School of Earth, Energy and Environmental Sciences


Showing 1-100 of 140 Results

  • Kevin Arrigo

    Kevin Arrigo

    Donald and Donald M. Steel Professor in Earth Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsInvestigates role of ocean biology in gobal carbon and nutrient cycles.

  • Atilla Aydin

    Atilla Aydin

    Professor (Research) of Geological and Environmental Sciences, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsFormation, geometric patterns and fluid flow properties of fractures and faults in a broad range of scales.

  • Inês M.L. Azevedo

    Inês M.L. Azevedo

    Associate Professor of Energy Resources Engineering and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsProfessor Azevedo is passionate about solving problems that include environmental, technical, economic, and policy issues, where traditional engineering approaches play an important role but cannot provide a complete answer. In particular, she is interested in assessing how energy systems are likely to evolve, which requires comprehensive knowledge of the technologies that can address future energy needs and the decision-making process followed by various agents in the economy.

  • Khalid Aziz

    Khalid Aziz

    Otto N. Miller Professor in the School of Earth Sciences, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOptimization and reservoir Simulation.

  • Susannah Barsom

    Susannah Barsom

    Lecturer

    BioSusannah Barsom joined the E-IPER staff in spring of 2016, and is the chief academic staff officer of E-IPER, with responsibility for overall program management. She works on program and curriculum development, student advising, and strategic planning, and collaborates with E-IPER and School colleagues to ensure effective management of the program.

    Before coming to Stanford, Sue was a faculty member at The Pennsylvania State University, where she served in the Sustainability Institute as Director of Academic Programs and, prior to that, in the Department of Biobehavioral Health. A biological anthropologist with degrees in anthropology from Wellesley College (BA), the University of Arizona (MA) and Penn State University (PhD), Sue has focused her research on human reproductive ecology and women’s reproductive health in North American and Venezuelan populations. More recently she has been engaged in research on sustainability education.

    Having spent her formative years in Laramie, Wyoming, Sue is glad to be back in the West after a long absence. When she's not working on E-IPER projects, she enjoys spending time with family and friends, reading, and appreciating the outdoors—bicycling, hiking, gardening, and most other activities on offer.

  • Ilenia Battiato

    Ilenia Battiato

    Assistant Professor of Energy Resources Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsEnergy and environment (battery systems; superhydrophobicity and drag reduction; carbon sequestration); multiscale, mesoscale and hybrid simulations (multiphase and reactive transport processes); effective medium theories; perturbation methods, homogenization and upscaling.

  • Sally Benson

    Sally Benson

    Precourt Family Professor and Director, Precourt Institute for Energy

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research is focused on reducing the risks of climate change by developing energy supplies with low carbon emissions. Students and post-doctoral fellows in my research group work on carbon dioxide storage, energy systems analysis, and pathways for transitioning to a low-carbon energy system.

  • Greg Beroza

    Greg Beroza

    Wayne Loel Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsEarthquake seismology

  • Biondo Biondi

    Biondo Biondi

    Barney and Estelle Morris Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch
    My students and I devise new algorithms to improve the imaging of reflection seismic data. Images obtained from seismic data are the main source of information on the structural and stratigraphic complexities in Earth's subsurface. These images are constructed by processing seismic wavefields recorded at the surface of Earth and generated by either active-source experiments (reflection data), or by far-away earthquakes (teleseismic data). The high-resolution and fidelity of 3-D reflection-seismic images enables oil companies to drill with high accuracy for hydrocarbon reservoirs that are buried under two kilometers of water and up to 15 kilometers of sediments and hard rock. To achieve this technological feat, the recorded data must be processed employing advanced mathematical algorithms that harness the power of huge computational resources. To demonstrate the advantages of our new methods, we process 3D field data on our parallel cluster running several hundreds of processors.

    Teaching
    I teach a course on seismic imaging for graduate students in geophysics and in the other departments of the School of Earth Sciences. I run a research graduate seminar every quarter of the year. This year I will be teaching a one-day short course in 30 cities around the world as the SEG/EAGE Distinguished Instructor Short Course, the most important educational outreach program of these two societies.

    Professional Activities
    2007 SEG/EAGE Distinguished Instructor Short Course (2007); co-director, Stanford Exploration Project (1998-present); founding member, Editorial Board of SIAM Journal on Imaging Sciences (2007-present); member, SEG Research Committee (1996-present); chairman, SEG/EAGE Summer Research Workshop (2006)

  • Dennis Bird

    Dennis Bird

    Professor of Geological Sciences, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsTheoretical geochemistry of reactions among aqueous solutions and minerals in magma-hydrothermal systems; environmental geochemistry of toxic metals in the Mother Lode Gold region, CA, and the emergence of life in the aftermath of the Moon-forming impact, ca. 4.4Ga.

  • Kevin Boyce

    Kevin Boyce

    Professor of Geological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPaleontology/Geobiology; Fossil record of plant physiology and development; Evolution of terrestrial ecosystems including fungi, animals, and environmental feedbacks with the biota

  • Adam Brandt

    Adam Brandt

    Associate Professor of Energy Resources Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsGreenhouse gas emissions, energy systems optimization, mathematical modeling of resource depletion, life cycle analysis

  • Gordon Brown

    Gordon Brown

    Dorrell William Kirby Professor of Geology in the School of Earth Sciences, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsSurface and interface geochemistry; environmental fate of heavy metals; nanotechnology, applications of synchrotron radiation in geochemistry and mineralogy

  • Marshall Burke

    Marshall Burke

    Associate Professor of Earth System Science and Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies

    BioMarshall Burke is an assistant professor in the Department of Earth System Science, deputy director at the Center on Food Security and the Environment, and center fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies (FSI) at Stanford University. He is also a faculty research fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research, and a co-founder of AtlasAI, a remote sensing start-up. His research focuses on social and economic impacts of environmental change and on measuring and understanding economic development in emerging markets. His work has appeared in both economic and scientific journals, including recent publications in Nature, Science, The Quarterly Journal of Economics, and The Lancet. He holds a PhD in agricultural and resource economics from the University of California, Berkeley and a BA in international relations from Stanford University.

    Prospective students should see my personal webpage, linked at right.

  • Dale Burns

    Dale Burns

    Physical Sci Res Scientist

    BioI manage the Stanford Mineral and Microchemical Analysis Facility. My primary responsibilities include developing and testing procedures for measuring major and trace element concentrations in a variety of solid materials, working with Stanford researchers (and external users) to design experiments and collect, interpret, and publish data, and overseeing the long-term development and trajectory of the Mineral and Microchemical Analysis Facility both within the Stanford School of Earth, Energy, and Environmental Sciences and in the greater Stanford community.

  • Jef Caers

    Jef Caers

    Professor of Geological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research focuses on the exploration & exploitation of geological resources, from data acquisition to decision making under uncertainty and risk assessment.

  • Page Chamberlain

    Page Chamberlain

    Professor of Geological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch
    I use stable and radiogenic isotopes to understand Earth system history. These studies examine the link between climate, tectonics, biological, and surface processes. Projects include: 1) examining the terrestrial climate history of the Earth focusing on periods of time in the past that had CO 2-levels similar to the present and to future projections; and 2) addressing how the chemical weathering of the Earth's crust affects both the long- and short-term carbon cycle. Field areas for these studies are in the Cascades, Rocky Mountains, Sierra Nevada, the European Alps, Tibet and the Himalaya and the Southern Alps of New Zealand.

