School of Earth, Energy and Environmental Sciences


Showing 1-42 of 42 Results

  • Atilla Aydin

    Atilla Aydin

    Professor (Research) of Geological and Environmental Sciences, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsFormation, geometric patterns and fluid flow properties of fractures and faults in a broad range of scales.

  • Dennis Bird

    Dennis Bird

    Professor of Geological Sciences, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsTheoretical geochemistry of reactions among aqueous solutions and minerals in magma-hydrothermal systems; environmental geochemistry of toxic metals in the Mother Lode Gold region, CA, and the emergence of life in the aftermath of the Moon-forming impact, ca. 4.4Ga.

  • Kevin Boyce

    Kevin Boyce

    Professor of Geological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPaleontology/Geobiology; Fossil record of plant physiology and development; Evolution of terrestrial ecosystems including fungi, animals, and environmental feedbacks with the biota

  • Gordon Brown

    Gordon Brown

    Dorrell William Kirby Professor of Geology in the School of Earth Sciences, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsSurface and interface geochemistry; environmental fate of heavy metals; nanotechnology, applications of synchrotron radiation in geochemistry and mineralogy

  • Dale Burns

    Dale Burns

    Physical Sci Res Scientist

    BioI manage the Stanford Mineral and Microchemical Analysis Facility. My primary responsibilities include developing and testing procedures for measuring major and trace element concentrations in a variety of solid materials, working with Stanford researchers (and external users) to design experiments and collect, interpret, and publish data, and overseeing the long-term development and trajectory of the Mineral and Microchemical Analysis Facility both within the Stanford School of Earth, Energy, and Environmental Sciences and in the greater Stanford community.

  • Jef Caers

    Jef Caers

    Professor of Geological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research focuses on the exploration & exploitation of geological resources, from data acquisition to decision making under uncertainty and risk assessment.

  • Page Chamberlain

    Page Chamberlain

    Professor of Geological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch
    I use stable and radiogenic isotopes to understand Earth system history. These studies examine the link between climate, tectonics, biological, and surface processes. Projects include: 1) examining the terrestrial climate history of the Earth focusing on periods of time in the past that had CO 2-levels similar to the present and to future projections; and 2) addressing how the chemical weathering of the Earth's crust affects both the long- and short-term carbon cycle. Field areas for these studies are in the Cascades, Rocky Mountains, Sierra Nevada, the European Alps, Tibet and the Himalaya and the Southern Alps of New Zealand.

    International Collaborations
    Much of the research that I do has an international component. Specifically, I have collaborations with: 1) the Senckenberg Biodiversity and Climate Research Center in Frankfurt Germany as a Humboldt Fellow and 2) the Chinese University of Geosciences in Bejiing China where I collaborate with Professor Yuan Gao.

    Teaching
    I teach courses at the undergraduate and graduate level in isotope biogeochemistry, Earth system history, and the relationship between climate, surface processes and tectonics.

    Professional Activities
    Editor American Journal of Science; Co-Director Stanford Stable Isotope Biogeochemistry Laboratory (present);Chair, Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences (2004-07); Co-Director Stanford/USGS SHRIMP Ion microprobe facility (2001-04)

  • Matthew Coble

    Matthew Coble

    Phys Sci Res Assoc, Geological Sciences

    BioFrom 2012 until 2019, I co-managed the SHRIMP-RG ion-microprobe at Stanford University. I oversaw operation of the laboratories and work closely with Stanford scientists, students, and visiting scientists to undertake measurements on the SHRIMP-RG. This includes training users in SIMS methods, assisting with sample preparation/characterization, data acquisition, reduction, interpretation, and publication of results. I also contribute to the development and refinement of new techniques and standard development efforts on the SHRIMP-RG.

