School of Earth, Energy and Environmental Sciences


Showing 1-6 of 6 Results

  • Andrew Hennig

    Andrew Hennig

    Ph.D. Student in Earth System Science

    BioAntarctic ice sheet, both of which have exhibited significant mass loss over the past few decades. If the two ice sheets were to fully collapse, they could be responsible for up to 15m of global sea level rise (roughly equal parts from both). This sea level rise would not only pose serious problems for coastal settlements, but cause serious changes to ecosystems, and could profoundly alter the Earth’s ocean circulation.

    Current estimates of the mass balance for ice sheets are based primarily on satellite data. This data has become more accurate and more available than ever before, since the 1990s. While estimates can be provided by satellite data, satellites are limited by virtue of the fact that they can only evaluate the surface of the ice shelf. Recent research has shown that a significant amount of the mass loss from the West Antarctic ice sheet is happening underwater, along grounding lines, where deep waters, warmed by global warming, enter the area underneath the ice shelf, and melt the shelves from the bottom. This not only results in mass loss directly, but increases calving of glaciers into the ocean, further accelerating their loss. This melting, below the surface of the ice shelves, cannot be estimated by satellites.

    To get a better understanding of the impact of warmer deep waters on glacial retreat in Western Antarctica, we need to measure the melt more directly. Using highly precise measurements of salinity and isotopic composition of seawater in coastal regions of Western Antarctica, we can estimate the amount of glacial meltwater present in the oceanic adjacent to ice sheets. Gaining a greater understanding of the rates and locations of West Antarctic melting will be crucial to developing our understanding of future sea level rise, and other wider impacts.

  • Natalie Herbert

    Natalie Herbert

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Earth System Science

    BioNATALIE HERBERT is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow in Behavioral Science in the Department of Earth Systems Science and at the Woods Institute for the Environment. Her research investigates decision-making in the face of environmental risk. She completed her Ph.D. in 2020 at the Annenberg School for Communication, where she researched health and science communication with a focus on communicating scientific uncertainty. In 2020, Natalie was a Christine Mirzayan Science and Technology Policy Graduate Fellow at the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine; she was the Rosenblith Fellow in Policy and Global Affairs and the InterAcademy Partnership.

  • Natan Holtzman

    Natan Holtzman

    Ph.D. Student in Earth System Science

    BioNatan Holtzman is a fourth-year PhD student in the Earth System Science department working with Prof. Alexandra Konings. He uses remote sensing and modeling to study how water moves between the atmosphere, plants, and soil. Natan graduated from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 2016 with a B.S. with honors in Geological Sciences and minors in Mathematics and Biology.

  • Alison Hoyt

    Alison Hoyt

    Assistant Professor of Earth System Science

    BioAlison Hoyt is an incoming assistant professor of Earth System Science at Stanford. Her work focuses on understanding how biogeochemical cycles respond to human impacts, with a particular focus on the most vulnerable and least understood carbon stocks in the tropics and the Arctic. For more information, please visit her group website here: http://web.stanford.edu/people/ahoyt