    International Collaborations
    Much of the research that I do has an international component. Specifically, I have collaborations with: 1) the Senckenberg Biodiversity and Climate Research Center in Frankfurt Germany as a Humboldt Fellow and 2) the Chinese University of Geosciences in Bejiing China where I collaborate with Professor Yuan Gao.

    Teaching
    I teach courses at the undergraduate and graduate level in isotope biogeochemistry, Earth system history, and the relationship between climate, surface processes and tectonics.

    Professional Activities
    Editor American Journal of Science; Co-Director Stanford Stable Isotope Biogeochemistry Laboratory (present);Chair, Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences (2004-07); Co-Director Stanford/USGS SHRIMP Ion microprobe facility (2001-04)

  • Jon Claerbout

    Jon Claerbout

    Cecil H. and Ida M. Green Professor of Geophysics, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsReflection Seismology

  • Matthew Coble

    Matthew Coble

    Phys Sci Res Assoc, Geological Sciences

    BioFrom 2012 until 2019, I co-managed the SHRIMP-RG ion-microprobe at Stanford University. I oversaw operation of the laboratories and work closely with Stanford scientists, students, and visiting scientists to undertake measurements on the SHRIMP-RG. This includes training users in SIMS methods, assisting with sample preparation/characterization, data acquisition, reduction, interpretation, and publication of results. I also contribute to the development and refinement of new techniques and standard development efforts on the SHRIMP-RG.

    My research focuses on understanding the timescales of magmatic processes and the sources of crystal diversity in magmatic systems. To accomplish this, I use radiometric dating (238U-230Th, 238U-206Pb, 40Ar-39Ar, and U-Th/He) and chemical analysis of minerals to investigate the temporal and compositional history of magmas. I integrate these results to better understand how magmas evolved in the crust leading up to eruption, and the geology of these deposits exposed on Earth’s surface today. The methods I utilize involve electron microprobe (EMP), secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), nanoSIMS, and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS).

    One of the exciting and challenging components of my research is finding analytical techniques to answer complicated petrogenetic questions. To do this, one of the main tools I employ is the high spatial resolution of SIMS in order to measure trace elements and isotopic ages simultaneously, often in-situ, from the same analyte volume (~4 ng). Additionally, using the relatively slow sputter rate of the SIMS method (10’s of nm/min), I have applied this approach to depth profiling into fresh, unpolished mineral surfaces to target the last phase of mineral growth. This have been extremely useful for dating zircons with complicated histories. For example, I have been working on radiometrically dating geologically young volcanic zircons (Quaternary in age) where the outermost micron of grain yields crystallization ages that agree with Ar-Ar and U-Th/He eruption ages, whereas the interiors contain older inherited portions of the grains. Another example is applying this technique to dating thing (<2 micron) metaphoric rims surround an older protolith core, which would be impossible to analyze using traditional techniques of polishing zircon to expose the interiors of the grains.

    Please visit https://shrimprg.stanford.edu/ for more information about the SHRIMP-RG and SIMS.

    I have recently moved to Wellington, New Zealand. However, I remain actively involved in numerous on-gong projects at Stanford University and in the SHRIMP- RG lab as a consulting scientist. Please contact me using my stanford.edu or gmail accounts if you have question about previous or ongoing research projects.

  • David Danielson

    David Danielson

    Adjunct Professor

    BioDavid T. Danielson became a Precourt energy scholar at Stanford in 2016. With Stuart Macmillan and Joel Moxley, Dave co-teaches the yearlong course "Energy Transformation Collaborative." This project-based course provides a launchpad for the creation and development of transformational energy ventures. Interdisciplinary student teams research, analyze and refine detailed plans for high-impact opportunities in the context of the new energy venture development framework offered in this course.

    Since January 2017, Dave has been managing director of Breakthrough Energy Ventures, a $1 billion fund focused on fighting climate change by investing in clean energy innovation.

    From 2012 to 2016, Dave was assistant secretary of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy. There, he directed the U.S. government’s innovation strategy in the areas of sustainable transportation, renewable power, energy efficiency and clean-energy manufacturing, investing about $2 billion annually into American clean-energy innovation. He is considered a global expert in the development of next generation clean-energy technologies and the creation of new R&D and organizational models for high-impact clean energy innovation.

    Prior to being appointed by President Obama as assistant secretary, Dave was the first hire at DOE’s Advanced Research Projects Agency– Energy (ARPA-E), a funding agency that focuses on the development of high-risk, high-reward clean-energy technologies. Prior to his government service, he was a clean-energy venture capitalist and, as a PhD student at MIT, was the founder and president of the MIT Energy Club.

  • Anne Dekas

    Anne Dekas

    Assistant Professor of Earth System Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsEnvironmental microbiology, deep-sea microbial ecology, marine biogeochemistry

  • Noah Diffenbaugh

    Noah Diffenbaugh

    Kara J. Foundation Professor and Kimmelman Family Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Noah S. Diffenbaugh is an Editor of the peer-review journal Geophysical Research Letters, and a Lead Author for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). He is a recipient of the James R. Holton Award from the American Geophysical Union, a CAREER award from the National Science Foundation, and a Terman Fellowship from Stanford University. He has also been recognized as a Kavli Fellow by the U.S. National Academy of Sciences, and as a Google Science Communication Fellow.

  • Sibyl Diver

    Sibyl Diver

    Social Science Research Scholar

    BioSibyl Diver is a research scientist at Stanford University in the Department of Earth System Science. She does community-engaged research on Indigenous water governance focusing on Pacific Northwest salmon watersheds. This includes research on co-management (or collaborative management) arrangements between Indigenous communities and state agencies. She received her PhD from Berkeley's Department of Environmental Science, Policy and Management at the College of Natural Resources. Sibyl completed her undergraduate work at Stanford, earning a dual degree in Human Biology and Russian. Prior to graduate school, Sibyl spent eight years with the non-profit Pacific Environment, supporting Russian grassroots environmental and indigenous leaders to have a voice in natural resource management decisions. Sibyl is a member of the Karuk-UC Berkeley Collaborative, a group supporting the Karuk Tribe's eco-cultural revitalization strategy in Northern California.

    For publications and CV, please see www.sibyldiver.com.

  • Rob Dunbar

    Rob Dunbar

    W.M. Keck Professor in the School of Earth Sciences and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOcean processes, biogeochemistry, climatology/paleoclimatology, isotopic chemistry, ocean policy

  • Robyn Dunbar

    Robyn Dunbar

    Lecturer
    Associate Dean for Educational Affairs, School of Earth, Energy and Environmental Sciences

    BioRobyn leads the Educational Initiatives team in the Office of the Dean, with a particular focus on supporting school-wide efforts and department/program educational partnerships. After joining Stanford’s Center for Teaching and Learning (CTL) in 1999 as Assistant Director for Science and Engineering, Robyn went on to become Associate Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education and CTL's Director in 2013, a position that she held prior to joining the new Office of the Vice Provost for Teaching and Learning (VPTL) in 2014. During her time at VPTL, Robyn led teams in faculty and graduate student teaching development, as well as evaluation and research.

    Robyn received a B.A. in geology from Trinity University followed by an M.A. in Antarctic marine geology and Ph.D. in geology from Rice University. During the course of her graduate work, Robyn participated in five Antarctic research cruises and holds the distinction of being one of the first two women to conduct Antarctic marine research aboard a U.S. Coast Guard icebreaker. By the time she received her Ph.D., Robyn’s research, her career, and her soul had shifted to the ancient rock record and the spectacular geology of the Four Corners area. Robyn was a faculty member in geology at the University of New Mexico and at Rice University before coming to Stanford.

