working as a software engineer and consultant, he conducted a year-long public health research program in Costa Rica with his wife in 2001. Winner of the Lee B. Lusted Prize for Outstanding Student Research from the Society for Medical Decision Making in 2006 and in 2008, he completed his PhD in Health Policy concentrating in Decision Science at Harvard University in 2008. He was elected as a Trustee of the Society for Medical Decision Making in 2011.

    Past and current research topics:

    - Type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular risk factors: Randomized and observational studies in Costa Rica examining the impact of community-based lifestyle interventions and the relationship of gender, risk factors, and care utilization.

    -Cervical cancer: Model-based cost-effectiveness analyses and costing methods studies that examine policy issues relating to cervical cancer screening and human papillomavirus vaccination in countries including the United States, Brazil, India, Kenya, Peru, South Africa, Tanzania, and Thailand.

    - Measles, haemophilus influenzae type b, and other childhood infectious diseases: Longitudinal regression analyses of country-level data from middle and upper income countries that examine the link between vaccination, sustained reductions in mortality, and evidence of herd immunity.

    - Patient adherence: Studies in both developing and developed countries of the costs and effectiveness of measures to increase successful adherence. Adherence to cervical cancer screening as well as to disease management programs targeting depression and obesity is examined from both a decision-analytic and a behavioral economics perspective.

    - Simulation modeling methods: Research examining model calibration and validation, the appropriate representation of uncertainty in projected outcomes, the use of models to examine plausible counterfactuals at the biological and epidemiological level, and the reflection of population and spatial heterogeneity.

  • Andrea Goldsmith

    Andrea Goldsmith

    Stephen Harris Professor in the School of Engineering

    BioAndrea Goldsmith is the Stephen Harris professor in the School of Engineering and professor of Electrical Engineering at Stanford University. She also co-founded and served as Chief Technical Officer of Plume WiFi and of Quantenna (QTNA), and she currently serves on the corporate or technical advisory boards of Crown Castle Inc. (CCI), Interdigital Corp. (IDCC), Sequans (SQNS), Quantenna (QTNA) and Cohere. Her research interests are in the design, analysis, and fundamental performance limits of wireless systems and networks, as well as in the application of communication theory and signal processing to neuroscience. Prior to Stanford she held positions at Caltech, Maxim Technologies, Memorylink Corporation, and AT&T Bell Laboratories. Dr. Goldsmith is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a Fellow of the IEEE and of Stanford, and has received several awards for her work, including the IEEE Eric E. Sumner Technical Field Award in Communications Technology, the ComSoc Edwin H. Armstrong Achievement Award as well as Technical Achievement Awards in Communications Theory and in Wireless Communications, the National Academy of Engineering Gilbreth Lecture Award, and the Silicon Valley/San Jose Business Journal’s Women of Influence Award. She is author of the book ``Wireless Communications'' and co-author of the books ``MIMO Wireless Communications'' and “Principles of Cognitive Radio,” all published by Cambridge University Press, as well as an inventor on 28 patents. She has served in various leadership roles in the IEEE and in industrial groups aimed at diversifying STEM fields. At Stanford she has served as Chair and a member of the Faculty Senate and on the Planning and Policy Board, Committee on Research, Commissions on Graduate Education and on Undergraduate Education, and the Task Force on Women and Leadership. She currently serves on Stanford's Budget Group, Advisory Board, Faculty Women's Forum Steering Committee, and in the Faculty Senate.

  • Deborah M Gordon

    Deborah M Gordon

    Professor of Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsProfessor Deborah M Gordon studies the evolutionary ecology of collective behavior. Ant colonies operate without central control, using local interactions to regulate colony behavior.

  • Steven Gorelick

    Steven Gorelick

    Cyrus Fisher Tolman Professor in the School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch
    As a hydrogeologist, my research involves the study of water resources and water security with emphasis on groundwater. Using lab and field data, our aim is to develop an understanding of fundamental aspects of the transport of water and contaminants, and to investigate regional water resources systems. We have developed simulation-based planning tools to aid in sustainable agricultural and urban water management in the US, Mexico, India, and Jordan. With my colleagues, we have initiated the Global Freshwater Initiative, which studies water resources vulnerability problems throughout the world. During the past 14 years, our field investigations have focused on the interactions between groundwater and patterns of vegetation in studies of both meadow and salt-marsh ecohydrology. Scales of physical processes of interest extend from the domain of small pores to vast regional subsurface flow environments. Although driven by observations and data, we develop conceptual and quantitative models to rigorously understand physical processes, make predictions, and explore the impacts of new water management policies, such as taxes, quota, and markets. Such models enhance our understanding of groundwater flow behavior and provide the means to better manage water resources.

