School of Earth, Energy and Environmental Sciences


Showing 1-45 of 45 Results

  • Adam Burnett

    Adam Burnett

    Ph.D. Student in Earth System Science

    BioI grew up in Westmoreland, New Hampshire, and graduated from Dartmouth College in 2018 with an undergraduate degree in physics. I am broadly interested in atmospheric dynamics, idealized modeling, and climate change. My current research uses aquaplanet simulations to explore what factors determine global tropical cyclone frequency. My hobbies include hiking, birdwatching, and playing the piano.

  • Nathan Dadap

    Nathan Dadap

    Ph.D. Student in Earth System Science

    BioNathan Dadap is a PhD student in Professor Alexandra Konings’ Group in the Earth System Science Department at Stanford University. He is interested in using remote sensing to better understand peatland hydrology - an important control on fire risk and carbon emissions. Currently, Nathan is working on a research project relating soil moisture and fire in Equatorial Asia. Prior to graduate school, Nathan worked at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency on hazardous waste issues. Nathan holds a BS in Applied Physics from Columbia University.

  • Frances Davenport

    Frances Davenport

    Ph.D. Student in Earth System Science

    BioFrances studies hydroclimate in the Department of Earth System Science at Stanford University. She is interested in how climate change will affect precipitation extremes, flooding, and water availability. Her research also aims to quantify the impacts of extreme events on society. In addition, she is interested in understanding the efficacy of various adaptation strategies for managing hydrologic extremes (for example, floods and droughts). Previously, Frances worked as a civil engineer on a variety of flood risk reduction and ecosystem restoration projects in Colorado and around the U.S. You can visit her personal website here: https://fdavenport.github.io

  • Bertrand Delorme

    Bertrand Delorme

    Ph.D. Student in Earth System Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsIn this work, I investigate how surface-generated equatorial waves could drive abyssal mixing in the ocean through a mechanism of near-bottom wave trapping as a result of the horizontal component of the Earth’s rotation.

  • Caroline Alexa Famiglietti

    Caroline Alexa Famiglietti

    Ph.D. Student in Earth System Science

    BioCaroline Famiglietti is a PhD candidate working with Prof. Alexandra Konings. She studies the terrestrial carbon cycle, focusing on understanding and reducing uncertainties in model projections of its behavior. In 2017, Caroline graduated summa cum laude from UCLA with a B.S. in Applied Mathematics and a minor in Geography/Environmental Studies. Her prior research experience includes work in the Carbon Cycle & Ecosystems group at NASA JPL from 2017-2018 and in the UC Berkeley Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering in 2016.

  • Anna Gomes

    Anna Gomes

    Ph.D. Student in Earth System Science

    BioMy main interests lie within anthropogenic climate change, environmental science, and agriculture. The complex system dynamics and interconnections between agriculture and the environment including nutrient cycling, energy use, and greenhouse gas emissions are a few of the most critical challenges for today's soil scientists. After completing a master’s degree in Sustainability Science and Environmental Studies at Lund University in Sweden, researching farmer adoption of practices which mitigate GHGs from arable soils in the Netherlands at Wageningen University, I started a PhD in Earth System Science at Stanford University, aiming to focus on soil and environmental biogeochemistry. In parallel to my work in academia, I have been working on a start-up to address food waste and food insecurity in CA (Ugly Food Market), in addition to being a team member on several projects including a sharing library (Circle Centre), a soil science educational platform (Soil Life), and other sustainability related initiatives.

  • Katerina Gonzales

    Katerina Gonzales

    Ph.D. Student in Earth System Science

    BioKaterina studies climate dynamics in the Department of Earth System Science at Stanford University. She is interested in climate change in the atmosphere, extreme precipitation events, and climate impacts. Her dissertation analyzes the characteristics of West Coast atmospheric rivers in a warming climate. Learn more about her research at her website: https://sites.google.com/view/katerina-r-gonzales

  • Andrew Hennig

    Andrew Hennig

    Ph.D. Student in Earth System Science

    BioAntarctic ice sheet, both of which have exhibited significant mass loss over the past few decades. If the two ice sheets were to fully collapse, they could be responsible for up to 15m of global sea level rise (roughly equal parts from both). This sea level rise would not only pose serious problems for coastal settlements, but cause serious changes to ecosystems, and could profoundly alter the Earth’s ocean circulation.