    On the personal side of things, Robyn enjoys time with her husband (and Stanford professor) Rob Dunbar, her two wonderful sons, and way too many long-haired dogs and cats. Along with Rob, she has participated in numerous Stanford Travel Study trips to exotic destinations and enjoys the mesa country, gardening, and turning over rocks.

  • Eric Dunham

    Eric Dunham

    Associate Professor of Geophysics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPhysics of natural hazards, specifically earthquakes, tsunamis, and volcanoes. Computational geophysics.

  • Louis Durlofsky

    Louis Durlofsky

    Otto N. Miller Professor in Earth Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsGeneral reservoir simulation, optimization, reduced-order modeling, upscaling, flow in fractured systems, history matching, CO2 sequestration, energy systems optimization

  • Marco Einaudi

    Marco Einaudi

    Welton Joseph and Maud L'Anphere Crook Professor of Applied Earth Sciences, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOre deposits and exploration; geology and geochemistry of hydrothermal mineral deposits

  • William Ellsworth

    William Ellsworth

    Professor (Research) of Geophysics

    BioMy research interests can be broadly defined as the study of active faults, the earthquakes they generate and the physics of the earthquake source. A major objective of my work is to improve our knowledge of earthquake hazards through the application of physics-based understanding of the underlying processes. As Co-Director of the Stanford Center for Induced and Triggered Seismicity, my students, postdocs and I conduct multi-disciplinary studies into the causes and consequences of anthropogenic earthquakes in a wide variety of settings. I have also long been committed to earthquake risk reduction, specifically through the transfer of scientific understanding of the hazard to people, businesses, policymakers and government agencies. Before coming to Stanford in 2015, I was a research geophysicist at the U. S. Geological Survey in Menlo Park, California for more than 40 years where I focused on problems of seismicity, seismotectonics, probabilistic earthquake forecasting, and earthquake source processes

  • W Gary Ernst

    W Gary Ernst

    The Benjamin M. Page Professor in Earth Sciences, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPetrology/geochemistry and plate tectonics of Circumpacific and Alpine mobile belts; ultrahigh-pressure metamorphism in Eurasia; geology of the California Coast Ranges, the cental Klamath Mountains, and White-Inyo Range; geobotany and remote sensing of the American Southwest; mineralogy and human health.

  • Rodney Ewing

    Rodney Ewing

    Frank Stanton Professor in Nuclear Security, Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies and at the Precourt Institute for Energy

    BioRod Ewing is the Frank Stanton Professor in Nuclear Security in the Center for International Security and Cooperation in the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies and a Professor in the Department of Geological Sciences in the School of Earth, Energy and Environmental Sciences at Stanford University. He is the Edward H. Kraus Distinguished University Professor Emeritus at the University of Michigan, where he was in three Departments: Earth & Environmental Sciences, Nuclear Engineering & Radiological Sciences, and Materials Science and Engineering. He is also a Regents' Emeritus Professor at the University of New Mexico.

    Ewing received a B.S. degree in geology from Texas Christian University (1968, summa cum laude) and M.S. (l972) and Ph.D. (l974, with distinction) degrees from Stanford University where he held an NSF Fellowship. His graduate studies focused on an esoteric group of minerals, metamict Nb-Ta-Ti oxides, which are unusual because they have become amorphous due to radiation damage caused by the presence of radioactive elements. Over the past forty years, the early study of these unusual minerals has blossomed into a broadly based research program on radiation effects in complex ceramic materials. This has led to the development of techniques to predict the long-term behavior of materials, such as those used in radioactive waste disposal. He is the author or co-author of over 750 research publications and the editor or co-editor of 18 monographs, proceedings volumes or special issues of journals. He has published widely in mineralogy, geochemistry, materials science, nuclear materials, physics and chemistry in over 100 different ISI journals. He has been granted a patent for the development of a highly durable material for the immobilization of excess weapons plutonium.

    Ewing has received the Hawley Medal of the Mineralogical Association of Canada in 1997 and 2002, a Guggenheim Fellowship in 2002, the Dana Medal of the Mineralogical Society of America in 2006, the Lomonosov Gold Medal of the Russian Academy of Sciences in 2006, a Honorary Doctorate from the Université Pierre et Marie Curie in 2007, Roebling Medal of the Mineralogical Society of America, and is a foreign Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada. He is also a fellow of the Geological Society of America, Mineralogical Society of America, American Geophysical Union, Geochemical Society and the European Association of Geochemistry, American Ceramic Society, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, Mineralogical Society of Great Britain and Ireland, and the Materials Research Society. He was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 2017.

    He has been president of the Mineralogical Society of America (2002) and the International Union of Materials Research Societies (1997-1998). Ewing has served on the Board of Directors of the Geochemical Society (2012-2015) and the Board of Governors of the Gemological Institute of America (2006-2015). He is a member of the Science and Security Board of the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists and on the Editorial Board of Applied Physics Reviews . He is a founding Editor of the magazine Elements, which is now supported by 17 earth science societies, and a Founding Executive Editor of Geochemical Perspective Letters. He is a member of the Board of Earth Sciences and Resources of the National Academy of Science, Engineering and Medicine (2017-2020).

    Professor Ewing is co-editor of and a contributing author of Radioactive Waste Forms for the Future (North-Holland Physics, Amsterdam, 1988) and Uncertainty Underground – Yucca Mountain and the Nation’s High-Level Nuclear Waste (MIT Press, 2006). He has served on eleven National Research Council committees for the National Academy of Sciences that have reviewed issues related to nuclear waste and nuclear weapons. He was appointed by President Obama to Chair the Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board (2012-2017).

  • Chris Field

    Chris Field

    Melvin and Joan Lane Professor for Interdisciplinary Environmental Studies, Director, Woods Institute for the Environment, Professor of Earth System Science, of Biology and Senior Fellow at the Precourt Institute for Energy

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch
    My field is climate-change science, and my research emphasizes human-ecological interactions across many disciplines. Most studies include aspects of ecology, but also aspects of law, sociology, medicine, or engineering.

  • Christopher Francis

    Christopher Francis

    Professor of Earth System Science and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMicrobial cycling of carbon, nitrogen, and metals in the environment; molecular geomicrobiology; marine microbiology; microbial diversity; meta-omics

  • Margot Gerritsen

    Margot Gerritsen

    Senior Associate Dean for Educational Affairs, Professor of Energy Resources Engineering, Senior Fellow at the Precourt Institute for Energy and Professor, by courtesy, of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch
    My work is about understanding and simulating complicated fluid flow problems. My research focuses on the design of highly accurate and efficient parallel computational methods to predict the performance of enhanced oil recovery methods. I'm particularly interested in gas injection and in-situ combustion processes. These recovery methods are extremely challenging to simulate because of the very strong nonlinearities in the governing equations. Outside petroleum engineering, I'm active in coastal ocean simulation with colleagues from the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, yacht research and pterosaur flight mechanics with colleagues from the Department of Mechanical and Aeronautical Engineering, and the design of search algorithms in collaboration with the Library of Congress and colleagues from the Institute of Computational and Mathematical Engineering.

