Wu Tsai Neurosciences Institute


Showing 31-40 of 489 Results

  • Nikolas Blevins, MD

    Nikolas Blevins, MD

    Larry and Sharon Malcolmson Professor in the School of Medicine and Professor, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery
    On Leave from 01/03/2022 To 02/28/2022

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsInner ear microendoscopy -- Developing techniques for minimally-invasive imaging of inner ear microanatomy and neural pysiology. Applications include improved cochlear implant development, inner ear regenerative techniques, inner ear surgery, and auditory physiology.

    Microsurgical robotics -- Developing scalable microsurgical instrumentation and robotic techniques for use in head and neck surgery.

    Surgical Simulation -- Immersive environment for temporal bone surgical simulation.

  • Kwabena Boahen

    Kwabena Boahen

    Professor of Bioengineering, of Electrical Engineering and, by courtesy, of Computer Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsLarge-scale models of sensory, perceptual and motor systems

  • Jo Boaler

    Jo Boaler

    Nomellini and Olivier Professor in the Graduate School of Education

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsStudying the Impact of a Mathematical Mindset Summer Intervention, HapCaps: Design and Validation of Haptic Devices for improving Finger Perception (with engineering & neuroscience) The effectiveness of a student online class (https://lagunita.stanford.edu/courses/Education/EDUC115-S/Spring2014/about) (NSF). Studies on mathematics and mindset with Carol Dweck and Greg Walton (various funders). Studying an online network and it's impact on teaching and learning (Gates foundation)

  • Cara Bohon

    Cara Bohon

    Clinical Associate Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences - Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research interests have focused on the neural bases of eating disorders. I am particularly interested in the way emotion and reward is processed in the brain and how that may contribute to eating behavior and food restriction. I hope to eventually translate biological research findings into treatments.

  • Paul Bollyky

    Paul Bollyky

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases) and of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe Bollyky Lab studies the immunology of chronic bacterial infections with an emphasis on Pseudomonas aeruginosa wound and lung infections in Diabetes and Cystic Fibrosis. Areas of particular interest include bacteriophages, biofilms, and host-pathogen interactions. Our goals are to gain insight into fundamental disease mechanisms and to generate novel therapies to improve human health.

  • Anna Maria Bombardieri

    Anna Maria Bombardieri

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy overall research goal is to advance clinical practice by providing anesthesiologists with data to most effectively maintain cerebral blood flow in the perioperative period.
    I am interested in the effect of the autonomic nervous system on cerebral blood flow regulation.
    I intend to combine regional anesthetic techniques and noninvasive bedside cerebral blood flow monitoring to understand the effect of the sympathetic system on cerebral blood flow.
    A secondary goal is to apply this new knowledge to investigate whether cervical sympathetic blocks improve long term neurological outcomes.

  • Steven Boxer

    Steven Boxer

    Camille Dreyfus Professor of Chemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPlease visit my website for complete information:
    http://www.stanford.edu/group/boxer/

  • Mark Brongersma

    Mark Brongersma

    Stephen Harris Professor and Professor of Materials Science and Engineering and, by courtesy, of Applied Physics
    On Partial Leave from 01/01/2022 To 06/30/2022

    BioMark Brongersma is a Professor in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at Stanford University. He received his PhD in Materials Science from the FOM Institute in Amsterdam, The Netherlands, in 1998. From 1998-2001 he was a postdoctoral research fellow at the California Institute of Technology. During this time, he coined the term “Plasmonics” for a new device technology that exploits the unique optical properties of nanoscale metallic structures to route and manipulate light at the nanoscale. His current research is directed towards the development and physical analysis of nanostructured materials that find application in nanoscale electronic and photonic devices. Brongersma received a National Science Foundation Career Award, the Walter J. Gores Award for Excellence in Teaching, the International Raymond and Beverly Sackler Prize in the Physical Sciences (Physics) for his work on plasmonics, and is a Fellow of the Optical Society of America, the SPIE, and the American Physical Society.

  • Helen Bronte-Stewart, MD, MS

    Helen Bronte-Stewart, MD, MS

    John E. Cahill Family Professor, Professor of Neurology and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research focus is human motor control and brain pathophysiology in movement disorders. Our overall goal is to understand the role of the basal ganglia electrical activity in the pathogenesis of movement disorders. We have developed novel computerized technology to measure fine, limb and postural movement. With these we are measuring local field potentials in basal ganglia nuclei in patients with Parkinson's disease and dystonian and correlating brain signalling with motor behavior.

  • Anne Brunet

    Anne Brunet

    Michele and Timothy Barakett Endowed Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur lab studies the molecular basis of longevity. We are interested in the mechanism of action of known longevity genes, including FOXO and SIRT, in the mammalian nervous system. We are particularly interested in the role of these longevity genes in neural stem cells. We are also discovering novel genes and processes involved in aging using two short-lived model systems, the invertebrate C. elegans and an extremely short-lived vertebrate, the African killifish N. furzeri.