School of Earth, Energy and Environmental Sciences


Showing 1-10 of 10 Results

  • Murray Duncan

    Murray Duncan

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Geological Sciences

    BioI am a marine scientist trying to understand how environmental conditions drive ecological patterns of fish and fisheries through a physiological lens. The goal is to generate knowledge that can be incorporated into fisheries management frameworks to enhance resource sustainability. I earned my PhD at the Department of Ichthyology and Fisheries Science, Rhodes University under the supervision prof. Warren Potts in the SAFER lab, Dr Nikki James and Dr Amanda Bates in the Physiological Diversity Lab at Southampton University. I subsequently did a postdoc with the South African Institute for Aquatic Biodiversity where I helped coordinate multiple research projects across southern Africa. I am currently based at Stanford University, working in Prof. Erik Sperling's Historical Geobiology Lab and Prof. Fio Micheli's lab at Hopkins Marine Station. During this postdoc I will use physiological models to predict climate impacts and identify spatial refugia of key California fishery species including Red Abalone and Purple Urchin.

  • Feng Ke

    Feng Ke

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Geological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI mainly focus on the electrical transport and optical properties of low-dimensional materials at extreme conditions, such as ultra-high pressure, low temperature, high magnetic-fields.

  • Pedro M. Monarrez

    Pedro M. Monarrez

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Geological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research at Stanford focuses on the evolution of body size of marine animals throughout the fossil record. Specifically, I am using body size as a predictor for marine animal extinction and origination throughout the last 500 million years. I am also working on body size evolution during intervals of rapid diversification of marine invertebrates during the early Paleozoic.

    My overall research interests broadly focus on stratigraphic paleobiology. In particular, I seek to understand the various environmental and biotic factors driving macroevolutionary patterns of marine invertebrates in the fossil record within a sequence stratigraphic context. I am also interested in the variation and reconciliation of local and regional expressions of global macroevolutionary patterns and perturbations, such as mass extinctions.

  • Nils Prieur

    Nils Prieur

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Geological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy Marie Skłodowska-Curie (EU) mobility grant focuses on training a Convolutional Neural Network to detect boulders automatically on planetary surfaces. The ability to automatically detect boulders will allow us to learn more about the crater ejection mechanisms and how they influence the important crater statistic method. This mobility grant is conducted in collaboration with Prof. Lapôtre, who leads the Earth & Planetary Surface Processes group at Stanford University.

  • Nikki Seymour

    Nikki Seymour

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Geological Sciences

    BioMy research primarily addresses the structural and thermal evolution of highly deformed continental crust. I am strongly field-oriented and particularly interested in the relationship between igneous & metamorphic processes and deformation from outcrop to regional scales, the influence of pluton emplacement on fault behavior, tectonic and metamorphic processes driving continental rifting and subduction, and processes that transport metal through the crust to form economic deposits.

  • David Zhen Yin

    David Zhen Yin

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Geological Sciences

    BioDavid Zhen Yin is the Postdoctoral Researcher working on Stanford-Chevron CoRE Project at SCERF (Stanford Center for Earth Resources Forecasting). He develops Bayesian Evidential Learning for predictions and uncertainty quantification of subsurface earth resources(including groundwater, oil&gas, geothermal reservoir and minerals).

    Prior to joining Stanford, David was a Research Associate (Reservoir Geophysics) at Edinburgh Time-Lapse Project at Heriot-Watt University in Scotland, leading a research project in collaboration with Equinor from 2016 to 2018. He developed the “WELL2SEIS” technique that efficiently integrate 4D seismic with reservoir engineering data to improve reservoir forecasting. This technique has been applied to seven North Sea projects by 2018, and has become Equinor's standard in-house technology. During this period, he was also a Technology Consultant at Equinor's Research Center in Bergen, Norway. David developed broad experience in working with complex projects involving the industry as well as broad knowledge about the fields.

    David obtained his PhD in Geosciences from Heriot-Watt University, UK, in 2016, and B.Eng from China University of Petroleum in 2011. His research interests include Bayesian Evidential Learning, geological modeling and uncertainty quantification. David has authored more than 10 publications in peer-reviewed journals and international conferences. He was awarded the SEG Frans and Alice Hammons Award in 2014.