    Teaching
    I teach courses in both energy related topics (reservoir simulation, energy, and the environment) in my department, and mathematics for engineers through the Institute of Computational and Mathematical Engineering (ICME). I also initiated two courses in professional development in our department (presentation skills and teaching assistant training), and a consulting course for graduate students in ICME, which offers expertise in computational methods to the Stanford community and selected industries.

    Professional Activities
    Senior Associate Dean, School of Earth, Energy and Environmental Sciences, Stanford (from 2015); Director, Institute for Computational and Mathematical Engineering, Stanford (from 2010); Stanford Fellow (2010-2012); Magne Espedal Professor II, Bergen University (2011-2014); Aldo Leopold Fellow (2009); Chair, SIAM Activity group in Geosciences (2007, present, reelected in 2009); Faculty Research Fellow, Clayman Institute (2008); Elected to Council of Society of Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM) (2007); organizing committee, 2008 Gordon Conference on Flow in Porous Media; producer, Smart Energy podcast channel; Director, Stanford Yacht Research; Co-director and founder, Stanford Center of Excellence for Computational Algorithms in Digital Stewardship; Editor, Journal of Small Craft Technology; Associate editor, Transport in Porous Media; Reviewer for various journals and organizations including SPE, DoE, NSF, Journal of Computational Physics, Journal of Scientific Computing, Transport in Porous Media, Computational Geosciences; member, SIAM, SPE, KIVI, AGU, and APS

  • Steven Gorelick

    Steven Gorelick

    Cyrus Fisher Tolman Professor in the School of Earth Sciences and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch
    As a hydrogeologist, my research involves the study of water resources and water security with emphasis on groundwater. Using lab and field data, our aim is to develop an understanding of fundamental aspects of the transport of water and contaminants, and to investigate regional water resources systems. We have developed simulation-based planning tools to aid in sustainable agricultural and urban water management in the US, Mexico, India, and Jordan. With my colleagues, we have initiated the Global Freshwater Initiative, which studies water resources vulnerability problems throughout the world. During the past 14 years, our field investigations have focused on the interactions between groundwater and patterns of vegetation in studies of both meadow and salt-marsh ecohydrology. Scales of physical processes of interest extend from the domain of small pores to vast regional subsurface flow environments. Although driven by observations and data, we develop conceptual and quantitative models to rigorously understand physical processes, make predictions, and explore the impacts of new water management policies, such as taxes, quota, and markets. Such models enhance our understanding of groundwater flow behavior and provide the means to better manage water resources.

    Teaching
    I teach courses for graduate and undergraduate students involving principles and methods used in physical and contaminant hydrogeology. In addition, I run a seminar series that exposes students to a variety of multidisciplinary topics involving hydrology.

    Professional Activities
    2016 Fellow, American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), 2014 Best Paper in Environmental Research Letters in 2014 (Padowski and Gorelick, (2014), 2013 Editor's Choice Award, Water Resources Research for paper Srinivasan et al., (2012), Member, US National Academy of Engineering (2012), International Fellow, Institute for Environmental Science and Research (ESR) (2011), New Zealand, Fulbright Senior Scholar (2008-09); Chester C. Keisel Memorial Lecturer, University of Arizona (2008); Best Paper Award in Computers and Geosciences, International Association for Mathematical Geology (2006); fellow, John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation (2005); Stanford representative to the Consortium of Universities for Advancement of Hydrologic Sciences (2005-2008); M. King Hubbert Science Award, NGWA (2004); Ineson Distinguished Lecturer (1998); Fulbright Senior Scholar (1997); O.E. Meinzer Award, GSA (1994) James B. Macelwane medal, AGU (1990); Fellow, GSA (1988) and AGU (1990); Editorial Board, Optimization and Engineering Journal (1990-present); visiting professor, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Ecological Engineering Laboratory (2006); visiting professor, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, jointly at the Swiss Federal Institute for Environmental Science and Technology (2005); visiting scholar, University of Cambridge, Zoology (2007); visiting scientist, CSIRO, Perth, Australia (2009); Member AGU Water and Society Technical Committee (2011-present) visiting professor, University of Western Australia Centre for Ecohydrology (2012); visiting professor, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology ETH Zurich (2013, 2019), Fulbright Distinguished Chair in Science, Technology and Innovation, Australian-American Program (2019-2020).

  • Martin Grove

    Martin Grove

    Professor (Research) of Geological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch
    I study the evolution of the Earth's crust by undertaking petrologic and geochemically-based research that is grounded with fieldwork. I co-direct the Stanford-USGS ion probe laboratory and develop geochronologic methods to constrain crystallization, metamorphic, and metasomatic histories of the middle to deep crust. Similarly, because heat flow characteristically attends mass transfer during crustal deformation, I employ 40Ar/39Ar and (U-Th)/He thermochronology to extract thermal history information from minerals to constrain the timing and magnitude of fault slip as well as erosional and tectonic denudation. Finally, I am heavily involved in provenance studies to constrain aspects of crustal deformation and erosion that are only preserved in the sedimentary record.

  • Lucia Gualtieri

    Lucia Gualtieri

    Assistant Professor of Geophysics

    BioLucia Gualtieri is an Assistant Professor of Geophysics at Stanford University. Before joining Stanford, she was a Postdoctoral Research Associate in the Department of Geosciences at Princeton University and a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University. Lucia earned her Ph.D. in Geophysics in 2014, as a dual degree from the Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris (France) and the University of Bologna (Italy). She obtained her M.Sc. in Geophysics in 2010 and her B.Sc. in Physics in 2008, both at the University of Bologna. Lucia is interested in a variety of research topics, and in tackling them under a theoretical, computational and observational point of view. Lucia’s main research interests are in solving problems related to emerging fields in seismology, like ambient seismic noise and seismic signals due to mass-wasting events. She is also interested in using seismic waves to scan the interior of our planet and in gaining insights on how the Earth's structure affects seismic records.

  • Elizabeth Hadly

    Elizabeth Hadly

    Paul S. and Billie Achilles Professor in Environmental Biology, Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment and Professor, by courtesy, of Geological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsElizabeth Hadly and her lab probe how perturbations such as climatic change and human modification of the environment influence the evolution and ecology of animals.

  • Jerry Harris

    Jerry Harris

    The Cecil H. and Ida M. Green Professor in Geophysics, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsBiographical Information
    Jerry M. Harris is the Cecil and Ida Green Professor of Geophysics and Associate Dean for the Office of Multicultural Affairs. He joined Stanford in 1988 following 11 years in private industry. He served five years as Geophysics department chair, was the Founding Director of the Stanford Center for Computational Earth and Environmental Science (CEES), and co-launched Stanford's Global Climate and Energy Project (GCEP). Graduates from Jerry's research group, the Stanford Wave Physics Lab, work in private industry, government labs, and universities.

    Research
    My research interests address the physics and dynamics of seismic and electromagnetic waves in complex media. My approach to these problems includes theory, numerical simulation, laboratory methods, and the analysis of field data. My group, collectively known as the Stanford Wave Physics Laboratory, specializes on high frequency borehole methods and low frequency labratory methods. We apply this research to the characterization and monitoring of petroleum and CO2 storage reservoirs.

    Teaching
    I teach courses on waves phenomena for borehole geophysics and tomography. I recently introduced and co-taught a new course on computational geosciences.

    Professional Activities
    I was the First Vice President of the Society of Exploration Geophysicists in 2003-04, and have served as the Distinguished Lecturer for the SPE, SEG, and AAPG.