    Teaching
    I teach courses for graduate and undergraduate students involving principles and methods used in physical and contaminant hydrogeology. In addition, I run a seminar series that exposes students to a variety of multidisciplinary topics involving hydrology.

    Professional Activities
    2016 Fellow, American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS),
    2014 Best Paper in Environmental Research Letters in 2014 (Padowski and Gorelick, (2014), 2013 Editor's Choice Award, Water Resources Research for paper Srinivasan et al., (2012), Member, US National Academy of Engineering (2012), International Fellow, Institute for Environmental Science and Research (ESR) (2011), New Zealand, Fulbright Senior Scholar (2008-09); Chester C. Keisel Memorial Lecturer, University of Arizona (2008); Best Paper Award in Computers and Geosciences, International Association for Mathematical Geology (2006); fellow, John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation (2005); Stanford representative to the Consortium of Universities for Advancement of Hydrologic Sciences (2005-2008); M. King Hubbert Science Award, NGWA (2004); Ineson Distinguished Lecturer (1998); Fulbright Senior Scholar (1997); O.E. Meinzer Award, GSA (1994) James B. Macelwane medal, AGU (1990); Fellow, GSA (1988) and AGU (1990); Editorial Board, Optimization and Engineering Journal (1990-present); visiting professor, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Ecological Engineering Laboratory (2006); visiting professor, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, jointly at the Swiss Federal Institute for Environmental Science and Technology (2005); visiting scholar, University of Cambridge, Zoology (2007); visiting scientist, CSIRO, Perth, Australia (2009); Member AGU Water and Society Technical Committee (2011-present) visiting professor, University of Western Australia Centre for Ecohydrology (2012); visiting professor, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology ETH Zurich (2013).

  • Mark Granovetter

    Mark Granovetter

    The Joan Butler Ford Professor in the School of Humanities and Sciences

    BioMark Granovetter's main interest is in the way people, social networks and social institutions interact and shape one another. He has written extensively on this subject, including his two most widely cited articles "The Strength of Weak Ties" (1973) and "Economic Action and Social Structure: The Problem of Embeddedness" (1985). In recent years, his focus has been on the social foundations of the economy, and he is working on a book entitled Society and Economy, to be published by Harvard University Press in two volumes. The first volume, Society and Economy: Framework and Principles,appeared in 2017. It is broadly theoretical, treating the role in the economy of social networks, norms, culture, trust, power, and social institutions. The second volume will use this framework to illuminate the study of such important topics as corruption, corporate governance, organizational form and the emergence of new industries such as the American electricity industry and the high-tech industry of Silicon Valley.

  • Leonidas Guibas

    Leonidas Guibas

    Paul Pigott Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsGeometric and topological data analysis and machine learning. Algorithms for the joint analysis of collections of images, 3D models, or trajectories. 3D reconstruction.

  • Elizabeth Hadly

    Elizabeth Hadly

    Paul S. and Billie Achilles Professor in Environmental Biology, Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment and Professor, by courtesy, of Geological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe research of Elizabeth Hadly probes how perturbations such as climatic change and human modification of the environment influence the evolution and ecology of vertebrates.

  • James Harris

    James Harris

    James and Elenor Chesebrough Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor, by courtesy, of Materials Science and Engineering and of Applied Physics

    BioHarris utilizes molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) of III-V compound semiconductor materials to investigate new materials for electronic and optoelectronic devices. He utilizes heterojunctions, superlattices, quantum wells, and three-dimensional self-assembled quantum dots to create metastable engineered materials with novel or improved properties for electronic and optoelectronic devices. He has recently focused on integration of photonic devices and micro optics for creation of new minimally invasive bio and medical systems for micro-array and neural imaging.

  • Jerry Harris

    Jerry Harris

    The Cecil H. and Ida M. Green Professor in Geophysics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsBiographical Information
    Jerry M. Harris is the Cecil and Ida Green Professor of Geophysics and Associate Dean for the Office of Multicultural Affairs. He joined Stanford in 1988 following 11 years in private industry. He served five years as Geophysics department chair, was the Founding Director of the Stanford Center for Computational Earth and Environmental Science (CEES), and co-launched Stanford's Global Climate and Energy Project (GCEP). Graduates from Jerry's research group, the Stanford Wave Physics Lab, work in private industry, government labs, and universities.