    My research focuses on understanding the timescales of magmatic processes and the sources of crystal diversity in magmatic systems. To accomplish this, I use radiometric dating (238U-230Th, 238U-206Pb, 40Ar-39Ar, and U-Th/He) and chemical analysis of minerals to investigate the temporal and compositional history of magmas. I integrate these results to better understand how magmas evolved in the crust leading up to eruption, and the geology of these deposits exposed on Earth’s surface today. The methods I utilize involve electron microprobe (EMP), secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), nanoSIMS, and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS).

    One of the exciting and challenging components of my research is finding analytical techniques to answer complicated petrogenetic questions. To do this, one of the main tools I employ is the high spatial resolution of SIMS in order to measure trace elements and isotopic ages simultaneously, often in-situ, from the same analyte volume (~4 ng). Additionally, using the relatively slow sputter rate of the SIMS method (10’s of nm/min), I have applied this approach to depth profiling into fresh, unpolished mineral surfaces to target the last phase of mineral growth. This have been extremely useful for dating zircons with complicated histories. For example, I have been working on radiometrically dating geologically young volcanic zircons (Quaternary in age) where the outermost micron of grain yields crystallization ages that agree with Ar-Ar and U-Th/He eruption ages, whereas the interiors contain older inherited portions of the grains. Another example is applying this technique to dating thing (<2 micron) metaphoric rims surround an older protolith core, which would be impossible to analyze using traditional techniques of polishing zircon to expose the interiors of the grains.

    Please visit https://shrimprg.stanford.edu/ for more information about the SHRIMP-RG and SIMS.

    I have recently moved to Wellington, New Zealand. However, I remain actively involved in numerous on-gong projects at Stanford University and in the SHRIMP- RG lab as a consulting scientist. Please contact me using my stanford.edu or gmail accounts if you have question about previous or ongoing research projects.

  • Marco Einaudi

    Marco Einaudi

    Welton Joseph and Maud L'Anphere Crook Professor of Applied Earth Sciences, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOre deposits and exploration; geology and geochemistry of hydrothermal mineral deposits

  • W Gary Ernst

    W Gary Ernst

    The Benjamin M. Page Professor in Earth Sciences, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPetrology/geochemistry and plate tectonics of Circumpacific and Alpine mobile belts; ultrahigh-pressure metamorphism in Eurasia; geology of the California Coast Ranges, the cental Klamath Mountains, and White-Inyo Range; geobotany and remote sensing of the American Southwest; mineralogy and human health.

  • Rodney Ewing

    Rodney Ewing

    Frank Stanton Professor in Nuclear Security, Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies and at the Precourt Institute for Energy

    BioRod Ewing is the Frank Stanton Professor in Nuclear Security in the Center for International Security and Cooperation in the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies and a Professor in the Department of Geological Sciences in the School of Earth, Energy and Environmental Sciences at Stanford University. He is the Edward H. Kraus Distinguished University Professor Emeritus at the University of Michigan, where he was in three Departments: Earth & Environmental Sciences, Nuclear Engineering & Radiological Sciences, and Materials Science and Engineering. He is also a Regents' Emeritus Professor at the University of New Mexico.

    Ewing received a B.S. degree in geology from Texas Christian University (1968, summa cum laude) and M.S. (l972) and Ph.D. (l974, with distinction) degrees from Stanford University where he held an NSF Fellowship. His graduate studies focused on an esoteric group of minerals, metamict Nb-Ta-Ti oxides, which are unusual because they have become amorphous due to radiation damage caused by the presence of radioactive elements. Over the past forty years, the early study of these unusual minerals has blossomed into a broadly based research program on radiation effects in complex ceramic materials. This has led to the development of techniques to predict the long-term behavior of materials, such as those used in radioactive waste disposal. He is the author or co-author of over 750 research publications and the editor or co-editor of 18 monographs, proceedings volumes or special issues of journals. He has published widely in mineralogy, geochemistry, materials science, nuclear materials, physics and chemistry in over 100 different ISI journals. He has been granted a patent for the development of a highly durable material for the immobilization of excess weapons plutonium.

