School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences


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  • Jenny Suckale

    Jenny Suckale

    Assistant Professor of Geophysics and, by courtesy, of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    BioBefore joining Stanford in January 2014, I held a position as Lecturer in Applied Mathematics and as a Ziff Environmental Fellow at Harvard. I hold a PhD in Geophysics from MIT and a Master in Public Administration from the Harvard Kennedy School. Prior to joining graduate school, I worked as a scientific consultant for different international organizations aiming to reduce the impact of natural and environmental disasters in vulnerable communities.

    The goal of my research is to advance our basic understanding and predictive capabilities of complex multi-phase flows that are fundamental to Earth science. I pursue this goal by developing original computational methods customized for the problem at hand. The phenomena I explore range from the microscopic to the planetary scale and space a wide variety of geophysics systems such as volcanoes, glaciers, and magma oceans.

    I have taught both undergraduate and graduate courses in scientific, planetary evolution, and natural disasters. Since arriving at Stanford in January 2014, I have co-taught GES 118, Understanding Natural Hazards, Quantifying Risk, Increasing Resilience in Highly Urbanized Regions.

  • Gabriel Lotto

    Gabriel Lotto

    Ph.D. Student in Geophysics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsTsunamis are some of the most devastating natural disasters than can occur. In just the last 15 years, two tsunamis - the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami and the 2011 Japan tsunami - killed hundreds of thousands of people and destroyed billions of dollars of property. Despite the importance of understanding these dangerous waves, there is still much we do not understand about how tsunamis are generated.

    The largest tsunamis are caused by megathrust earthquakes in subduction zones, when shallow coseismic slip between tectonic plates causes the seafloor to deform, uplifting the ocean surface and initiating a tsunami. Tsunamis can also be caused by earthquakes with smaller magnitude that are more efficient at generating tsunamis. These are called “tsunami earthquakes,” and they may result from slip along high angle splay faults or through a very compliant wedge of sedimentary materials in the trench.

    When an earthquake generates a tsunami, it also excites a wide range of fast-propagating seismic and ocean acoustic waves, some of which get trapped in the ocean and may contain valuable information about the size of the tsunami. These trapped waves could potentially be useful for improving tsunami early warning systems.

    To better understand these types of problems, we use numerical models that fully couple dynamic rupture on the fault to the elastic response of the earth and ocean. This means that we can model the full seismic, ocean acoustic, and tsunami wavefield that results from a subduction zone earthquake. This way we can explore and investigate some of the complexities of tsunami generation.

  • Fatemeh Sadat Rassouli

    Fatemeh Sadat Rassouli

    Ph.D. Student in Geophysics

    BioI am a PhD candidate in the department of Geophysics. Currently, I am studying the time dependent behavior of carbonate and clay rich shales at different reservoir stress and temperature conditions.

    I obtained my M.Sc. in Mining Exploitation at University of Tehran. For my Master’s thesis I worked on new method of obtaining creep characteristics of soft rocks, called impression creep test. This new method greatly reduces time and material usually needed for conventional creep tests and makes it an economic mean to obtain creep characteristics of soft rocks.

    I conducted my experiments in different laboratories at University of Tehran, Tokai University of Japan, Toyota National College of Technology and in Material and Energy Research Center. Right now I am a research assistant in Stress and Crustal Mechanics Lab. at Stanford University.