School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences


Showing 1-10 of 13 Results

  • Jennifer Saltzman

    Jennifer Saltzman

    Lecturer, Geological Sciences
    Director of Outreach Education, School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences - Administration/Finance

    Current Role at StanfordJennifer directs the educational outreach programs in the School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences. These programs include Geokids, an early elementary school field trip to campus, the Earth Sciences High School Internships and teacher professional development opportunities. Jennifer serves as a pre-major advisor as well as provides mentoring to students who are interested in science education careers.

  • Nikhil Sawe

    Nikhil Sawe

    Lecturer, Emmett Interdisciplinary Program in Environment and Resources
    Temp - Non-Exempt, Center on Philanthropy and Civil Society

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThrough functional MRI, neuroeconomics analyzes the financial decision-making process at the level of discrete brain structures, allowing insights into the way we think about and route information. Nik's research adapts neuroeconomics techniques to assess decision-making in environmental questions.

  • Celine Scheidt

    Celine Scheidt

    Sr Research Engineer, Energy Resources Engineering

    BioCĂ©line Scheidt has worked extensively in uncertainty modeling, sensitivity analysis, geostatistics and in the use of distance-based methods in reservoir modeling. She obtained her PhD at Strasbourg University and the IFP (France) in applied mathematics, with a focus on the use of experimental design and geostatistical methods to model response surfaces.

  • Allegra Hosford Scheirer

    Allegra Hosford Scheirer

    Phys Sci Res Assoc, Geological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch
    Allegra Hosford Scheirer is a research geophysicist at Stanford University, specializing in basin and petroleum system modeling. Her work is centered on the strong belief in the integration of geological, geochemical, and geophysical data in a unified working environment.

    Teaching
    She co-teaches courses and co-advises several graduate students with a focus on basin and petroleum system modeling and investigative methods for exploring conventional and unconventional hydrocarbons.

    Professional Activities
    Prior to joining Stanford, Allegra was a member of the Geophysical Unit of Menlo Park and the Energy Resources Program at the U.S. Geological Survey, where she constructed three-dimensional geologic models for use in the resource assessment process. Allegra has led and participated in numerous field programs at sea and in the United States. She is the editor of U.S.G.S. Professional Paper 1713 and a past Associate Editor of Journal of Geophysical Research.

  • Dustin Schroeder

    Dustin Schroeder

    Assistant Professor of Geophysics and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    BioI am interested in the fundamental problem of observing, understanding, and predicting the behavior of ice and water in the earth system. I am particularly interested in the role that subglacial water plays in the evolution and stability of continental ice sheets and their contribution to the rate of sea level rise. I am also interested in the development, use, and analysis of geophysical radar remote sensing systems that are optimized to observe hypothesis- specific phenomena. I consider myself an instrument scientist and seek to approach problems from both an earth system science and radar system engineering perspective. By focusing on the flow of information and uncertainty through the entire process of instrument development, experimental design, data processing, analysis, and interpretation, I can draw upon a multidisciplinary set of tools to test system-scale and process-level hypotheses. For me, this deliberate combination of science and engineering is the most powerful and satisfying way to approach questions in earth and planetary science.

  • Paul Segall

    Paul Segall

    Professor of Geophysics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch
    I study active earthquake and volcanic process through data collection, inversion, and theoretical modeling. Using techniques such as the Global Positioning System (GPS) and Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) my students and I are able to measure deformation in space and time and invert these data for the geometry of faults and magma chambers, and spatiotemporal variations in fault slip-rate and magma chamber dilation. We use these results to develop and test models of active plate boundaries such as the San Andreas, and the Cascade subduction zone, the nucleation of earthquakes, slow slip events, and the physics of magma migration leading to volcanic eruptions.

    Teaching
    I teach introductory undergraduate classes in natural hazards and the prediction of volcanic eruptions, as well as graduate level courses on modeling earthquake and volcano deformation and geophysical inverse theory.

    Professional Activities
    James B. Macelwane Medal, American Geophysical Union (1990); fellow, American Geophysical Union (1990); fellow, Geological Society of America (1997); president, Tectonophysics Section, AGU (2002-04); U.S.G.S. Science of Earthquakes Advisory Committee (2002-06); California Earthquake Prediction Evaluation Committee (2003-07); chair, Plate Boundary Observatory Steering Committee (2003-06); N.S.F. Panel, Instruments and Facilities Program (1997-2000); associate editor, Journal of Geophysical Research (1984-87). William Smith Lecturer, Geological Society of London (2011). Charles A. Whitten Medal, American Geophysical Union (2014), National Academy of Sciences (2016)

  • Norman Sleep

    Norman Sleep

    Professor of Geophysics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPhysics of large-scale processes in the Earth

  • Erik Sperling

    Erik Sperling

    Assistant Professor of Geological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe research interests in the Sperling Lab are Earth history and the evolution of life, and the interactions between the biosphere and the geosphere. As such this research can generally be considered paleontology, insofar as paleontology encompasses all aspects of the history of life.

    Consequently, we define our research agenda by the questions we are interested in, rather than the tools used. This research incorporates multiple lines of evidence, and multiple tools, to investigate questions in the history of life. These lines of evidence include fossil data, molecular phylogenetics, sedimentary geochemistry, and developmental and ecological data from modern organisms. Ultimately, the goal is to link environmental change with organismal and ecological response through the lens of physiology.

    Our field research takes place all over the world--current areas include:

    -NW Canada (Yukon and Northwest Territories): Research has been conducted on the early Neoproterozoic Fifteenmile Group, Cryogenian and Ediacaran Windermere Supergroup, and on the Ordovician-Devonian Road River Group in the southern Richardson Mountains
    -Southern Canadian Cordillera: Work here has focused on the early Cambrian Mural Formation and its soft-bodied fauna.
    -England and Wales: Cambrian-Silurian successions in the Welsh Basin
    -Namibia: Ediacaran Nama Group
    -Upwelling zones: We study the oxygen minimum zone offshore California as an analogue for ancient low-oxygen oceans.