School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences


Showing 1-100 of 701 Results

  • Peter Vitousek

    Peter Vitousek

    Clifford G. Morrison Professor in Population and Resource Studies, Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment and Professor, by courtesy, of Earth System Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsVitousek's research interests include: evaluating the global cycles of nitrogen and phosphorus, and how they are altered by human activity; understanding how the interaction of land and culture contributed to the sustainability of Hawaiian (and other Pacific) agriculture and society before European contact; and working to make fertilizer applications more efficient and less environmentally damaging (especially in rapidly growing economies)

  • Elizabeth Hadly

    Elizabeth Hadly

    Paul S. and Billie Achilles Professor in Environmental Biology, Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment and Professor, by courtesy, of Geological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe research of Elizabeth Hadly probes how perturbations such as climatic change and human modification of the environment influence the evolution and ecology of vertebrates.

  • Chris Field

    Chris Field

    Melvin and Joan Lane Professor for Interdisciplinary Environmental Studies, Director, Woods Institute for the Environment, Professor of Earth System Science, of Biology and Senior Fellow at the Precourt Institute for Energy

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch
    My field is global ecology, and my research emphasizes ecological contributions across the range of Earth science disciplines. My colleagues and I develop diverse approaches to quantifying large-scale ecosystem processes, using satellites, atmospheric data, models, and census data, and explore global-scale patterns of vegetation-climate feedbacks, carbon cycle dynamics, primary production, forest management, and fire. At the ecosystem-scale, we conduct experiments on grassland responses to global change, which integrate approaches from molecular biology to remote sensing.

    Teaching
    I am one of five professors who teach the Earth Systems field studies course for advanced undergrads and co-terms at Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve. I also teach an introductory seminar on climate change for freshmen.

    Professional Activities
    Director, Department of Global Ecology, Carnegie Institution; Faculty Director, Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve; Professor, Department of Environmental Earth System Science, Stanford University; Senior Fellow, Woods Institute for the Environment, Stanford University; Senior Fellow, Precourt Institute for Energy, Stanford University; Melvin and Joan Lane Professor for Interdisciplinary Environmental Studies, Stanford University

  • Gordon Brown

    Gordon Brown

    Dorrell William Kirby Professor of Geology in the School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences and Professor of Photon Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsSurface and interface geochemistry; environmental fate of heavy metals; nanotechnology, applications of synchrotron radiation in geochemistry and mineralogy

  • Page Chamberlain

    Page Chamberlain

    Professor of Earth System Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch
    I use stable and radiogenic isotopes to understand Earth system history. These studies examine the link between climate, tectonics, biological, and surface processes. Projects include: 1) examining the terrestrial climate history of the Earth focusing on periods of time in the past that had CO 2-levels similar to the present and to future projections; and 2) addressing how the chemical weathering of the Earth's crust affects both the long- and short-term carbon cycle. Field areas for these studies are in the Cascades, Rocky Mountains, Sierra Nevada, the European Alps, Tibet and the Himalaya and the Southern Alps of New Zealand.

    Teaching
    I teach courses at the undergraduate and graduate level in isotope biogeochemistry, Earth system history, and the relationship between climate, surface processes and tectonics. I also teach a three-week field course each September in the Wind River Mountains of Wyoming for sophomores and GES majors. This course covers topics in environmental and geological sciences.

    Professional Activities
    Editor American Journal of Science; Co-Director Stanford Stable Isotope Biogeochemistry Laboratory (present);Chair, Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences (2004-07); Co-Director Stanford/USGS SHRIMP Ion microprobe facility (2001-04)

  • Rob Dunbar

    Rob Dunbar

    W.M. Keck Professor in the School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences and Senior Fellow, by courtesy, at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOcean processes, biogeochemistry, climatology/paleoclimatology, isotopic chemistry, ocean policy

  • Donald Lowe

    Donald Lowe

    Max Steineke Professor in Earth Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsClassic sedimentology, deep-water sedimentation mechanics and facies; Archean depositional systems and crustal development

  • Sally Benson

    Sally Benson

    Director, Precourt Institute for Energy and Professor of Energy Resources Engineering and Senior Fellow at the Precourt Institute for Energy

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research is focused on reducing the risks of climate change by developing energy supplies with low carbon emissions. Students and post-doctoral fellows in my research group work on carbon dioxide storage, energy systems analysis, and pathways for transitioning to a low-carbon energy system.

  • James Leckie

    James Leckie

    C.L. Peck, Class of 1906 Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor, by courtesy, of Geological Sciences

    BioLeckie investigates chemical pollutant behavior in natural aquatic systems and engineered processes, specifically the environmental aspects of surface and colloid chemistry and the geochemistry of trace elements. New research efforts are focused on the development of techniques and models for assessment of exposure of humans to toxic chemicals. Specific attention has been paid to the evaluation of exposure of young children to toxic chemicals. Other interests include technology transfer and the development of environmental science programs in developing nations.

