School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences


Showing 1-10 of 48 Results

  • Gabriel Lotto

    Gabriel Lotto

    Ph.D. Student in Geophysics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsTsunamis are some of the most devastating natural disasters than can occur. In just the last 15 years, two tsunamis - the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami and the 2011 Japan tsunami - killed hundreds of thousands of people and destroyed billions of dollars of property. Despite the importance of understanding these dangerous waves, there is still much we do not understand about how tsunamis are generated.

    The largest tsunamis are caused by megathrust earthquakes in subduction zones, when shallow coseismic slip between tectonic plates causes the seafloor to deform, uplifting the ocean surface and initiating a tsunami. Tsunamis can also be caused by earthquakes with smaller magnitude that are more efficient at generating tsunamis. These are called “tsunami earthquakes,” and they may result from slip along high angle splay faults or through a very compliant wedge of sedimentary materials in the trench.

    When an earthquake generates a tsunami, it also excites a wide range of fast-propagating seismic and ocean acoustic waves, some of which get trapped in the ocean and may contain valuable information about the size of the tsunami. These trapped waves could potentially be useful for improving tsunami early warning systems.

    To better understand these types of problems, we use numerical models that fully couple dynamic rupture on the fault to the elastic response of the earth and ocean. This means that we can model the full seismic, ocean acoustic, and tsunami wavefield that results from a subduction zone earthquake. This way we can explore and investigate some of the complexities of tsunami generation.

  • Anna Lee

    Anna Lee

    Ph.D. Student in Environment and Resources
    Stanford Student Employee, Hume Center

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsAnna's research interests are how people learn about and make decisions related to food and waste.

  • Eric Lambin

    Eric Lambin

    George and Setsuko Ishiyama Provostial Professor and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch
    My research is in the area of human-environment interactions in land systems. I develop integrated approaches to study land use change by linking remote sensing, GIS and socio-economic data. I aim at better understanding causes and impacts of changes in tropical forests, drylands, and farming systems. I currently focus on three related themes: land use transitions – i.e., the shift from deforestation (or land degradation) to reforestation (or land sparing for nature), – the influence of globalization on land use decisions, and the interactions between public and private governance aimed at promoting sustainable land use. My research is mostly focused on tropical regions in Africa, Asia and Latin America.

    Teaching
    I teach a course for graduate and undergraduate students on satellite remote sensing of land (Winter). In Spring, I co-teach a graduate-level course on Earth System Dynamics, including the human dimensions of global environmental changes.

    Professional Activities
    I was Chair of the international scientific project Land Use and Land Cover Change (IGBP/IHDP LUCC) from 1999 to 2005. I also contributed to the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment. I am often consulted by international organizations on issues related to tropical deforestation, desertification and the potential role of tropical forests in mitigating climate change. I am Foreign associate at the U.S. National Academy of Sciences. In addition to my research at Stanford, I am involved in several European research projects.