    Ewing has received the Hawley Medal of the Mineralogical Association of Canada in 1997 and 2002, a Guggenheim Fellowship in 2002, the Dana Medal of the Mineralogical Society of America in 2006, the Lomonosov Gold Medal of the Russian Academy of Sciences in 2006, a Honorary Doctorate from the Université Pierre et Marie Curie in 2007, Roebling Medal of the Mineralogical Society of America, and is a foreign Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada. He is also a fellow of the Geological Society of America, Mineralogical Society of America, American Geophysical Union, Geochemical Society and the European Association of Geochemistry, American Ceramic Society, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, Mineralogical Society of Great Britain and Ireland, and the Materials Research Society. He was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 2017.

    He has been president of the Mineralogical Society of America (2002) and the International Union of Materials Research Societies (1997-1998). Ewing has served on the Board of Directors of the Geochemical Society (2012-2015) and the Board of Governors of the Gemological Institute of America (2006-2015). He is a member of the Science and Security Board of the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists and on the Editorial Board of Applied Physics Reviews . He is a founding Editor of the magazine Elements, which is now supported by 17 earth science societies, and a Founding Executive Editor of Geochemical Perspective Letters. He is a member of the Board of Earth Sciences and Resources of the National Academy of Science, Engineering and Medicine (2017-2020).

    Professor Ewing is co-editor of and a contributing author of Radioactive Waste Forms for the Future (North-Holland Physics, Amsterdam, 1988) and Uncertainty Underground – Yucca Mountain and the Nation’s High-Level Nuclear Waste (MIT Press, 2006). He has served on eleven National Research Council committees for the National Academy of Sciences that have reviewed issues related to nuclear waste and nuclear weapons. He was appointed by President Obama to Chair the Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board (2012-2017).

  • Martin Grove

    Martin Grove

    Professor (Research) of Geological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch
    I study the evolution of the Earth's crust by undertaking petrologic and geochemically-based research that is grounded with fieldwork. I co-direct the Stanford-USGS ion probe laboratory and develop geochronologic methods to constrain crystallization, metamorphic, and metasomatic histories of the middle to deep crust. Similarly, because heat flow characteristically attends mass transfer during crustal deformation, I employ 40Ar/39Ar and (U-Th)/He thermochronology to extract thermal history information from minerals to constrain the timing and magnitude of fault slip as well as erosional and tectonic denudation. Finally, I am heavily involved in provenance studies to constrain aspects of crustal deformation and erosion that are only preserved in the sedimentary record.

  • Elizabeth Hadly

    Elizabeth Hadly

    Paul S. and Billie Achilles Professor in Environmental Biology, Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment and Professor, by courtesy, of Geological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsElizabeth Hadly and her lab probe how perturbations such as climatic change and human modification of the environment influence the evolution and ecology of animals.

  • George Hilley

    George Hilley

    Professor of Geological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsActive tectonics, quantitative structural geology and geomorphology; Geographic Information Systems;unsaturated zone gas transport; landscape development;active deformation and mountain belt growth in central Asia, central Andes, and along the San Andreas Fault; integrated investigation of earthquake hazards.

  • James C. Ingle, Jr.

    James C. Ingle, Jr.

    The W. M. Keck Professor of Earth Sciences, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCurrent research interests include the Neogene stratigraphy, paleoceanography, and depositional history of marine basins and continental margins of the Pacific Ocean with a focus on the California borderland and Gulf of California. Other interests involve study of marine diatomaceous sediments, the sedimentary record of the oxygen minimum zone, and application of benthic and planktonic foraminifera to questions surrounding the history of the global ocean and climate change.

  • Simon Klemperer

    Simon Klemperer

    Professor of Geophysics and, by courtesy, of Geological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI study the growth, tectonic evolution, and deformation of the continents. My research group undertakes field experiments in exemplary areas such as, currently, the Tibet plateau (formed by collision between Indian and Asia); the actively extending Basin-&-Range province of western North America (the Ruby Range Metamorphic Core Complex, NV, and the leaky transform beneath the Salton Trough, CA). We use active and passive seismic methods, electromagnetic recording, and all other available data!