    Research
    My research interests address the physics and dynamics of seismic and electromagnetic waves in complex media. My approach to these problems includes theory, numerical simulation, laboratory methods, and the analysis of field data. My group, collectively known as the Stanford Wave Physics Laboratory, specializes on high frequency borehole methods and low frequency labratory methods. We apply this research to the characterization and monitoring of petroleum and CO2 storage reservoirs.

    Teaching
    I teach courses on waves phenomena for borehole geophysics and tomography. I recently introduced and co-taught a new course on computational geosciences.

    Professional Activities
    I was the First Vice President of the Society of Exploration Geophysicists in 2003-04, and have served as the Distinguished Lecturer for the SPE, SEG, and AAPG.

  • Martin Hellman

    Martin Hellman

    Professor of Electrical Engineering, Emeritus

    BioMartin E. Hellman is Professor Emeritus of Electrical Engineering at Stanford University and is affiliated with the university's Center for International Security and Cooperation (CISAC). His recent technical work has focused on bringing a risk informed framework to a potential failure of nuclear deterrence and then using that approach to find surprising ways to reduce the risk. His earlier work included co-inventing public key cryptography, the technology that underlies the secure portion of the Internet. His many honors include election to the National Academy of Engineering and receiving (jointly with his colleague Whit Diffie) the million dollar ACM Turing Award, the top prize in computer science. His most recent project is a book, jointly written with his wife of fifty years, "A New Map for Relationships: Creating True Love at Home & Peace on the Planet," that provides a “unified field theory” of peace by illuminating the connections between nuclear war, conventional war, interpersonal war, and war within our own psyches.

  • Lynn Hildemann

    Lynn Hildemann

    Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    BioLynn Hildemann's current research areas include the sources and dispersion of indoor aerosols, the physicochemical properties of organic aerosols, and assessment of human exposure to PM.

    Prof. Hildemann received BS, MS, and PhD degrees in environmental engineering science from the California Institute of Technology. She is an author on >80 peer-reviewed publications, including three with over 700 citations each, and another 16 with over 100 citations each. She has been honored with Young Investigator Awards from NSF and ONR, the Kenneth T. Whitby Award from the AAAR (1998), and Stanford's Gores Award for Teaching Excellence (2013); she also was a co-recipient of Atmospheric Environment’s Haagen-Smit Outstanding Paper Award (2001).

    She has served on advisory committees for the Bay Area Air Quality Management District and for the California Air Resources Board. She has been an Associate Editor for Environmental Science & Technology, and Aerosol Science and Technology. She currently is on the advisory board for the journal Environmental Science & Technology.

    At Stanford, Prof. Hildemann is currently chair of the Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering. She has chaired the School of Engineering Library Committee and the University Committee on Judicial Affairs, and serves as an elected member of the University Faculty Senate.

  • Patricia Hines

    Patricia Hines

    Assistant Director, Administration, Woods Institute

    Current Role at StanfordPatti is the Assistant Director, Administration in the Stanford Woods Institute. She handles all human resource and faculty affairs matters, has oversight of executive office operations and support of donor relations and activities including the Stanford Woods Institute Advisory Council.

    Prior to joining Woods in 2006, Patti was the Program Manager at American Leadership Forum-Silicon Valley.

  • Roland Horne

    Roland Horne

    Thomas Davies Barrow Professor in the School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences and Senior Fellow at the Precourt Institute for Energy

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWell Testing, Optimisation and Geothermal Reservoir Engineering

  • Gianluca Iaccarino

    Gianluca Iaccarino

    Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Director, Institute for Computational and Mathematical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsComputing and data for energy, health and engineering

