Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment


Showing 21-30 of 199 Results

  • Alexandria Boehm

    Alexandria Boehm

    Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    BioI am interested in pathogens in the environment including their sources, fate, and transport in natural and engineered systems. I am interested in understanding of how pathogens are transmitted to humans through contact with water, feces, and contaminated surfaces. My research is focused on key problems in both developed and developing countries with the overarching goal of designing and testing novel interventions and technologies for reducing the burden of disease.

    I am also interested broadly in coastal water quality where my work addresses the sources, transformation, transport, and ecology of biocolloids - specifically fecal indicator organisms, DNA, pathogens, and phytoplankton - as well as sources and fate of nitrogen. This knowledge is crucial to formulating new management policies and engineering practices that protect human and ecosystem health at the coastal margins.

  • Donna M. Bouley

    Donna M. Bouley

    Professor of Comparative Medicine at the Stanford University Medical Center, Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch interests: ocular pathology, host-pathogen interactions in infectious disease, infectious disease in frogs, phenotypic characterization of tg and ko mice, histopathology of minimally-invasive radiological ablation techniques (focused ultrasound, cryoablation).

  • Gordon Brown

    Gordon Brown

    Dorrell William Kirby Professor of Geology in the School of Earth Sciences, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsSurface and interface geochemistry; environmental fate of heavy metals; nanotechnology, applications of synchrotron radiation in geochemistry and mineralogy

  • Katherine Burke

    Katherine Burke

    Human And Planetary Health Lead, Woods Institute
    Staff, Woods Institute

    BioKathy Burke is the Human and Planetary Health Lead at the Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment and a Senior Advisor at the School of Medicine's Center for Innovation in Global Health. She is a co-instructor in BIO 103/203 Human and Planetary Health. She works across campus advancing the field of human and planetary health, setting strategy, managing grants, and bringing new voices to campus.
    In 2019-20 she was a Distinguished Career Institute Fellow, studying climate impacts on health.
    From 2015-19, she served as Deputy Director of Stanford’s Center for Innovation in Global Health, where she co-created and led the inaugural Women Leaders in Global Health conference in 2017 and the international Planetary Health Alliance Annual Meeting in 2019, both at Stanford. She helped to found WomenLIFT, an innovative leadership training program for mid-career professionals around the world, supported by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.
    A magna cum laude graduate of Harvard University, Kathy began her career as a reporter, editor and publishing executive. She later earned an MBA from Northwestern University’s Kellogg School of Management and a Master of Science in Global Health Sciences from the University of California, San Francisco.
    Kathy enjoys working at the interfaces of disciplines and sectors and creating cross-cutting teams to address big social problems. Ms. Burke serves on the Board of Dean’s Advisers at the Harvard Chan School of Public Health and the Advisory Council for Stanford University Libraries.

  • Marshall Burke

    Marshall Burke

    Associate Professor of Earth System Science and Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies, at the Woods Institute for the Environment and at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research

    BioMarshall Burke is an associate professor in the Department of Earth System Science, deputy director at the Center on Food Security and the Environment, and center fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies (FSI) at Stanford University. He is also a faculty research fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research, and a co-founder of AtlasAI, a remote sensing start-up. His research focuses on social and economic impacts of environmental change and on measuring and understanding economic development in emerging markets. His work has appeared in both economic and scientific journals, including recent publications in Nature, Science, The Quarterly Journal of Economics, and The Lancet. He holds a PhD in agricultural and resource economics from the University of California, Berkeley and a BA in international relations from Stanford University.

    Prospective students should see my personal webpage, linked at right.

  • Bruce Cain

    Bruce Cain

    Charles Louis Ducommun Professor in the School of Humanities and Sciences and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment and at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research

    BioBruce E. Cain is a Professor of Political Science at Stanford University and Director of the Bill Lane Center for the American West. He received a BA from Bowdoin College (1970), a B Phil. from Oxford University (1972) as a Rhodes Scholar, and a Ph D from Harvard University (1976). He taught at Caltech (1976-89) and UC Berkeley (1989-2012) before coming to Stanford. Professor Cain was Director of the Institute of Governmental Studies at UC Berkeley from 1990-2007 and Executive Director of the UC Washington Center from 2005-2012. He was elected the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2000 and has won awards for his research (Richard F. Fenno Prize, 1988), teaching (Caltech 1988 and UC Berkeley 2003) and public service (Zale Award for Outstanding Achievement in Policy Research and Public Service, 2000). His areas of expertise include political regulation, applied democratic theory, representation and state politics. Some of Professor Cain’s most recent publications include “Malleable Constitutions: Reflections on State Constitutional Design,” coauthored with Roger Noll in University of Texas Law Review, volume 2, 2009; “More or Less: Searching for Regulatory Balance,” in Race, Reform and the Political Process, edited by Heather Gerken, Guy Charles and Michael Kang, CUP, 2011; “Redistricting Commissions: A Better Political Buffer?” in The Yale Law Journal, volume 121, 2012; and Democracy More or Less (CUP, 2015). He is currently working on problems of environmental governance.

  • Brian Cantwell

    Brian Cantwell

    Edward C. Wells Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Emeritus

    BioProfessor Cantwell's research interests are in the area of turbulent flow. Recent work has centered in three areas: the direct numerical simulation of turbulent shear flows, theoretical studies of the fine-scale structure of turbulence, and experimental measurements of turbulent structure in flames. Experimental studies include the development of particle-tracking methods for measuring velocity fields in unsteady flames and variable density jets. Research in turbulence simulation includes the development of spectral methods for simulating vortex rings, the development of topological methods for interpreting complex fields of data, and simulations of high Reynolds number compressible and incompressible wakes. Theoretical studies include predictions of the asymptotic behavior of drifting vortex pairs and vortex rings and use of group theoretical methods to study the nonlinear dynamics of turbulent fine-scale motions. Current projects include studies of fast-burning fuels for hybrid propulsion and decomposition of nitrous oxide for space propulsion.

  • Karen Casciotti

    Karen Casciotti

    Victoria and Roger Sant Director, Earth Systems Program, Professor of Earth System Science and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsAssistant Professor in EESS, focus on marine chemistry and biogeochemistry.