School of Earth, Energy and Environmental Sciences


Showing 1-6 of 6 Results

  • Ayla Pamukcu

    Ayla Pamukcu

    Assistant Professor of Geological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI have long been fascinated by magmas and volcanic eruptions, for reasons ranging from purely academic (trying to understand the magmatic construction of Earth’s crust) to purely practical (developing effective monitoring and mitigation strategies for volcanic eruptions). Consequently, my research revolves around understanding how, when, where, and why magmas are stored, evolve, and ultimately do (or do not!) erupt.

    Within this context, I focus on two main themes: (1) the temporal, chemical, and physical, evolution of magmas, and (2) the interplay between magma storage conditions in the crust and magmatic processes. I employ a multi-faceted approach to explore these topics, integrating data from multiple scales and perspectives; my studies capitalize on information contained in field relations, crystal and melt inclusion textures (sizes, shapes, positions), crystal and volcanic glass geochemistry, geochronology, phase-equilibria and numerical modeling, and experiments. As a function of this approach, I am also engaged in the development of novel methods to address petrologic problems in new, better, and more refined ways than is currently possible.

    A major focus of my research has been on supereruptions – gigantic explosive eruptions the likes of which we have never seen in recorded human history – but I am continually exploring other kinds of magmatic systems. I am currently particularly interested in the links (or lack thereof) between extrusive (i.e., erupted) and intrusive (i.e., unerupted) magmas, similarities/differences between large- and small-volume eruptions, and similarities/differences between magmas generated at different levels of the crust. I have also had a longstanding interest in the interactions and relationships between humans and their geologic surroundings (particularly volcanoes).

  • Salvatore Pascale

    Salvatore Pascale

    Physical Science Research Scientist

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsSalvatore Pascale is a Research Scientist at the Department of Earth System Sciences at Stanford University.

    His interests lie in understanding the impact of climate natural variability and change on the hydroclimate, with a particular emphasis on high-impact weather events (e.g., droughts, extreme precipitation) in monsoonal, mediterranean and semi-arid climates. These are densely populated regions, which, given the seasonal or erratic nature of their rainfall regimes, are particularly exposed to climate variability and to the impacts of global warming. In his research, Salvatore combines observations, statistical techniques and dynamical theory, and comprehensive and idealized climate models.

  • Jonathan Payne

    Jonathan Payne

    Senior AssociateDeanfor FacultyAffairs, Professor of Geological Sciences and, by courtesy, of Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy goal in research is to understand the interaction between environmental change and biological evolution using fossils and the sedimentary rock record. How does environmental change influence evolutionary and ecological processes? And conversely, how do evolutionary and ecological changes affect the physical environment? I work primarily on the marine fossil record over the past 550 million years.

  • Ryan Petterson

    Ryan Petterson

    Lecturer

    Current Role at StanfordDirector of Field Education, School of Earth, Energy, and Environmental Sciences

  • David Pollard

    David Pollard

    The Barney and Estelle Morris Professor of Earth Sciences, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research aims to understand how faults and fractures initiate and evolve in Earth's brittle crust, how they affect the flow of molten rock, groundwater, and hydrocarbons, and the crucial role faults and fractures play in earthquake generation, folding of sedimentary strata, and volcanic eruption.