  • Thomas Hayden

    Thomas Hayden

    Professor of the Practice, Earth Systems Program

    BioThomas Hayden is Director of the Master of Arts in Earth Systems, Environmental Communication Program at Stanford University. He teaches science and environmental communication and journalism in Stanford's School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences and Graduate Program in Journalism. He came to Stanford in 2008, following a career of reporting and writing about science and environmental issues for national and international publications.

    Hayden’s journalism career began at Newsweek magazine in New York, where he was an American Association for the Advancement of Science Mass Media fellow in 1997. In 2000, he moved to US News & World Report in Washington, DC, where he covered science, the environment, medicine, culture and breaking news as a senior writer. Since 2005, Hayden has been a freelance journalist. His cover stories have appeared in publications including Wired, Smithsonian, National Geographic, Washington Post Book World and many others. He has reported from South America, Europe, and Asia; and North America from New Orleans to the Canadian Arctic.

    Hayden is coauthor of two books. He wrote the 2007 national bestseller On Call in Hell, about battlefield medicine in Iraq, with Navy doctor Richard Jadick. In 2008 he collaborated on the critically acclaimed Sex and War, about the biological evolution and cultural development of warfare through human history, with Malcolm Potts of the University of California, Berkeley. He was the lead writer on the 2010 9th revision of the iconic National Geographic Atlas of the World. And he was coeditor of and a contributor to The Science Writers' Handbook: Everything You Need to Know to Pitch, Publish and Prosper in the Digital Age, published in 2013.

    In 2005, Hayden taught science writing in The Writing Workshops at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore with his wife and fellow science journalist, Erika Check Hayden. He was a founding faculty member in the annual Banff Centre Science Communications workshop, where he taught from 2006 until 2010, and was involved as a speaker and trainer with the Leopold Leadership Program for environmental scientists from 2000 to 2013.

    Hayden graduated from his hometown school, the University of Saskatchewan, with a Bachelor of Science in Agriculture (honours) degree in applied microbiology and food science, and received an MS degree in marine biology from the University of Southern California. He completed five years of doctoral study in biological oceanography at USC, before leaving science for journalism with A.B.D. status. He spent more than nine months at sea cumulatively over five years, conducting oceanographic research from Southern California to San Francisco Bay, and from Antarctica to Easter Island.

    In 2015, Hayden helped launch a new graduate degree program in Stanford's School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences. The Master of Arts in Earth Systems, Environmental Communication degree is focussed on the study and practice of effective, engaging, accurate communication of complex environmental and Earth systems information to nonspecialist audiences.

  • George Hilley

    George Hilley

    Professor of Geological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsActive tectonics, quantitative structural geology and geomorphology; Geographic Information Systems;unsaturated zone gas transport; landscape development;active deformation and mountain belt growth in central Asia, central Andes, and along the San Andreas Fault; integrated investigation of earthquake hazards.

  • Sara H. Hoagland

    Sara H. Hoagland

    Lecturer

    BioSara (Suki) Hoagland is a Lecturer in the Earth Systems Program of the School of Earth, Energy and Environmental Sciences. She directs the required internship program and team-teaches and mentors the “Senior Reflection and Capstone” series. She also teaches the Master's Seminar and the E-IPER Environmental Design and Research Seminar. Recently she also team taught “Gender, Land Rights and Climate Change”. Previously, she was the first Executive Director of Stanford University's Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in Environment and Resources, (now E-IPER). She was a Senior Lecturer in that program and in the Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment. She designed and taught courses for E-IPER such as Case Studies in Environmental Problem Solving, Global Environmental Ethics, and Sustainable Development in Costa Rica, which included a field seminar there. She also served as the faculty advisor to the Stanford Farm and the Stanford chapter of Engineers for a Sustainable World.

    From 1989 to 2000, Dr. Hoagland was Assistant Professor at the School of International Service at American University where she created the International Environment and Development Semester, which included three-week field practicums to East Africa and Central America. Dr. Hoagland was also the Director and Clinical Associate Professor for the Masters in Development Practice Program at the Josef Korbel School of International Studies at the University of Denver, where she also serves on the Board of Directors. She earned her BA in government from Wesleyan University, her MA in International Relations and Curriculum Development from the University of Denver, and her PhD in International Relations from American University.

  • Roland Horne

    Roland Horne

    Thomas Davies Barrow Professor in the School of Earth Sciences and Senior Fellow at the Precourt Institute for Energy

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWell Testing, Optimisation and Geothermal Reservoir Engineering

  • James Ingle

    James Ingle

    The W. M. Keck Professor of Earth Sciences, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCurrent research interests include the Neogene stratigraphy, paleoceanography, and depositional history of marine basins and continental margins of the Pacific Ocean with a focus on the California borderland and Gulf of California. Other interests involve study of marine diatomaceous sediments, the sedimentary record of the oxygen minimum zone, and application of benthic and planktonic foraminifera to questions surrounding the history of the global ocean and climate change.

  • Rob Jackson

    Rob Jackson

    Michelle and Kevin Douglas Provostial Professor and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment and at the Precourt Institute for Energy

    BioRob Jackson and his lab examine the many ways people affect the Earth. They seek basic scientific knowledge and use it to help shape policies and reduce the environmental footprint of global warming, energy extraction, and other issues. They're currently examining the effects of climate change and droughts on forest mortality and grassland ecosystems. They are also working to measure and reduce greenhouse gas emissions through the Global Carbon Project (globalcarbonproject.org), which Jackson chairs; examples of new research Rob leads include establishing a global network of methane tower measurements at more than 80 sites worldwide and measuring and reducing methane emissions from oil and gas wells, city streets, and homes and buildings.

    As an author and photographer, Rob has published a trade book about the environment (The Earth Remains Forever, University of Texas Press), two books of children’s poems, Animal Mischief and Weekend Mischief (Highlights Magazine and Boyds Mills Press), and recent or forthcoming poems in the journals Southwest Review, Cortland Review, Cold Mountain Review, Atlanta Review, LitHub, and more. His photographs have appeared in many media outlets, including the NY Times, Washington Post, USA Today, US News and World Report, Science, Nature, and National Geographic News.

    Rob is a current Guggenheim Fellow and sabbatical visitor in the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences. He is also a Fellow in the American Association for the Advancement of Science, American Geophysical Union, and Ecological Society of America. He received a Presidential Early Career Award in Science and Engineering from the National Science Foundation, awarded at the White House.

  • James Holland Jones

    James Holland Jones

    Associate Professor of Earth System Science and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI am a biological anthropologist with primary research interests in evolutionary demography and life history theory. In addition these fundamental interests in the evolution of human life histories, I work at the intersection of disease ecology, the analysis of dynamical systems, and social network analysis. My work combines the formalisms of population biology, statistics, and social network analysis to address fundamental problems in biodemography, epidemiology, and human decision-making in variable environments.

  • Andre Journel

    Andre Journel

    The Donald and Donald M. Steel Professor of Earth Sciences, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsNon-parametric, non-Gaussian Geostatistics, Stochastic Simulation, Training image-based simulation

  • Julie Kennedy

    Julie Kennedy

    Professor (Teaching) of Earth System Science, Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch
    For the past 21 years I have been active in designing and running the school's interdisciplinary environmental science and policy undergraduate major, the Earth Systems Program. I have specific interest in interdisciplinary teaching and learning, and in the effective communication of complex interdisciplinary problem descriptions, analysis methods, and solutions to expert and non-expert audiences. I advise and work on research projects with undergraduate and master's level students whose interests include ecology, energy, land systems management, ocean science and policy, sustainability, environmental education, and science communication.