    Current estimates of the mass balance for ice sheets are based primarily on satellite data. This data has become more accurate and more available than ever before, since the 1990s. While estimates can be provided by satellite data, satellites are limited by virtue of the fact that they can only evaluate the surface of the ice shelf. Recent research has shown that a significant amount of the mass loss from the West Antarctic ice sheet is happening underwater, along grounding lines, where deep waters, warmed by global warming, enter the area underneath the ice shelf, and melt the shelves from the bottom. This not only results in mass loss directly, but increases calving of glaciers into the ocean, further accelerating their loss. This melting, below the surface of the ice shelves, cannot be estimated by satellites.

    To get a better understanding of the impact of warmer deep waters on glacial retreat in Western Antarctica, we need to measure the melt more directly. Using highly precise measurements of salinity and isotopic composition of seawater in coastal regions of Western Antarctica, we can estimate the amount of glacial meltwater present in the oceanic adjacent to ice sheets. Gaining a greater understanding of the rates and locations of West Antarctic melting will be crucial to developing our understanding of future sea level rise, and other wider impacts.

  • Natan Holtzman

    Natan Holtzman

    Ph.D. Student in Earth System Science

    BioNatan Holtzman is a third-year PhD student in the Earth System Science department working with Prof. Alexandra Konings. He uses remote sensing and modeling to study how water moves between the atmosphere, plants, and soil. Natan graduated from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 2016 with a B.S. with honors in Geological Sciences and minors in Mathematics and Biology.

  • Elizabeth Johnston

    Elizabeth Johnston

    Ph.D. Student in Earth System Science

    BioAs a PhD student in the Department of Earth System Science at Stanford University, Elizabeth investigates the signatures of climate on Earth's surface processes. She is interested in coupling high resolution satellite imagery, geochemical data, and/or climate model output with empirical models to answer research questions related to the response of landscapes and other surface processes to climate change.

  • Hannah Joy-Warren

    Hannah Joy-Warren

    Ph.D. Student in Earth System Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPolar biological oceanography

  • Bennett Kapili

    Bennett Kapili

    Ph.D. Student in Earth System Science

    BioBennett Kapili is a Ph.D. student in the Dekas Laboratory. He is interested in studying the microbial ecology and biogeochemistry of environments that push the limits of life. Through developing our understanding of how microbes function in extreme environments, he seeks to advance our search for life within our solar system. He holds a BS in Science of Earth Systems from Cornell University.

  • Colette Kelly

    Colette Kelly

    Ph.D. Student in Earth System Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMarine nitrogen biogeochemistry: field studies, isotope analysis, and vertical modeling of nitrous oxide production, consumption, and flux in the eastern tropical North Pacific Ocean.

  • Amina Ly

    Amina Ly

    Ph.D. Student in Earth System Science

    BioAmina is a PhD student in the Earth Systems Science Department at Stanford University. Her work is primarily focused on understanding climate change risks, impacts of extreme precipitation events, and human-climate interactions. Her current work explores climate impacts on food security and commodity values in developing regions.

  • Nicolette Meyer

    Nicolette Meyer

    Ph.D. Student in Earth System Science

    BioThe deep-sea is the Earth’s last frontier of exploration; thus, my research interests are examining the activity and ecology of archaea and bacteria that colonise marine sediments. Deep-sea microbial communities play an important role in the biogeochemical cycling of major elements (such as carbon, nitrogen and sulphur). By investigating the activity and diversity of deep-sea microbes, and the variables that affect community structure, we can begin to predict how these ecosystems may shift in the face of climate change, and whether they will act in positive or negative feedbacks to rising ocean temperatures. Furthermore, examining the ecology and metabolic activity of modern deep-sea ecosystems, we can begin to untangle the complex interactions between marine microbes and their environments, and extrapolate these relationships into the geological past to understand the co-evolution of life and Earth’s surficial environment.

  • Hannah Naughton

    Hannah Naughton

    Ph.D. Student in Environmental Earth System Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsGeneral research interests: How environmental chemistry influences soil and sediment microbial community dynamics and carbon cycling. Microbial activity plays a large role in carbon storage, greenhouse gas release, and the transport of toxic metals. However, microbial processes differ vastly depending on local environmental conditions. I study how the availability of substrates microbes use to generate energy affects microbial ecology and the processes and rates controlling carbon cycling.

