Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment


Showing 21-40 of 209 Results

  • Brian Blackburn

    Brian Blackburn

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Infectious Diseases

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy interests include parasitology and global health; I've investigated cryptosporidium and angiostrongylus outbreaks; schistosoma/strongyloides seroprevalence in refugees, and the distribution and impact of ITNs for malaria and filariasis prevention in Nigeria and India. I have done clinical and programmatic work at teaching hospitals in Liberia and Bangladesh and have opportunities for research in Bangladesh and Kenya, in collaboration with ICDDR,B and CDC, Kenya

  • Alexandria Boehm

    Alexandria Boehm

    Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    BioI am interested in pathogens in the environment including their sources, fate, and transport in natural and engineered systems. I am interested in understanding of how pathogens are transmitted to humans through contact with water, feces, and contaminated surfaces. My research is focused on key problems in both developed and developing countries with the overarching goal of designing and testing novel interventions and technologies for reducing the burden of disease.

    I am also interested broadly in coastal water quality where my work addresses the sources, transformation, transport, and ecology of biocolloids - specifically fecal indicator organisms, DNA, pathogens, and phytoplankton - as well as sources and fate of nitrogen. This knowledge is crucial to formulating new management policies and engineering practices that protect human and ecosystem health at the coastal margins.

  • Donna M. Bouley

    Donna M. Bouley

    Professor of Comparative Medicine at the Stanford University Medical Center, Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch interests: ocular pathology, host-pathogen interactions in infectious disease, infectious disease in frogs, phenotypic characterization of tg and ko mice, histopathology of minimally-invasive radiological ablation techniques (focused ultrasound, cryoablation).

  • Gordon Brown

    Gordon Brown

    Dorrell William Kirby Professor of Geology in the School of Earth Sciences, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsSurface and interface geochemistry; environmental fate of heavy metals; nanotechnology, applications of synchrotron radiation in geochemistry and mineralogy

  • Marshall Burke

    Marshall Burke

    Associate Professor of Earth System Science and Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies and at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    BioMarshall Burke is an associate professor in the Department of Earth System Science, deputy director at the Center on Food Security and the Environment, and center fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies (FSI) at Stanford University. He is also a faculty research fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research, and a co-founder of AtlasAI, a remote sensing start-up. His research focuses on social and economic impacts of environmental change and on measuring and understanding economic development in emerging markets. His work has appeared in both economic and scientific journals, including recent publications in Nature, Science, The Quarterly Journal of Economics, and The Lancet. He holds a PhD in agricultural and resource economics from the University of California, Berkeley and a BA in international relations from Stanford University.

    Prospective students should see my personal webpage, linked at right.

  • Bruce Cain

    Bruce Cain

    Charles Louis Ducommun Professor in Humanities and Sciences and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment, at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research and at the Precourt Institute for Energy

    BioBruce E. Cain is a Professor of Political Science at Stanford University and Director of the Bill Lane Center for the American West. He received a BA from Bowdoin College (1970), a B Phil. from Oxford University (1972) as a Rhodes Scholar, and a Ph D from Harvard University (1976). He taught at Caltech (1976-89) and UC Berkeley (1989-2012) before coming to Stanford. Professor Cain was Director of the Institute of Governmental Studies at UC Berkeley from 1990-2007 and Executive Director of the UC Washington Center from 2005-2012. He was elected the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2000 and has won awards for his research (Richard F. Fenno Prize, 1988), teaching (Caltech 1988 and UC Berkeley 2003) and public service (Zale Award for Outstanding Achievement in Policy Research and Public Service, 2000). His areas of expertise include political regulation, applied democratic theory, representation and state politics. Some of Professor Cain’s most recent publications include “Malleable Constitutions: Reflections on State Constitutional Design,” coauthored with Roger Noll in University of Texas Law Review, volume 2, 2009; “More or Less: Searching for Regulatory Balance,” in Race, Reform and the Political Process, edited by Heather Gerken, Guy Charles and Michael Kang, CUP, 2011; “Redistricting Commissions: A Better Political Buffer?” in The Yale Law Journal, volume 121, 2012; and Democracy More or Less (CUP, 2015). He is currently working on problems of environmental governance.

  • Brian Cantwell

    Brian Cantwell

    Edward C. Wells Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor of Mechanical Engineering

    BioProfessor Cantwell's research interests are in the area of turbulent flow. Recent work has centered in three areas: the direct numerical simulation of turbulent shear flows, theoretical studies of the fine-scale structure of turbulence, and experimental measurements of turbulent structure in flames. Experimental studies include the development of particle-tracking methods for measuring velocity fields in unsteady flames and variable density jets. Research in turbulence simulation includes the development of spectral methods for simulating vortex rings, the development of topological methods for interpreting complex fields of data, and simulations of high Reynolds number compressible and incompressible wakes. Theoretical studies include predictions of the asymptotic behavior of drifting vortex pairs and vortex rings and use of group theoretical methods to study the nonlinear dynamics of turbulent fine-scale motions. Current projects include studies of fast-burning fuels for hybrid propulsion and decomposition of nitrous oxide for space propulsion.

