School of Earth, Energy and Environmental Sciences


Showing 11-20 of 41 Results

  • Bertrand Delorme

    Bertrand Delorme

    Ph.D. Student in Earth System Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsIn this work, I investigate how surface-generated equatorial waves could drive abyssal mixing in the ocean through a mechanism of near-bottom wave trapping as a result of the horizontal component of the Earth’s rotation.

  • Caroline Alexa Famiglietti

    Caroline Alexa Famiglietti

    Ph.D. Student in Earth System Science

    BioCaroline Famiglietti is a PhD student working with Prof. Alexandra Konings. Her work centers around terrestrial carbon cycle model uncertainty, which she uses model-data fusion, remote sensing data analysis, and machine learning to parse. In 2017, Caroline graduated summa cum laude from UCLA with a B.S. in Applied Mathematics and a minor in Geography/Environmental Studies. Prior to graduate school, Caroline worked in the Carbon Cycle & Ecosystems group at NASA JPL from 2017-2018 and in the UC Berkeley Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering in 2016.

  • Katerina Gonzales

    Katerina Gonzales

    Ph.D. Student in Earth System Science

    BioKaterina studies climate dynamics in the Department of Earth System Science at Stanford University. She is interested in climate change in the atmosphere, extreme precipitation events, and climate impacts. Her dissertation analyzes the characteristics of West Coast atmospheric rivers in a warming climate. Learn more about her research at her website: https://sites.google.com/view/katerina-r-gonzales

  • Andrew Hennig

    Andrew Hennig

    Ph.D. Student in Earth System Science

    BioAntarctic ice sheet, both of which have exhibited significant mass loss over the past few decades. If the two ice sheets were to fully collapse, they could be responsible for up to 15m of global sea level rise (roughly equal parts from both). This sea level rise would not only pose serious problems for coastal settlements, but cause serious changes to ecosystems, and could profoundly alter the Earth’s ocean circulation.

    Current estimates of the mass balance for ice sheets are based primarily on satellite data. This data has become more accurate and more available than ever before, since the 1990s. While estimates can be provided by satellite data, satellites are limited by virtue of the fact that they can only evaluate the surface of the ice shelf. Recent research has shown that a significant amount of the mass loss from the West Antarctic ice sheet is happening underwater, along grounding lines, where deep waters, warmed by global warming, enter the area underneath the ice shelf, and melt the shelves from the bottom. This not only results in mass loss directly, but increases calving of glaciers into the ocean, further accelerating their loss. This melting, below the surface of the ice shelves, cannot be estimated by satellites.

    To get a better understanding of the impact of warmer deep waters on glacial retreat in Western Antarctica, we need to measure the melt more directly. Using highly precise measurements of salinity and isotopic composition of seawater in coastal regions of Western Antarctica, we can estimate the amount of glacial meltwater present in the oceanic adjacent to ice sheets. Gaining a greater understanding of the rates and locations of West Antarctic melting will be crucial to developing our understanding of future sea level rise, and other wider impacts.

  • Nataniel Moishe Holtzman

    Nataniel Moishe Holtzman

    Ph.D. Student in Earth System Science

    BioNatan Holtzman is a first-year PhD student in the Earth System Science department working with Prof. Alexandra Konings. He is interested in using remote sensing and modeling to study how water moves between the atmosphere, plants, and soil. Natan graduated from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 2016 with a B.S. with honors in Geological Sciences and minors in Mathematics and Biology. From 2017 to 2018, he worked as a research associate at UNC with Prof. Tamlin Pavelsky on improving the representation of snowmelt-driven runoff in a regional climate and land surface model.