    Challenges in energy sciences, green technology, transportation, and in general, engineering design and prototyping are routinely tackled using numerical simulations and physical testing. Computations barely feasible two decades ago on the largest available supercomputers, have now become routine using turnkey commercial software running on a laptop. Demands on the analysis of new engineering systems are becoming more complex and multidisciplinary in nature, but exascale-ready computers are on the horizon. What will be the next frontier? Can we channel this enormous power into an increased ability to simulate and, ultimately, to predict, design and control? In my opinion two roadblocks loom ahead: the development of credible models for increasingly complex multi-disciplinary engineering applications and the design of algorithms and computational strategies to cope with real-world uncertainty.
    My research objective is to pursue concerted innovations in physical modeling, numerical analysis, data fusion, probabilistic methods, optimization and scientific computing to fundamentally change our present approach to engineering simulations relevant to broad areas of fluid mechanics, transport phenomena and energy systems. The key realization is that computational engineering has largely ignored natural variability, lack of knowledge and randomness, targeting an idealized deterministic world. Embracing stochastic scientific computing and data/algorithms fusion will enable us to minimize the impact of uncertainties by designing control and optimization strategies that are robust and adaptive. This goal can only be accomplished by developing innovative computational algorithms and new, physics-based models that explicitly represent the effect of limited knowledge on the quantity of interest.

    Multidisciplinary Teaching

    I consider the classical boundaries between disciplines outdated and counterproductive in seeking innovative solutions to real-world problems. The design of wind turbines, biomedical devices, jet engines, electronic units, and almost every other engineering system requires the analysis of their flow, thermal, and structural characteristics to ensure optimal performance and safety. The continuing growth of computer power and the emergence of general-purpose engineering software has fostered the use of computational analysis as a complement to experimental testing in multiphysics settings. Virtual prototyping is a staple of modern engineering practice! I have designed a new undergraduate course as an introduction to Computational Engineering, covering theory and practice across multidisciplanary applications. The emphasis is on geometry modeling, mesh generation, solution strategy and post-processing for diverse applications. Using classical flow/thermal/structural problems, the course develops the essential concepts of Verification and Validation for engineering simulations, providing the basis for assessing the accuracy of the results.

  • John P.A. Ioannidis

    John P.A. Ioannidis

    C. F. Rehnborg Professor in Disease Prevention in the School, Professor of Medicine, of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology) and by courtesy, of Statistics and of Biomedical Data Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMeta-research
    Evidence-based medicine
    Clinical and molecular epidemiology
    Human genome epidemiology
    Research design
    Reporting of research
    Empirical evaluation of bias in research
    Randomized trials
    Statistical methods and modeling
    Meta-analysis and large-scale evidence
    Prognosis, predictive, personalized, precision medicine and health
    Sociology of science

  • Keith Iverson

    Keith Iverson

    IT/Web Manager, Woods Institute

    Current Role at StanfordIT/Web Manager at the Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment

  • Rob Jackson

    Rob Jackson

    Michelle and Kevin Douglas Provostial Professor and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment and at the Precourt Institute for Energy

    BioRob Jackson and his lab examine the many ways people affect the Earth. They seek basic scientific knowledge and use it to help shape policies and reduce the environmental footprint of global warming, energy extraction, and many other issues. They're currently examining the effects of climate change and droughts on forest mortality and grassland ecosystems. They are also working to measure and reduce greenhouse gas emissions through the Global Carbon Project (globalcarbonproject.org), which Jackson chairs; examples of new research Rob is leading include establishing a global network of methane tower measurements at more than 50 sites worldwide and measuring and reducing methane emissions from oil and gas wells, city streets, and homes and buildings.

    As an author and photographer, Rob has published a trade book about the environment (The Earth Remains Forever, University of Texas Press), two books of children’s poems, Animal Mischief and Weekend Mischief (Highlights Magazine and Boyds Mills Press), and recent or forthcoming poems in the journals Southwest Review, Cortland Review, Cold Mountain Review, Atlanta Review, The Lyric, and Measure. His photographs have appeared in many media outlets, including the NY Times, Washington Post, USA Today, US News and World Report, Science, Nature, and National Geographic News.

  • Mark Jacobson

    Mark Jacobson

    Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Senior Fellow at the Precourt Institute for Energy, and at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    BioMark Z. Jacobson’s career has focused on better understanding air pollution and global warming problems and developing large-scale clean, renewable energy solutions to them. Toward that end, he has developed and applied three-dimensional atmosphere-biosphere-ocean computer models and solvers to simulate air pollution, weather, climate, and renewable energy. He has also developed roadmaps to transition states and countries to 100% clean, renewable energy for all purposes and computer models to examine grid stability in the presence of high penetrations of renewable energy.

  • James Holland Jones

    James Holland Jones

    Associate Professor of Earth System Science and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI am a biological anthropologist with primary research interests in evolutionary demography and life history theory. In addition these fundamental interests in the evolution of human life histories, I work at the intersection of disease ecology, the analysis of dynamical systems, and social network analysis. My work combines the formalisms of population biology, statistics, and social network analysis to address fundamental problems in biodemography, epidemiology, and human decision-making in variable environments.