  • Rachel Anne Cardone

    Rachel Anne Cardone

    Deputy Director, Water Health and Development, Woods Institute

    BioRachel Cardone has spent over twenty years working in the water sector, with a focus on water and sanitation services in low- and middle-income countries. Her areas of experience include sector financing as well as organizational development, and has deep experience working with public, private, and non-profit actors on questions relating to risk assessment, program design, and measurement, evaluation, and learning frameworks. Prior to joining the Program on Water, Health & Development, Rachel worked as an independent consultant, and was a founding member of the Water, Sanitation & Hygiene Program at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. Rachel's research has been profiled by the New York Times, USA Today, and other mainstream media sites, as well as published in academic journals.

    Rachel has a BA, cum laude, from the University of Michigan–Ann Arbor with a focus in History (Anthropology minor) and a Master of Public Administration from Columbia University's School of International and Public Affairs, concentrating in Energy Policy & Finance.

  • Page Chamberlain

    Page Chamberlain

    Professor of Geological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch
    I use stable and radiogenic isotopes to understand Earth system history. These studies examine the link between climate, tectonics, biological, and surface processes. Projects include: 1) examining the terrestrial climate history of the Earth focusing on periods of time in the past that had CO 2-levels similar to the present and to future projections; and 2) addressing how the chemical weathering of the Earth's crust affects both the long- and short-term carbon cycle. Field areas for these studies are in the Cascades, Rocky Mountains, Sierra Nevada, the European Alps, Tibet and the Himalaya and the Southern Alps of New Zealand.

    International Collaborations
    Much of the research that I do has an international component. Specifically, I have collaborations with: 1) the Senckenberg Biodiversity and Climate Research Center in Frankfurt Germany as a Humboldt Fellow and 2) the Chinese University of Geosciences in Bejiing China where I collaborate with Professor Yuan Gao.

    Teaching
    I teach courses at the undergraduate and graduate level in isotope biogeochemistry, Earth system history, and the relationship between climate, surface processes and tectonics.

    Professional Activities
    Editor American Journal of Science; Co-Director Stanford Stable Isotope Biogeochemistry Laboratory (present);Chair, Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences (2004-07); Co-Director Stanford/USGS SHRIMP Ion microprobe facility (2001-04)

  • Rebecca Chaplin

    Rebecca Chaplin

    Senior Research Scientist

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests-
    Global modeling of ecosystem services. Information with global coverage is increasingly being demanded by decision-makers to support the Sustainable Development Goals, corporate supply chains, and investment decisions. However, to understand many ecosystem services operating at scales within individual landscapes, we need information about people and nature and the spatially-explicit socio-ecological processes linking them at higher resolution than ever before included in global assessment. I am leading global ecosystem services modeling at fine (<500 m) resolutions, under current conditions and future scenarios of change in population, climate and land-use. The aim of this work is to consider how nature’s contribution to people changes in those contexts – both from the perspective of what proportion of the total change in ecosystem services is due to changes in nature, and who is most impacted by those changes.

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    Remote-sensing of ecosystem quality and functions to improve ecosystem service models. Current ecosystem service assessment tools rely on categorical habitat types, despite ecological evidence that habitat quality determines ecosystem service provisioning. Furthermore, many of the most urgent development decisions are occurring in very data-poor regions, where model parameters are often uncalibrated and accuracy is therefore limited. My new work is exploring linkages of ecosystem service models or field data and the remote-sensing of continuous habitat measures such as ground cover, productivity, phenology, or evapotranspiration and other ecosystem fluxes, to improve the accuracy and ease with which models can be parameterized and calibrated.

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    Ecosystem models to link multiple ecosystem services in decision-support tools. The state of the art in ecosystem service assessments, even those considering trade-offs between different services, model services individually. This failure to account for any interactions or feedbacks between services prevents anticipation of ecological surprises and may mask potential synergies if the provision of one service can enhance another. I am currently leading a project linking the ecosystem model Century and a livestock physiology model to drive management-driven responses in rangeland quality that in turn drive additional ecosystem service models (such as water provision and water quality).

  • Bruce Clemens

    Bruce Clemens

    Walter B. Reinhold Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor of Photon Science

    BioClemens studies growth and structure of thin film, interface and nanostructured materials for catalytic, electronic and photovoltaic applications. He and his group investigate phase transitions and kinetics in nanostructured materials, and perform nanoparticle engineering for hydrogen storage and catalysis. Recently he and his collaborators have developed nano-portals for efficient injection of hydrogen into storage media, dual-phase nanoparticles for catalysis, amorphous metal electrodes for semiconductor devices, and a lift-off process for forming free-standing, single-crystal films of compound semiconductors.

  • Craig Criddle

    Craig Criddle

    Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCriddle's interests include microbial biotechnology for the circular economy, including recovery of clean water from used water, renewable energy, valuable materials that can replace fossil-carbon derived materials. Current projects include energy-efficient anaerobic wastewater treatment technology, assessment of new treatment trains that yield high quality water; fossil carbon plastics biodegradation, and biotechnology for production of bioplastics that can replace fossil carbon plastics.

  • Larry Crowder

    Larry Crowder

    Edward Ricketts Provostial Professor and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsEcology, conservation, fisheries, protected species, ecosystem-based management