  • Mathieu Lapôtre

    Mathieu Lapôtre

    Assistant Professor of Geological Sciences and, by courtesy, of Geophysics

    BioProf. Lapôtre leads the Earth & Planetary Surface Processes group. His research focuses on the physics behind sedimentary and geomorphic processes that shape planetary surfaces (including Earth's), and aims to untangle what landforms and rocks tell us about the past hydrology, climate, and habitability of planets.

  • Andrew Leslie

    Andrew Leslie

    Assistant Professor of Geological Sciences and, by courtesy, of Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI am interested in morphological evolution. I approach this broad topic by investigating how interactions among form, function, and environment have influenced evolutionary patterns in plant reproductive structures over million-year time scales. This approach requires synthesizing information from different disciplines, and my work uses approaches from paleontology, biomechanics, phylogenetics, and biogeography.

  • Juhn Liou

    Juhn Liou

    Professor of Geological and Environmental Sciences, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPetrochemical processes and tectonics of ultrahigh-pressure metamorphic terranes

  • Keith Loague

    Keith Loague

    Professor of Geological Sciences, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsRESEARCH, TEACHING, & SERVICE


    RESEARCH (see PUBLICATIONS)

    We conducted (past tense) process-based characterizations of surface & near-surface hydrologic response, based upon comprehensive field observations and sophisticated numerical simulations.

    Group Members (with degrees earned):
    John Griggs PhD, Jennifer Kleveno MS, Robert Miyahira MS, Ephraim Leon-Guerrero MS, Domingo Molina MS, Robert Abrams MS, Ricardo Diaz-Diaz Post Doctoral Fellow, Erik Wahlstrom MS, Robert Abrams PhD, Robert Abrams Post Doctoral Fellow, Jim Blanke MS CoTerm, Anona Dutton MS CoTerm, D’Artagnan Lloyd MS, Melissa Mills MS, Edzer Pebesma Visiting Scholar, Iris Stewart PhD, Luis Ugalde MS, Joel VanderKwaak Post Doctoral Fellow, Dennis Corwin Visiting Scholar, Leigh Soutter PhD, Robert Abrams Research Associate, Qihua Ran MS, Lauren Benson MS CoTerm, Qihua Ran PhD, Adrianne Carr PhD, Christopher Heppner PhD, Susan BeVille MS CoTerm, Brian Ebel PhD, Brian Ebel Post Doctoral Fellow, Benjamin Mirus PhD, Mollie Pettit MS, Kristin Mayer MS, Matthew Thomas PhD, & Matthew Thomas Post Doctoral Fellow




    TEACHING (courses taught, repeatedly)

    University of Hawaii, Manoa (~ 1,000 days):
    GG455 Groundwater Geology, GG654 Groundwater Contamination, GG655 Groundwater Modeling, & GG656 Transport Modeling

    University of California, Berkeley (2,222 days):
    FRM109 Wildland Hydrology, SS150 Soil Hydrology, SS250 Vadose Zone Modeling, & SS251 Hillslope Hydrology

    Leland Stanford Junior University (8,431 days):
    GES-43Q Environmental Problems, GES-130 Environmental Earth Sciences I, GES-131 Environmental Earth Sciences II, GES-130 Soil Physics and Hydrology, GES-131 Hydrologically-Driven Landscape Evolution, GES-140 Geomorphology, GES-230 Hydrogeology, GES-332b Seminar in Hydrogeology, GES-237 Surface and Near-Surface Hydrologic Response, GES-238 Soil Physics, & GES-239 Advanced Geomorphology




    SERVICE (US Army - enlisted (draft # 355) - 1,096 days active duty; final rank E5 / SP5)

    MOS (67Y20 / 67N20): crew chief AH-1G (i.e., Cobra, aka "snake") & UH-1H (i.e., Huey, aka "slick") helicopters, respectively

