School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences


Showing 1-20 of 70 Results

  • Wendy Mao

    Wendy Mao

    Associate Professor of Geological Sciences, of Photon Science and, by courtesy, of Geophysics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsUnderstanding the formation and evolution of planetary interiors; experimental mineral physics; materials in extreme environments.

  • Gerald M Mavko

    Gerald M Mavko

    Professor (Research) of Geophysics, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch
    I work to discover and understand the relationship between geophysical measurements and the rock and fluid properties that they sample in the Earth. My students and I have begun to understand the impact of rock type, porosity, pore fluids, temperature, and stress on seismic wave propagation and electromagnetic response. We are also working to quantify the links between geophysical measurements and the sedimentary and diagenetic processes that determine rock mineralogy and texture. Ultimately, this work allows us to better infer, from geophysical images, the composition and physical conditions at depth.

    Teaching
    I teach courses for graduate and undergraduate students on rock physics--the study of the physical properties of rocks and how they can be detected and mapped using seismic and electrical methods. This includes theory, laboratory measurements, and field data analysis. I also lead seminars in which students present and critique their ongoing research in rock physics.

    Professional Activities
    Associate chair, Department of Geophysics (2006-2008); distinguished lecturer, Society of Exploration Geophysicists (2006); honorary membership, Society of Exploration Geophysicists (2001); nominated for Reginald Fessenden Award, Society of Exploration Geophysicists (2000); School of Earth Sciences Excellence in Teaching Award (2000)

  • Katharine (Kate) Maher

    Katharine (Kate) Maher

    Associate Professor of Earth System Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch
    Chemical reactions between fluids and minerals create the environments that are uniquely characteristic of Earth’s surface. For example, chemical weathering reactions support the growth of soils and organisms and regulate the flow of elements to the oceans. The rates of these reactions also control the release and storage of natural and human-derived contaminants. Over geologic timescales, mineral-fluid reactions have helped to maintain a mostly habitable planet. Over human timescales, these reactions will regulate our ability to use Earth’s resources, such as soils, waters, and minerals.

    My research focuses on the rates of reactions in different environments using a combination of geochemical tools, including isotope geochemistry, geochemical and hydrologic modeling, and geochronology in order to address the following themes: (1) defining the controls on mineral-fluid reactions rates in the environment (2) finding new approaches to use mineral-fluid reactions to safely store carbon dioxide in the subsurface; and (3) development of isotopic approaches to study mineral-fluid reactions in the environments of Earth’s past. To support these research themes, I have constructed a new mass spectrometer and clean lab facility capable of high precision geochemical and isotopic measurements, and teach a number of classes and short courses on reactive transport.

    Teaching
    My teaching focuses on introducing students to the questions and major challenges in low-temperature and environmental geochemistry, and the application of isotope geochemistry to environmental and geologic problems. In order to introduce incoming students to Earth surface processes, materials and geochemistry, I am also teaching a freshman seminar on forensic geoscience. At the graduate level, I offer classes on isotope geochemistry and modeling of environmental transformations and mass transfer processes (i.e., subsurface reactive transport).

  • Tapan Mukerji

    Tapan Mukerji

    Associate Professor (Research) of Energy Resources Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy students and I use theoretical, computational, and statistical models, to discover and understand fundamental relations between geophysical data and subsurface properties, to quantify uncertainty in our geomodels, and to address value of information for decision making under uncertainty.

  • Gail Mahood

    Gail Mahood

    Professor of Geological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsIgneous petrogenesis and magmatic evolution of silicic magmas and physical evolution of related volcanic centers and subjacent plutons, volcanic hazards in eastern California and western Saudi Arabia, geochronology, extension-related magmatism, geoarchaeology

  • Elizabeth Miller

    Elizabeth Miller

    Professor of Geological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsStructural geology and tectonics. Evolution and deformation of continental crust and its sedimentary cover, plate tectonics and continental deformation, geochronology and thermochronology. Current interests in the Cordillera, northern circum-Pacific, Russia and Arctic regions.

  • Pamela Matson

    Pamela Matson

    Richard and Rhoda Goldman Professor in Environmental Studies and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute

    BioPamela Matson is an internationally recognized interdisciplinary Earth scientist, academic leader and organizational strategist.

    A MacArthur Fellow and elected member of the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts & Sciences, Matson has served as dean of the School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences at Stanford since 2002. She has led the School through significant change, targeted at helping improve the University’s ability to engage in use- inspired research and to educate future leaders in the sustainability challenges related to Earth resources, hazards and environment. During the same time period, Matson co-led the Stanford Challenge Initiative on Environment and Sustainability, and helped build the Woods Institute for the Environment and the Precourt Institute for Energy as well as the Emmett Interdisciplinary Program in Environment and Resources.

    Scientifically, Matson is a global thought leader who works to reconcile the needs of people and the planet in the 21st century. Her research addresses a range of environment and sustainability issues, including sustainability of agricultural systems; vulnerability of particular people and places to climate change; and environmental consequences of tropical land use change and global change in the nitrogen and carbon cycles. With multidisciplinary teams of researchers, managers, and decision makers, she has worked to develop agricultural approaches that reduce environmental impacts while maintaining livelihoods and human wellbeing.

    Matson is coauthor of Pursuing Sustainability (Princeton University Press 2016), which helps students and practitioners understand the complex social-environmental system that is essential to moving sustainability goals forward, whether through new technologies, processes or policies. Matson is also editor of Seeds of Sustainability (Island Press 2011), and contributed to the National Research Council volumes of Our Comon Journey: A Transition towards Sustainability and America’s Climate Choices. She is the founding co-chair of the National Academies’ Roundtable on Science and Technology for Sustainability, and serves on the boards of FFAR (Foundation for Food and Agriculture Research, World Wildlife Fund and Climate Works Foundation. She is a past president of the Ecological Society of America, past lead author for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, and was a member of the science leadership committee for the International Geosphere-Atmosphere Programme.

  • Tim McHargue

    Tim McHargue

    Adjunct Professor, Geological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe architecture of turbidite depositional systems and implications for petroleum reservoir performance through the study of 3D reflection seismic volumes, outcrops, and modern deep marine systems. Research includes rules based forward modeling, controls on architectural variation, and clastic sequence stratigraphy.

  • Kristian Meisling

    Kristian Meisling

    Adjunct Professor, Department of Geological Sciences

    BioKris Meisling has 28 years of experience working as a Structural Geologist, Regional Geologic Integrator, and Basin Analyst in upstream technology and consulting at ARCO, Mobil, and BP. Kris left BP in 2009 to start his consulting practice, and was appointed Consulting Professor at Stanford University in 2010. Kris is primarily working with Elizabeth Miller and her students on plate restorations of the Arctic incorporating new detrital zircon constraints. In 2013 Kris joined Elizabeth's Team working on the Alaska & East Russian segment of the Arctic as part of the Circum Arctic Lithosphere Evolution (CALE) Program. Kris has also been working with Steve Graham and his students on structural interpretation of seismic data for input to basin models as part of the BPSM (Basin & Petroleum Systems Modeling) Program.

  • Ryan Jeffrey McCarty

    Ryan Jeffrey McCarty

    Workstudy Student, Department of Geological Sciences

    BioRyan J. McCarty is an interdisciplinary researcher who uses spectroscopic and computational approaches to study observe crystalline materials. In addition to his research, Ryan is a passionate educator who believes in merging hands on experimental learning with fundamental concepts to make an engaging classroom experience. Ryan is also an advocate for opening up the academic process to a greater diversity of student minds while increasing transparency and access to engineering and science. Check out his website for more information: http://ryanjmccarty.com