    Teaching
    I teach classes in interdisciplinary problem analysis and in critical reading and review of environmental literature. I also am one of a number of faculty who co-teach the Earth Systems gateway course, Introduction to Earth Systems.

    Professional Activities
    My professional activities center on undergraduate education. I have been active for decades on Stanford committees that examine standards and policies, the review of general education requirements, undergraduate advising programs, student mental health, and student diversity.

  • Tae Wook Kim

    Tae Wook Kim

    Sr Res Scientist-Physical

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch Field:
    Synthesis & characterization of thin inorganic/polymer membranes, adsorbents, and conductive
    membranes; Characterization of well-core & heavy oil; CO2 separation & sequestration process; Enhanced oil recovery method for offshore oil field; fuel cells system & hydrogen production.

  • Simon Klemperer

    Simon Klemperer

    Professor of Geophysics and, by courtesy, of Geological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI study the growth, tectonic evolution, and deformation of the continents. My research group undertakes field experiments in exemplary areas such as, currently, the Tibet plateau (formed by collision between Indian and Asia); the actively extending Basin-&-Range province of western North America (the Ruby Range Metamorphic Core Complex, NV, and the leaky transform beneath the Salton Trough, CA). We use active and passive seismic methods, electromagnetic recording, and all other available data!

  • Alexandra Konings

    Alexandra Konings

    Assistant Professor of Earth System Science, Center Fellow, by courtesy, at the Woods Institute for the Environment and Assistant Professor, by courtesy, of Geophysics

    BioAlexandra Konings is a ecohydrologist - she is interested in how ecosystems and the carbon cycle respond to variations in water availability at large scales (and vice versa). Research questions in the Konings lab span a range of ecosystem properties, but many of them surround the role of vegetation water content in predicting plant health and its associated fluxes and growth. She holds SB and PhD degrees from MIT (working with Dara Entekhabi), and a M.S. from Duke University (working with Gaby Katul). She joined the Department of Earth System Science as an assistant professor in 2016 after two short postdoctoral stints at Columbia University (working with Pierre Gentine) and the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (working with Dave Schimel, Sassan Saatchi, and others).

  • Robert Kovach

    Robert Kovach

    Professor of Geophysics, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsEarthquake seismology, natural hazards, and ancient earthquakes and archaeology

  • Anthony Kovscek

    Anthony Kovscek

    Keleen and Carlton Beal Professor of Petroleum Engineering and Senior Fellow at the Precourt Institute for Energy

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch
    I am interested in the recovery of unconventional hydrocarbon resources and mitigating carbon emissions from fossil fuels via geological sequestration of greenhouse gases. My research group and I examine the physics of flow through porous media at length scales that vary from the pore to the laboratory to the reservoir. The organizing themes are flow imaging to delineate the mechanisms of multiphase flow (oil, water, and gas) in porous media and the synthesis of models from experimental, theoretical, and field data. In all of our work, physical observations, obtained mainly from laboratory and field measurements, are interwoven with theory.

    Teaching
    My teaching interests center broadly around education of students to meet the energy challenges that we will face this century. I teach undergraduate courses that examine the interplay of energy use and environmental issues including renewable energy resources and sustainability. At the graduate level, I offer classes on enhanced oil recovery and the thermodynamics of hydrocarbon mixtures.

    Professional Activities
    Member, American Geophysical Union (2006); Editorial Board, SPE Reservoir Evaluation and Engineering (2006-present); Society of Petroleum Engineers (SPE) Distinguished Achievement Award for Petroleum Engineering Faculty (2006); School of Earth Sciences Award for Excellence in Teaching (1998); Earth Systems Program Executive Committee (2002-present); Woods Institute for Environment Energy Committee (2005-present); SPE Continuing Education Committee (2000-present, chair 2004-05); steering committee chair, SPE Forum, Enhanced Oil Recovery: What's Next? (2005-06); Editorial Board of the Journal of Petroleum Technology (2004-present) and SPE Reservoir Engineering and Evaluation (2006-present); member, Society of Petroleum Engineers, American Geophysical Union, and the American Chemical Society.

  • Eric Lambin

    Eric Lambin

    George and Setsuko Ishiyama Provostial Professor and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI study human-environment interactions in land systems by linking remote sensing, GIS and socio-economic data. I aim at better understanding causes and impacts of changes in tropical forests, drylands, and farming systems. I currently focus on land use transitions – i.e., the shift from deforestation (or land degradation) to reforestation (or land sparing for nature), – the influence of globalization on land use decisions, and the interactions between public and private governance of land use.

  • Mathieu Lapôtre

    Mathieu Lapôtre

    Assistant Professor of Geological Sciences

    BioProf. Lapôtre leads the Earth & Planetary Surface Processes group. His research focuses on the physics behind sedimentary and geomorphic processes that shape planetary surfaces (including Earth's), and aims to untangle what landforms and rocks tell us about the past hydrology, climate, and habitability of planets.

  • James Leckie

    James Leckie

    C.L. Peck, Class of 1906 Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor, by courtesy, of Geological Sciences

    BioLeckie investigates chemical pollutant behavior in natural aquatic systems and engineered processes, specifically the environmental aspects of surface and colloid chemistry and the geochemistry of trace elements. New research efforts are focused on the development of techniques and models for assessment of exposure of humans to toxic chemicals. Specific attention has been paid to the evaluation of exposure of young children to toxic chemicals. Other interests include technology transfer and the development of environmental science programs in developing nations.

  • Andrew Leslie

    Andrew Leslie

    Assistant Professor of Geological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI am interested in morphological evolution. I approach this broad topic by investigating how interactions among form, function, and environment have influenced evolutionary patterns in plant reproductive structures over million-year time scales. This approach requires synthesizing information from different disciplines, and my work uses approaches from paleontology, biomechanics, phylogenetics, and biogeography.

  • Juhn Liou

    Juhn Liou

    Professor of Geological and Environmental Sciences, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPetrochemical processes and tectonics of ultrahigh-pressure metamorphic terranes

  • Keith Loague

    Keith Loague

    Professor of Geological Sciences, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCURRENT RESEARCH AND SCHOLARLY INTERESTS

    RESEARCH (see PUBLICATIONS)
    Process-based characterization of hydrologic response based upon field observation and numerical simulation.
    Group Members (with degrees earned): John Griggs PhD, Jennifer Kleveno MS, Robert Miyahira MS, Ephraim Leon-Guerrero MS, Robert Abrams MS, Ricardo Diaz-Diaz Post Doctoral Fellow, Erik Wahlstrom MS, Robert Abrams PhD, Robert Abrams Post Doctoral Fellow, Jim Blanke MS CoTerm, Anona Dutton MS CoTerm, D’Artagnan Lloyd MS, Melissa Mills MS, Edzer Pebesma Visiting Scholar, Iris Stewart PhD, Luis Ugalde MS, Joel VanderKwaak Post Doctoral Fellow, Dennis Corwin Visiting Scholar, Leigh Soutter PhD, Robert Abrams Research Associate, Qihua Ran MS, Lauren Benson MS CoTerm, Qihua Ran PhD, Adrianne Carr PhD, Christopher Heppner PhD, Susan BeVille MS CoTerm, Brian Ebel PhD, Brian Ebel Post Doctoral Fellow, Benjamin Mirus PhD, Mollie Pettit MS, Kristin Mayer MS, Matthew Thomas PhD, & Matthew Thomas Post Doctoral Fellow