    Stateside - Fort Wayne MI, Fort Knox KY (D-12-5 "tigers one and all"), Fort Eustis VA, Fort Stewart GA, Hunter Army Airfield GA, Treasure Island CA, Fort Carson CO, & Fort Benning GA

    Vietnam (volunteer, 328 days in country) - Saigon / Tan Son Nhut AB via Travis AFB, Alaska, & Yokota AFB (i.e., breathing in), Vung Tau, 611th Trans Company 1st Aviation Brigade @ Vien Long Army Airfield ("Delta Riggers" - crew chief, door gunner, rigger), Can Tho Army Airfield, F Troop 1st Calvalry Division @ Bien Hoa Air Base (Army side), & Saigon / Tan Son Nhut AB "again" (i.e., breathing out)

  • Donald Lowe

    Donald Lowe

    Max Steineke Professor in Earth Sciences
    On Leave from 09/01/2020 To 08/31/2021

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsClastic sedimentology, deep-water sedimentation mechanics and facies; Archean depositional systems and crustal development

  • Gail Mahood

    Gail Mahood

    Professor of Geological Sciences, Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOrigin and evolution of silicic magmas expressed in rhyolitic volcanic centers and shallow plutons; geologic histories of calderas; high-precision Ar-Ar geochronology applied to caldera-forming eruptions and flood basalts; formation of lithium deposits in volcanic environments; volcanic hazards in eastern California and western Saudi Arabia, geothermal systems; geoarchaeology

  • Matthew Malkowski

    Matthew Malkowski

    Acting Assistant Professor

    BioPersonal website: www.mmalkowski.com

    Stanford Project on Deep-water Depositional Systems: www.spodds.stanford.edu

  • Wendy Mao

    Wendy Mao

    Professor of Geological Sciences, of Photon Science and, by courtesy, of Geophysics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsUnderstanding the formation and evolution of planetary interiors; experimental mineral physics; materials in extreme environments.

  • Tim McHargue

    Tim McHargue

    Adjunct Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe architecture of turbidite depositional systems and implications for petroleum reservoir performance through the study of 3D reflection seismic volumes, outcrops, and modern deep marine systems. Research includes rules based forward modeling, controls on architectural variation, and clastic sequence stratigraphy.

  • Elizabeth Miller

    Elizabeth Miller

    Professor of Geological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsStructural geology and tectonics. Evolution and deformation of continental crust and its sedimentary cover, plate tectonics and continental deformation, geochronology and thermochronology. Current interests in the Cordillera, northern circum-Pacific, Russia and Arctic regions.

  • J. Moldowan

    J. Moldowan

    Professor (Research) of Geological and Environmental Sciences, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOrganic geochemistry; study of molecular fossils (biomarkers) and their use in petroleum system analysis, reservoir characterization, environmental monitoring, molecular paleontology, global change, petroleum biodegradation in reservoir. Studies of thermal cracking of petroleum by deep burial or catalytic alteration in deep source rocks and reservoirs by using diamondoids. Applications to unconventional petroleun exploration and development.

  • Tapan Mukerji

    Tapan Mukerji

    Professor (Research) of Energy Resources Engineering and, by courtesy, of Geophysics and of Geological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy students and I use theoretical, computational, and statistical models, to discover and understand fundamental relations between geophysical data and subsurface properties, to quantify uncertainty in our geomodels, and to address value of information for decision making under uncertainty.

  • Ayla Pamukcu

    Ayla Pamukcu

    Assistant Professor of Geological Sciences and, by courtesy, of Geophysics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI have long been fascinated by magmas and volcanic eruptions, for reasons ranging from purely academic (trying to understand the magmatic construction of Earth’s crust) to purely practical (developing effective monitoring and mitigation strategies for volcanic eruptions). Consequently, my research revolves around understanding how, when, where, and why magmas are stored, evolve, and ultimately do (or do not!) erupt.