  • Louis Durlofsky

    Louis Durlofsky

    Otto N. Miller Professor in Earth Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsGeneral reservoir simulation, optimization, reduced-order modeling, upscaling, flow in fractured systems, history matching, CO2 sequestration, energy systems optimization

  • Jef Caers

    Jef Caers

    Professor of Geological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research interest are varied, but a constant is the practical application of data science to address geological science questions as well as other areas of the Earth Sciences. My recent focus involves including physics into stochastic modeling and assessing uncertainty for decision making in geo-engineering applications.

  • George Hilley

    George Hilley

    Associate Professor of Geological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsActive tectonics, quantitative structural geology and geomorphology; Geographic Information Systems;unsaturated zone gas transport; landscape development;active deformation and mountain belt growth in central Asia, central Andes, and along the San Andreas Fault; integrated investigation of earthquake hazards.

  • James Holland Jones

    James Holland Jones

    Associate Professor of Earth System Science and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI am a biological anthropologist with primary research interests in evolutionary demography and life history theory. In addition these fundamental interests in the evolution of human life histories, I work at the intersection of disease ecology, the analysis of dynamical systems, and social network analysis. My work combines the formalisms of population biology, statistics, and social network analysis to address fundamental problems in biodemography, epidemiology, and human decision-making in variable environments.

  • Steven Gorelick

    Steven Gorelick

    Cyrus Fisher Tolman Professor in the School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch
    As a hydrogeologist, my research involves the study of water resources and water security with emphasis on groundwater. Using lab and field data, our aim is to develop an understanding of fundamental aspects of the transport of water and contaminants, and to investigate regional water resources systems. We have developed simulation-based planning tools to aid in sustainable agricultural and urban water management in the US, Mexico, India, and Jordan. With my colleagues, we have initiated the Global Freshwater Initiative, which studies water resources vulnerability problems throughout the world. During the past 14 years, our field investigations have focused on the interactions between groundwater and patterns of vegetation in studies of both meadow and salt-marsh ecohydrology. Scales of physical processes of interest extend from the domain of small pores to vast regional subsurface flow environments. Although driven by observations and data, we develop conceptual and quantitative models to rigorously understand physical processes, make predictions, and explore the impacts of new water management policies, such as taxes, quota, and markets. Such models enhance our understanding of groundwater flow behavior and provide the means to better manage water resources.

    Teaching
    I teach courses for graduate and undergraduate students involving principles and methods used in physical and contaminant hydrogeology. In addition, I run a seminar series that exposes students to a variety of multidisciplinary topics involving hydrology.

    Professional Activities
    2016 Fellow, American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS),
    2014 Best Paper in Environmental Research Letters in 2014 (Padowski and Gorelick, (2014), 2013 Editor's Choice Award, Water Resources Research for paper Srinivasan et al., (2012), Member, US National Academy of Engineering (2012), International Fellow, Institute for Environmental Science and Research (ESR) (2011), New Zealand, Fulbright Senior Scholar (2008-09); Chester C. Keisel Memorial Lecturer, University of Arizona (2008); Best Paper Award in Computers and Geosciences, International Association for Mathematical Geology (2006); fellow, John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation (2005); Stanford representative to the Consortium of Universities for Advancement of Hydrologic Sciences (2005-2008); M. King Hubbert Science Award, NGWA (2004); Ineson Distinguished Lecturer (1998); Fulbright Senior Scholar (1997); O.E. Meinzer Award, GSA (1994) James B. Macelwane medal, AGU (1990); Fellow, GSA (1988) and AGU (1990); Editorial Board, Optimization and Engineering Journal (1990-present); visiting professor, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Ecological Engineering Laboratory (2006); visiting professor, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, jointly at the Swiss Federal Institute for Environmental Science and Technology (2005); visiting scholar, University of Cambridge, Zoology (2007); visiting scientist, CSIRO, Perth, Australia (2009); Member AGU Water and Society Technical Committee (2011-present) visiting professor, University of Western Australia Centre for Ecohydrology (2012); visiting professor, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology ETH Zurich (2013).

  • Jonathan Payne

    Jonathan Payne

    Professor of Geological Sciences and, by courtesy, of Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy goal in research is to understand the interaction between environmental change and biological evolution using fossils and the sedimentary rock record. How does environmental change influence evolutionary and ecological processes? And conversely, how do evolutionary and ecological changes affect the physical environment? I work primarily on the marine fossil record over the past 550 million years.