  • Emily Paris

    Emily Paris

    Ph.D. Student in Earth System Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMicrobial Biogeochemistry, Microbial Life in Extreme Environments, Astrobiology

  • Krishna Rao

    Krishna Rao

    Ph.D. Student in Earth System Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research focuses on developing machine learning algorithms to remotely monitor vegetation health by using microwave remote sensing. I am interested in answering questions such as:
    - How can we leverage the vast amounts of data our satellites are capturing to understand the health of our forests?
    - How can we obtain information about hydraulic health of vegetation with little or no ground-collected data

  • Anna Rasmussen

    Anna Rasmussen

    Ph.D. Student in Earth System Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI am a microbial ecologist, generally interested in the connections between microbes and biogeochemical cycling. I use DNA-based and biogeochemical techniques to understand the ecology of nitrogen-cycling bacteria and archaea in the San Francisco Estuary.

  • Brian Rogers

    Brian Rogers

    Ph.D. Student in Earth System Science

    BioBrian is a first-year doctoral student in Earth System Science working with Dr. Kate Maher. Brian is interested in using advanced computational tools to develop better conceptual and quantitative understandings of how water interacts with the environment at the surface and shallow subsurface levels.

  • Benjamin Shapero

    Benjamin Shapero

    Ph.D. Student in Earth System Science

    BioI am a geomicrobiologist and am broadly interested in the connections between protein biochemistry, environmental microbiology, and biogeochemistry. I hail from the surf town of Encinitas near San Diego. I completed my undergraduate studies at the University of Southern California (USC), where I majored in both Biological Sciences and Classical Saxophone Performance. At USC I volunteered in a cellular and molecular neuroscience lab, and it was there that I discovered my fascination with proteins. After graduation, I worked in a vaccine design lab at Scripps Research. This research fostered my growing fascination with protein biochemistry and further exposed me to the realm of microbiology. I have since followed my interests in proteins and microbiology, along with my longstanding passion for climate science, to the field of geomicrobiology. I am currently pursuing a Ph.D. in geomicrobiology at Stanford University in the Earth System Science department.

  • Shersingh Tumber-Davila

    Shersingh Tumber-Davila

    Ph.D. Student in Environmental Earth System Science

    BioGrowing up in Puerto Rico and later New England, I grew an appreciation for the outdoor environment. This inspired me to pursue a B.S. in Environmental Conservation and Sustainability with a focus in Forest Ecology at the University of New Hampshire (UNH) and a minor in Forestry. At UNH I held numerous research positions, but I worked mainly at the Terrestrial Ecosystems Analysis Lab (TEAL) under the supervision of Andrew Ouimette. At TEAL we conducted research on forest ecosystem carbon and nitrogen dynamics, with emphasis on the effects of atmospheric deposition, air pollution and climate change. I managed numerous projects measuring leaf C, root C, soil C, LAI, and fungal C, but primarily worked on an independent project funded by a McNair Fellowship to understand the allocation of C to mycorrhizae, and mycorrhizal biomass on a tree species and nitrogen availability gradient in a northeastern temperate forest. At Stanford University I will continue to strengthen my understanding of the terrestrial carbon cycle, by deepening our knowledge of rooting growth, and studying how vegetation cover type is affected by different climatic factors such as drought.

    Please visit my personal site at to learn more about my research, education, and community engagement: https://sjtumber.weebly.com/

  • Marius von Essen

    Marius von Essen

    Ph.D. Student in Earth System Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsEnvironmental governance of land use in the tropics with a focus on jurisdictional approaches to sustainable resource use.

  • Jeff Wen

    Jeff Wen

    Ph.D. Student in Earth System Science
    Casual - Non-Exempt, Continuing Studies
    Stanford Student Employee, Continuing Studies

    BioJeff Wen is a PhD student in the Department of Earth System Science. His research interests are broadly focused on applying machine learning to understand the social impacts of climate change and make decisions under climate uncertainty. He was previously an Assembly Fellow at the Berkman Klein Center and MIT Media Lab studying the governance and ethics of AI and formerly a data scientist at Tesla. Jeff holds a Bachelors in Economics from Wharton and a Masters in Environmental Studies from the University of Pennsylvania.