    Within this context, I focus on two main themes: (1) the temporal, chemical, and physical, evolution of magmas, and (2) the interplay between magma storage conditions in the crust and magmatic processes. I employ a multi-faceted approach to explore these topics, integrating data from multiple scales and perspectives; my studies capitalize on information contained in field relations, crystal and melt inclusion textures (sizes, shapes, positions), crystal and volcanic glass geochemistry, geochronology, phase-equilibria and numerical modeling, and experiments. As a function of this approach, I am also engaged in the development of novel methods to address petrologic problems in new, better, and more refined ways than is currently possible.

    A major focus of my research has been on supereruptions – gigantic explosive eruptions the likes of which we have never seen in recorded human history – but I am continually exploring other kinds of magmatic systems. I am currently particularly interested in the links (or lack thereof) between extrusive (i.e., erupted) and intrusive (i.e., unerupted) magmas, similarities/differences between large- and small-volume eruptions, and similarities/differences between magmas generated at different levels of the crust. I have also had a longstanding interest in the interactions and relationships between humans and their geologic surroundings (particularly volcanoes).

  • Jonathan Payne

    Jonathan Payne

    Dorrell William Kirby Professor, Senior Associate Dean for Faculty Affairs, and Professor, by courtesy, of Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy goal in research is to understand the interaction between environmental change and biological evolution using fossils and the sedimentary rock record. How does environmental change influence evolutionary and ecological processes? And conversely, how do evolutionary and ecological changes affect the physical environment? I work primarily on the marine fossil record over the past 550 million years.

  • David Pollard

    David Pollard

    The Barney and Estelle Morris Professor of Earth Sciences, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research aims to understand how faults and fractures initiate and evolve in Earth's brittle crust, how they affect the flow of molten rock, groundwater, and hydrocarbons, and the crucial role faults and fractures play in earthquake generation, folding of sedimentary strata, and volcanic eruption.

  • Laura Schaefer

    Laura Schaefer

    Assistant Professor of Geological Sciences and, by courtesy, of Geophysics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interestsearly Earth atmosphere; planetary differentiation; rocky exoplanet atmospheric chemistry; planetary interiors; atmosphere-interior exchange on Earth-like planets; planetary habitability; Venus atmospheric evolution; volcanic gases on Io and volatile loss

  • Allegra Hosford Scheirer

    Allegra Hosford Scheirer

    Physical Sci Res Scientist

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch
    Allegra Hosford Scheirer is a research geophysicist at Stanford University, specializing in basin and petroleum system modeling. Her work is centered on the strong belief in the integration of geological, geochemical, and geophysical data in a unified working environment.

    Teaching
    She co-teaches courses and co-advises several graduate students with a focus on basin and petroleum system modeling and investigative methods for exploring conventional and unconventional hydrocarbons.

    Professional Activities
    Prior to joining Stanford, Allegra was a member of the Geophysical Unit of Menlo Park and the Energy Resources Program at the U.S. Geological Survey, where she constructed three-dimensional geologic models for use in the resource assessment process. Allegra has led and participated in numerous field programs at sea and in the United States. She is the editor of U.S.G.S. Professional Paper 1713 and a past Associate Editor of Journal of Geophysical Research.

  • Erik Sperling

    Erik Sperling

    Assistant Professor of Geological Sciences and, by courtesy, of Biology and Center Fellow, by courtesy, at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe research interests in the Sperling Lab are Earth history and the evolution of life, and the interactions between the biosphere and the geosphere. As such this research can generally be considered paleontology, insofar as paleontology encompasses all aspects of the history of life.

    Consequently, we define our research agenda by the questions we are interested in, rather than the tools used. This research incorporates multiple lines of evidence, and multiple tools, to investigate questions in the history of life. These lines of evidence include fossil data, molecular phylogenetics, sedimentary geochemistry, and developmental and ecological data from modern organisms. Ultimately, the goal is to link environmental change with organismal and ecological response through the lens of physiology.