    TEACHING (courses taught, many times each)
    Leland Stanford Junior University (8,431 days): GES-43Q Environmental Problems, GES-130 Environmental Earth Sciences I, GES-131 Environmental Earth Sciences II, GES-130 Soil Physics and Hydrology, GES-131 Hydrologically-Driven Landscape Evolution, GES-140 Geomorphology, GES-230 Hydrogeology, GES-332b Seminar in Hydrogeology, GES-237 Surface and Near-Surface Hydrologic Response, GES-238 Soil Physics, & GES-239 Advanced Geomorphology
    University of California, Berkeley (2,222 days): FRM109 Wildland Hydrology, SS150 Soil Hydrology, SS250 Vadose Zone Modeling, & SS251 Hillslope Hydrology
    University of Hawaii, Manoa (~ 1,000 days): GG455 Groundwater Geology, GG654 Groundwater Contamination, GG655 Groundwater Modeling, & GG656 Transport Modeling

    SERVICE (US Army - 1,096 days active duty, enlisted)
    Vietnam (volunteer): Vien Long Army Airfield, Can Tho Army Airfield, & Bien Hoa Air Base (Army side); "611th Delta Riggers" (crew chief, door gunner, rigger)
    Stateside: Fort Knox, Fort Eustis, Hunter Army Airfield, Fort Carson, & Fort Benning

  • David Lobell

    David Lobell

    Professor of Earth System Science and Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute, at the Woods Institute for the Environment and at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe study the interactions between food production, food security, and the environment using a range of modern tools.

  • Donald Lowe

    Donald Lowe

    Max Steineke Professor in Earth Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsClastic sedimentology, deep-water sedimentation mechanics and facies; Archean depositional systems and crustal development

  • Katharine (Kate) Maher

    Katharine (Kate) Maher

    Associate Professor of Earth System Science, Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment and Professor, by courtesy, of Geological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch
    Chemical reactions between fluids and minerals create the environments that are uniquely characteristic of Earth’s surface. For example, chemical weathering reactions support the growth of soils and organisms and regulate the flow of elements to the oceans. The rates of these reactions also control the release and storage of natural and human-derived contaminants. Over geologic timescales, mineral-fluid reactions have helped to maintain a mostly habitable planet. Over human timescales, these reactions will regulate our ability to use Earth’s resources, such as soils, waters, and minerals.

    My research focuses on the rates of reactions in different environments using a combination of geochemical tools, including isotope geochemistry, geochemical and hydrologic modeling, and geochronology in order to address the following themes: (1) defining the controls on mineral-fluid reactions rates in the environment (2) finding new approaches to use mineral-fluid reactions to safely store carbon dioxide in the subsurface; and (3) development of isotopic approaches to study mineral-fluid reactions in the environments of Earth’s past. To support these research themes, I have constructed a new mass spectrometer and clean lab facility capable of high precision geochemical and isotopic measurements, and teach a number of classes and short courses on reactive transport.

    Teaching
    My teaching focuses on introducing students to the questions and major challenges in low-temperature and environmental geochemistry, and the application of isotope geochemistry to environmental and geologic problems. In order to introduce incoming students to Earth surface processes, materials and geochemistry, I am also teaching a freshman seminar on forensic geoscience. At the graduate level, I offer classes on isotope geochemistry and modeling of environmental transformations and mass transfer processes (i.e., subsurface reactive transport).

  • Gail Mahood

    Gail Mahood

    Professor of Geological Sciences, Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsIgneous petrogenesis and magmatic evolution of silicic magmas and physical evolution of related volcanic centers and subjacent plutons, volcanic hazards in eastern California and western Saudi Arabia, geochronology, extension-related magmatism, geoarchaeology

  • Matthew Malkowski

    Matthew Malkowski

    Acting Assistant Professor

    BioPersonal website: www.mmalkowski.com

    Stanford Project on Deep-water Depositional Systems: www.spodds.stanford.edu

  • Wendy Mao

    Wendy Mao

    Professor of Geological Sciences and of Photon Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsUnderstanding the formation and evolution of planetary interiors; experimental mineral physics; materials in extreme environments.

  • Pamela Matson

    Pamela Matson

    Richard and Rhoda Goldman Professor in Environmental Studies, Director, Change Leadership for Sustainability and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute

    BioPAMELA MATSON is an interdisciplinary sustainability scientist, academic leader, and organizational strategist. She served as dean of Stanford University’s School of Earth, Energy and Environmental Sciences from 2002-2017, building interdisciplinary departments and educational programs focused on resources, environment and sustainability, as well as co-leading university-wide interdisciplinary initiatives. In her current role as the Goldman Professor of Environmental Studies and Senior Fellow in the Woods Institute for the Environment, she leads the graduate program on Sustainability Science and Practice. Her research addresses a range of environment and sustainability issues, including sustainability of agricultural systems, vulnerability and resilience of particular people and places to climate change, and characteristics of science that can contribute to sustainability transitions at scale.

    Dr. Matson serves as chair of the board of the World Wildlife Fund-US and as a board member of the World Wildlife Fund-International and several university advisory boards. She served on the US National Academy of Science Board on Sustainable Development and co-wrote the National Research Council’s volume Our Common Journey: A transition toward sustainability (1999); she also led the NRC committee on America’s Climate Choices: Advancing the Science of Climate Change. She was the founding chair of the National Academies Roundtable on Science and Technology for Sustainability, and founding editor for the Annual Review of Environment and Resources. She is a past President of the Ecological Society of America. Her recent publications (among around 200) include Seeds of Sustainability: Lessons from the Birthplace of the Green Revolution (2012) and Pursuing Sustainability (2016).

    Pam is an elected member of the National Academy of Science and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and is a AAAS Fellow. She received a MacArthur Foundation Award, contributed to the award of the Nobel Prize to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, among other awards and recognitions, and is an Einstein Fellow of the Chinese Academy of Sciences.

    Dr. Matson holds a Bachelor of Science degree with double majors in Biology and Literature from the University of Wisconsin (Eau Claire), a Master degree in Environmental Science and Policy from Indiana University’s School of Public and Environmental Affairs, a Doctorate in Forest Ecology from Oregon State University, and honorary doctorates from Princeton, McGill and Arizona State Universities. She spent ten years as a research scientist with NASA-Ames Research Center before moving to a professorship at the University of California Berkeley and, in 1997, to Stanford University.

  • Gerald Mavko

    Gerald Mavko

    Professor (Research) of Geophysics, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch
    I work to discover and understand the relationship between geophysical measurements and the rock and fluid properties that they sample in the Earth. My students and I have begun to understand the impact of rock type, porosity, pore fluids, temperature, and stress on seismic wave propagation and electromagnetic response. We are also working to quantify the links between geophysical measurements and the sedimentary and diagenetic processes that determine rock mineralogy and texture. Ultimately, this work allows us to better infer, from geophysical images, the composition and physical conditions at depth.

    Teaching
    I teach courses for graduate and undergraduate students on rock physics--the study of the physical properties of rocks and how they can be detected and mapped using seismic and electrical methods. This includes theory, laboratory measurements, and field data analysis. I also lead seminars in which students present and critique their ongoing research in rock physics.

