School of Earth, Energy and Environmental Sciences


Showing 1-4 of 4 Results

  • Sibyl Diver

    Sibyl Diver

    Lecturer

    BioDr. Sibyl Diver is an interdisciplinary environmental scientist, a lecturer at Stanford University in the Earth Systems Program, and co-lead for the Stanford Environmental Justice Working Group. She does community-engaged research on Indigenous water governance, focusing on Pacific Northwest salmon watersheds. This includes research on co-management (or collaborative management) arrangements between Indigenous communities and state agencies. She received her PhD from Berkeley's Department of Environmental Science, Policy and Management, where she helped build the Karuk-UC Berkeley Collaborative, a group supporting the Karuk Tribe's eco-cultural revitalization strategy in Northern California.

    For the past 20 years, Sibyl has worked in partnership with community leaders on issues of Indigenous peoples and salmon around the North Pacific – in the Russian Far East, Alaska, Canada and the US. Previous to graduate school, she spent eight years doing international conservation work and facilitating international exchanges with community leaders as a Russian translator -- an experience that introduced her to the deep connections between salmon conservation and Indigenous peoples. She completed her undergraduate work at Stanford, earning a dual degree in Human Biology and Russian.

    For publications and CV, please see www.sibyldiver.com.

  • Thomas Hayden

    Thomas Hayden

    Professor of the Practice, Earth Systems Program

    BioThomas Hayden is Director of the Master of Arts in Earth Systems, Environmental Communication Program at Stanford University. He teaches science and environmental communication and journalism in Stanford's School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences and Graduate Program in Journalism. He came to Stanford in 2008, following a career of reporting and writing about science and environmental issues for national and international publications.

    Hayden’s journalism career began at Newsweek magazine in New York, where he was an American Association for the Advancement of Science Mass Media fellow in 1997. In 2000, he moved to US News & World Report in Washington, DC, where he covered science, the environment, medicine, culture and breaking news as a senior writer. Since 2005, Hayden has been a freelance journalist. His cover stories have appeared in publications including Wired, Smithsonian, National Geographic, Washington Post Book World and many others. He has reported from South America, Europe, and Asia; and North America from New Orleans to the Canadian Arctic.

    Hayden is coauthor of two books. He wrote the 2007 national bestseller On Call in Hell, about battlefield medicine in Iraq, with Navy doctor Richard Jadick. In 2008 he collaborated on the critically acclaimed Sex and War, about the biological evolution and cultural development of warfare through human history, with Malcolm Potts of the University of California, Berkeley. He was the lead writer on the 2010 9th revision of the iconic National Geographic Atlas of the World. And he was coeditor of and a contributor to The Science Writers' Handbook: Everything You Need to Know to Pitch, Publish and Prosper in the Digital Age, published in 2013.

    In 2005, Hayden taught science writing in The Writing Workshops at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore with his wife and fellow science journalist, Erika Check Hayden. He was a founding faculty member in the annual Banff Centre Science Communications workshop, where he taught from 2006 until 2010, and was involved as a speaker and trainer with the Leopold Leadership Program for environmental scientists from 2000 to 2013.

    Hayden graduated from his hometown school, the University of Saskatchewan, with a Bachelor of Science in Agriculture (honours) degree in applied microbiology and food science, and received an MS degree in marine biology from the University of Southern California. He completed five years of doctoral study in biological oceanography at USC, before leaving science for journalism with A.B.D. status. He spent more than nine months at sea cumulatively over five years, conducting oceanographic research from Southern California to San Francisco Bay, and from Antarctica to Easter Island.

    In 2015, Hayden helped launch a new graduate degree program in Stanford's School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences. The Master of Arts in Earth Systems, Environmental Communication degree is focussed on the study and practice of effective, engaging, accurate communication of complex environmental and Earth systems information to nonspecialist audiences.

  • Sara H. Hoagland

    Sara H. Hoagland

    Lecturer

    BioSara (Suki) Hoagland is a Lecturer in the Earth Systems Program of the School of Earth, Energy and Environmental Sciences. She directs the required internship program and team-teaches and mentors the “Senior Reflection and Capstone” series. She also teaches the Master's Seminar and the E-IPER Environmental Design and Research Seminar. Recently she also team taught “Gender, Land Rights and Climate Change”. Previously, she was the first Executive Director of Stanford University's Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in Environment and Resources, (now E-IPER). She was a Senior Lecturer in that program and in the Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment. She designed and taught courses for E-IPER such as Case Studies in Environmental Problem Solving, Global Environmental Ethics, and Sustainable Development in Costa Rica, which included a field seminar there. She also served as the faculty advisor to the Stanford Farm and the Stanford chapter of Engineers for a Sustainable World.

    From 1989 to 2000, Dr. Hoagland was Assistant Professor at the School of International Service at American University where she created the International Environment and Development Semester, which included three-week field practicums to East Africa and Central America. Dr. Hoagland was also the Director and Clinical Associate Professor for the Masters in Development Practice Program at the Josef Korbel School of International Studies at the University of Denver, where she also serves on the Board of Directors. She earned her BA in government from Wesleyan University, her MA in International Relations and Curriculum Development from the University of Denver, and her PhD in International Relations from American University.