  • Abby C. King

    Abby C. King

    Professor of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology) and of Medicine (Stanford Prevention Research Center)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy interests include the application of behavioral theory and social ecological approaches to achieve large scale changes impacting chronic disease prevention and control; expanding the reach and translation of evidence-based interventions through state-of-the-art technologies; exploring social and physical environmental influences on health; applying community participatory research perspectives to address health disparities; and policy-level approaches to health promotion/disease prevention.

  • Herbert Klein

    Herbert Klein

    Professor of History (Teaching) and Senior Fellow, by courtesy, at the Hoover Institution

    BioI was born in New York City in the borough of the Bronx on January 6, 1936. I attended public schools in Far Rockaway Queens. After graduating Far Rockaway High School, I first attended Syracuse University from 1953 to 1955 and then transferred to the University of Chicago, where I obtained a BA in history in 1957, an MA in 1959 and a PhD in 1963 with a major in history and a minor in anthropology. I taught Latin American history at the University of Chicago from 1962 to 1969, rising from lecturer to the rank of associate professor with tenure. I then taught at Columbia University from 1969 to 2005, being named the Gouverneur Morris Professor of History in 2003. I retired from Columbia in 2005 and was named professor of history and director of the Center for Latin American Studies at Stanford University from 2005 to 2011. After my retirement as director, I was named research fellow and curator of Latin American Collection, of the Hoover Institution of Stanford University in 2011–2017.

    My main areas of interests are in comparative social history, quantitative methods in historical research and demographic history. I have published some 25 books dealing with the history of slavery, the Atlantic slave trade, colonial fiscal history, and demographic history and have published extensively on the history of Bolivia, Brazil and the United States. I has been a Woodrow Wilson Fellow, a Guggenheim Fellow, a Fulbright Lecturer in numerous Latin American universities and received grants from the Ford Foundation, the Social Science Research Council, the National Science Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Tinker Foundation.

    My honors include the 1977 "Socio-Psychological Prize" of the AAAS (American Association for the Advancement of Science), joint with Jonathan Kelley; the 2010 Premio em Historia e Ciencias Sociais of the Academia Brasileira de Letras, for a co-authored book Escravismo em São Paulo e Minas Gerais (joint with Iraci Costa and Francisco Vidal Luna) and in 2015 I received the Distinguished Service Award from the Conference on Latin American History, the professional organization of Latin American historians. In 1982 I was elected chair of CLAH. I was also editor of the Cambridge University Press Series of Latin American Monographs from 2003-2015 and I am on numerous editorial boards for Iberian and Latin American Journals of History, Economics and Social Science..

  • Brian Knutson

    Brian Knutson

    Professor of Psychology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy lab and I seek to elucidate the neural basis of emotion (affective neuroscience), and explore implications for decision-making (neuroeconomics) and psychopathology (neurophenomics).

  • Jeffrey R. Koseff

    Jeffrey R. Koseff

    William Alden Campbell and Martha Campbell Professor in the School of Engineering and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    BioJeff Koseff, founding co-director of the Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment, is an expert in the interdisciplinary domain of environmental fluid mechanics. His research falls in the interdisciplinary domain of environmental fluid mechanics and focuses on the interaction between physical and biological systems in natural aquatic environments. Current research activities are in the general area of environmental fluid mechanics and focus on: turbulence and internal wave dynamics in stratified flows, transport and mixing in estuarine systems, phytoplankton dynamics in estuarine systems, coral reef, sea-grass and kelp-forest hydrodynamics, and the role of natural systems in coastal protection. Most recently he has begun to focus on the interaction between gravity currents and breaking internal waves in the near-coastal environment, and the transport of marine microplastics. Koseff has served on the Board of Governors of The Israel Institute of Technology, and has been a member of the Visiting Committees of the Civil and Environmental Engineering department at Carnegie-Mellon University, The Iowa Institute of Hydraulic Research, and Cornell University. He has also been a member of review committees for the College of Engineering at the University of Michigan, The WHOI-MIT Joint Program, and the University of Minnesota Institute on the Environment. He is a former member of the Independent Science Board of the Bay/Delta Authority. He was elected a Fellow of the American Physical Society in 2015, and received the Richard Lyman Award from Stanford University in the same year.