    Professional Activities
    Associate chair, Department of Geophysics (2006-2008); distinguished lecturer, Society of Exploration Geophysicists (2006); honorary membership, Society of Exploration Geophysicists (2001); nominated for Reginald Fessenden Award, Society of Exploration Geophysicists (2000); School of Earth Sciences Excellence in Teaching Award (2000)

  • Tim McHargue

    Tim McHargue

    Adjunct Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe architecture of turbidite depositional systems and implications for petroleum reservoir performance through the study of 3D reflection seismic volumes, outcrops, and modern deep marine systems. Research includes rules based forward modeling, controls on architectural variation, and clastic sequence stratigraphy.

  • Michael McWilliams

    Michael McWilliams

    Professor of Geological and Environmental Sciences, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsTectonics, geochronology, thermochronology. Director, Stanford-USGS Ion Microprobe Laboratory

  • Yashar Mehmani

    Yashar Mehmani

    Physical Science Research Scientist

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI study fluid and solid mechanics in porous media at the intersection of energy, water, and the environment. The scientific focus of my research is to understand and develop capabilities to predict and control multiphase flow and mechanical deformation in porous media at the microscale and to translate such knowledge into macroscopic descriptions useful for solving engineering problems.

  • Anna Marta Michalak

    Anna Marta Michalak

    Professor (By Courtesy), Earth System Science

    BioDr. Anna M. Michalak is a faculty member in the Department of Global Ecology of the Carnegie Institution for Science and a Professor in the Department of Earth System Science. Her lab's research interests lie in understanding the cycling and emissions of greenhouse gases at the Earth surface at urban to global scales – scales directly relevant to informing climate and policy – primarily through the use of atmospheric observations that provide the clearest constraints at these critical scales. Her group is also interested in climate change impacts on freshwater and coastal water quality via influences on nutrient delivery to, and on conditions within, water bodies. Her approach is highly data-driven, with a common methodological thread being the development and application of spatiotemporal statistical data fusion methods for optimizing the use of limited in situ and remote sensing environmental data. She co-led the development of the U.S. Carbon Cycle Science Plan, is the Chair of the Integrated Carbon Observation System European Research Infrastructure Consortium Scientific Advisory Board, and is a Member of the NASA Earth Science Advisory Committee, among other appointments. She is a Leopold Environmental Leadership Fellow, and a recipient of the NSF CAREER Award and the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE), the highest honor bestowed by the U.S. government on scientists and engineers beginning their independent careers.

  • Elizabeth Miller

    Elizabeth Miller

    Professor of Geological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsStructural geology and tectonics. Evolution and deformation of continental crust and its sedimentary cover, plate tectonics and continental deformation, geochronology and thermochronology. Current interests in the Cordillera, northern circum-Pacific, Russia and Arctic regions.

  • J. Moldowan

    J. Moldowan

    Professor (Research) of Geological and Environmental Sciences, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOrganic geochemistry; study of molecular fossils (biomarkers) and their use in petroleum system analysis, reservoir characterization, environmental monitoring, molecular paleontology, global change, petroleum biodegradation in reservoir. Studies of thermal cracking of petroleum by deep burial or catalytic alteration in deep source rocks and reservoirs by using diamondoids. Applications to unconventional petroleun exploration and development.

  • Seyed Mostafa Mousavi

    Seyed Mostafa Mousavi

    Physical Science Research Scientist

    BioI am a geophysicist with an engineering background. My work includes:(1) statistical seismology (seismicity analyses, seismic hazard, and risk analyses), (2) signal processing (time-frequency analyses and denoising), (3) machine learning/deep learning (seismic signal processing and discrimination), (4) observational seismology (microseismic monitoring and induced seismicity).

  • Mr Joel Forrest Moxley

    Mr Joel Forrest Moxley

    Adjunct Professor

    BioJoel Moxley is a Precourt Energy Scholar and Adjunct Professor at Stanford University. Joel received his B.S.E in Chemical Engineering from Princeton University, and his Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering from Massachusetts Institute for Technology.

    Joel is co-founder of Foro Energy and Rho AI, and he is a founding investor and board member of Zero Mass Water, Rubicon Global, Pie Insurance, and Fervo Energy. Joel is also an angel investor in more than 30 early-stage technology companies including Biota Technology. He actively invests from a small institutional fund into pre-seed, seed, and Series A financing rounds. He is a member of the investment team of Breakthrough Energy Ventures.

  • David Mucciarone

    David Mucciarone

    Lecturer
    Lab Manager, Department of Earth System Science

    Current Role at StanfordAs a Research and Development Scientist and Engineer I take on many roles in the support of research. My role as Lab and Field Expedition Manager allows me to work closely with students, faculty, and post-docs in an effort to forward their research objectives. When at Stanford, I am responsible for the Stable Isotope Lab operation which includes the maintenance and repair of instrumentation, method development, training users, and management and synthesis of data. Field research is an important aspect of my work, I participate in field logistics and operations involving underwater, land, and vessel based research which include activities such as: coral drilling with underwater hydraulic systems, mooring deployment/recovery, water chemistry, sediment coring, deployment/recovery of underwater sensors, and perform marine/lacustrine seismic acquisition. I'm also a research scuba diver, dive master, and serve as a member on the Stanford Dive Control Board. Our research group has a 38' research vessel that I maintain and operate for our coastal/fjord and lake projects. When necessary, I design and build lab instrumentation and autonomous underwater systems for our research projects. I co-lead Bing Overseas Program Seminars in Patagonia and assist with the science diving course at Hopkins Marine Station.

  • Tapan Mukerji

    Tapan Mukerji

    Professor (Research) of Energy Resources Engineering and, by courtesy, of Geophysics and of Geological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy students and I use theoretical, computational, and statistical models, to discover and understand fundamental relations between geophysical data and subsurface properties, to quantify uncertainty in our geomodels, and to address value of information for decision making under uncertainty.

  • Rosamond Naylor

    Rosamond Naylor

    William Wrigley Professor, Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment and at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies and Professor, by courtesy, of Economics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch Activities:
    My research focuses on the environmental and equity dimensions of intensive food production systems, and the food security dimensions of low-input systems. I have been involved in a number of field-level research projects around the world and have published widely on issues related to climate impacts on agriculture, distributed irrigation systems for diversified cropping, nutrient use and loss in agriculture, biotechnology, aquaculture and livestock production, biofuels development, food price volatility, and food policy analysis.

    Teaching Activities:
    I teach courses on the world food economy, food and security, aquaculture science and policy, human society and environmental change, and food-water-health linkages. These courses are offered to graduate and undergraduate students through the departments of Earth System Science, Economics, History, and International Relations.

    Professional Activities:
    William Wrigley Professor of Earth Science (2015 - Present); Professor in Earth System Science (2009-present); Director, Stanford Center on Food Security and the Environment (2005-2018); Associate Professor of Economics by courtesy (2000-present); William Wrigley Senior Fellow, Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies and the Woods Institute for the Environment (2007-2015); Trustee, The Nature Conservancy CA program (2012-present); Member of the Scientific Advisory Board for the Beijer Institute for Ecological Economics in Stockholm (2011-present), for the Aspen Global Change Institute (2011-present), and for the Aldo Leopold Leadership Program (2012-present); Aldo Leopold Leadership Fellow in Environmental Science and Public Policy (1999); Pew Fellow in Conservation and the Environment (1994). Associate Editor for the Journal on Food Security (2012-present). Editorial board member for Aquaculture-Environment Interactions (2009-present) and Global Food Security (2012-present).