    Our field research takes place all over the world--current areas include:

    -NW Canada (Yukon and Northwest Territories): Research has been conducted on the early Neoproterozoic Fifteenmile Group, Cryogenian and Ediacaran Windermere Supergroup, and on the Ordovician-Devonian Road River Group in the southern Richardson Mountains
    -Southern Canadian Cordillera: Work here has focused on the early Cambrian Mural Formation and its soft-bodied fauna.
    -England and Wales: Cambrian-Silurian successions in the Welsh Basin
    -Namibia: Ediacaran Nama Group
    -Upwelling zones: We study the oxygen minimum zone offshore California as an analogue for ancient low-oxygen oceans.

  • Jonathan Stebbins

    Jonathan Stebbins

    Professor of Geological Sciences, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interestsstructure and dynamics of crystalline, glassy, and molten inorganic materials and how these relate to geologically and technologically important properties and processes; solid state Nuclear Magnetic Resoance (NMR); mineralogy; igneous petrology; glass science

  • Sonia Tikoo-Schantz

    Sonia Tikoo-Schantz

    Assistant Professor of Geophysics and, by courtesy, of Geological Sciences

    BioI utilize paleomagnetism and fundamental rock magnetism as tools to investigate problems in the planetary sciences. By studying the remanent magnetism recorded within rocks from differentiated planetary bodies, I can learn about core processes that facilitate the generation of dynamo magnetic fields within the Earth, Moon, and planetesimals. Determining the longevities and paleointensities of dynamo fields that initially magnetized rocks also provides insight into the long-term thermal evolution (i.e., effects of secular cooling) of planetary bodies. I also use paleomagnetism to understand impact cratering events, which are the most ubiquitous modifiers of planetary surfaces across the solar system. Impact events produce heat, shock, and sometimes hydrothermal systems that are all capable of resetting magnetization within impactites and target rocks via thermal, shock, and chemical processes. Therefore, I am able to use a combination of paleomagnetic and rock magnetic characterization to investigate shock pressures, temperatures, structural changes, and post-impact chemical alteration experienced by cratered planetary surfaces.

  • Jane Kathryn Willenbring

    Jane Kathryn Willenbring

    Associate Professor of Geological Sciences

    BioJane Willenbring joined Stanford as an Associate Professor in the summer of 2020. Jane is a geologist who solves problems related to the Earth surface. Her research is primarily done to understand the evolution of the Earth’s surface - especially how landscapes are affected by tectonics, climate change, and life. She and her research group use geochemical techniques, high-resolution topographic data, field observations, and, when possible, couple these data to landscape evolution numerical models and ice sheet models. The geochemical tools she uses and develops often include cosmogenic nuclide systems, which provide powerful, novel methods to constrain rates of erosion and mineral weathering. Jane has also started to organize citizen science campaigns and apply basic science principles to problems of human health with an ultimate broader impact goal of cleaning up urban areas and environments impacted by agriculture. She received her B.Sc. with honors from the North Dakota State University where she was a McNair Scholar and in the NDSU scholars program. She holds a Masters degree from Boston University. Her Ph.D. is in Earth Science from Dalhousie University in Halifax, Nova Scotia Canada where she was a Killam Scholar. She was a Synthesis Postdoctoral Fellow through the National Center for Earth Surface Dynamics at the Saint Anthony Falls Lab at the University of Minnesota, and an Alexander von Humboldt Postdoctoral Fellow and then subsequently a Postdoctoral Researcher at the Helmholz GFZ Potsdam, Germany. Jane was previously an Associate Professor in the Geosciences Research Division and Thomas and Evelyn Page Chancellor's Endowed Faculty Fellow at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UC San Diego where she was the director of the Scripps Cosmogenic Isotope Laboratory (SCI-Lab). She was also a tenure-track professor at the University of Pennsylvania. She will be a Stanford University Gabilan Faculty Fellow in 2021-2023. She is a Fellow of the Geological Society of America and was the inaugural recipient of the Marguerite T. Williams award from the American Geophysical Union.