  • Hamdi Tchelepi

    Hamdi Tchelepi

    Professor of Energy Resources Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCurrent research activities include: (1) modeling unstable miscible and immiscible flows in heterogeneous formations, (2) developing multiscale formulations and scalable linear/nonlinear solution algorithms for multiphase flow in large-scale subsurface systems, and (3) developing stochastic approaches for quantifying the uncertainty associated with predictions of subsurface flow performance.

  • Jonathan Stebbins

    Jonathan Stebbins

    Professor of Geological Sciences and, by courtesy, of Materials Science and Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly Interestsstructure and dynamics of crystalline, glassy, and molten inorganic materials and how these relate to geologically and technologically important properties and processes; solid state Nuclear Magnetic Resoance (NMR); mineralogy; igneous petrology; glass science

  • Wendy Mao

    Wendy Mao

    Associate Professor of Geological Sciences, of Photon Science and, by courtesy, of Geophysics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsUnderstanding the formation and evolution of planetary interiors; experimental mineral physics; materials in extreme environments.

  • Khalid Aziz

    Khalid Aziz

    Otto N. Miller Professor in the School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOptimization and reservoir Simulation.

  • Gerald M Mavko

    Gerald M Mavko

    Professor (Research) of Geophysics, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch
    I work to discover and understand the relationship between geophysical measurements and the rock and fluid properties that they sample in the Earth. My students and I have begun to understand the impact of rock type, porosity, pore fluids, temperature, and stress on seismic wave propagation and electromagnetic response. We are also working to quantify the links between geophysical measurements and the sedimentary and diagenetic processes that determine rock mineralogy and texture. Ultimately, this work allows us to better infer, from geophysical images, the composition and physical conditions at depth.

    Teaching
    I teach courses for graduate and undergraduate students on rock physics--the study of the physical properties of rocks and how they can be detected and mapped using seismic and electrical methods. This includes theory, laboratory measurements, and field data analysis. I also lead seminars in which students present and critique their ongoing research in rock physics.

    Professional Activities
    Associate chair, Department of Geophysics (2006-2008); distinguished lecturer, Society of Exploration Geophysicists (2006); honorary membership, Society of Exploration Geophysicists (2001); nominated for Reginald Fessenden Award, Society of Exploration Geophysicists (2000); School of Earth Sciences Excellence in Teaching Award (2000)

  • Gregory Beroza

    Gregory Beroza

    Wayne Loel Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsEarthquake seismology

  • Celine Scheidt

    Celine Scheidt

    Sr Research Engineer, Energy Resources Engineering

    BioCéline Scheidt has worked extensively in uncertainty modeling, sensitivity analysis, geostatistics and in the use of distance-based methods in reservoir modeling. She obtained her PhD at Strasbourg University and the IFP (France) in applied mathematics, with a focus on the use of experimental design and geostatistical methods to model response surfaces.

  • Rosamond Naylor

    Rosamond Naylor

    William Wrigley Professor, Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment and at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies and Professor, by courtesy, of Economics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch Activities:
    My research focuses on the environmental and equity dimensions of intensive food production systems, and the food security dimensions of low-input systems. I have been involved in a number of field-level research projects around the world and have published widely on issues related to climate impacts on agriculture, distributed irrigation systems for diversified cropping, nutrient use and loss in agriculture, biotechnology, aquaculture and livestock production, biofuels development, food price volatility, and food policy analysis.

    Teaching Activities:
    I teach courses on the world food economy, food and security, aquaculture science and policy, human society and environmental change, and food-water-health linkages. These courses are offered to graduate and undergraduate students through the departments of Earth System Science, Economics, History, and International Relations.

    Professional Activities:
    William Wrigley Professor of Earth Science (2015 - Present); Professor in Earth System Science (2009-present); Director, Stanford Center on Food Security and the Environment (2005-present); Associate Professor of Economics by courtesy (2000-present); William Wrigley Senior Fellow, Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies and the Woods Institute for the Environment (2007-2015); Trustee, The Nature Conservancy CA program (2012-present); Member of the Scientific Advisory Board for the Beijer Institute for Ecological Economics in Stockholm (2011-present), for the Aspen Global Change Institute (2011-present), and for the Aldo Leopold Leadership Program (2012-present); Aldo Leopold Leadership Fellow in Environmental Science and Public Policy (1999); Pew Fellow in Conservation and the Environment (1994). Associate Editor for the Journal on Food Security (2012-present). Editorial board member for Aquaculture-Environment Interactions (2009-present) and Global Food Security (2012-present).

  • Simon Klemperer

    Simon Klemperer

    Professor of Geophysics and, by courtesy, of Geological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI study the growth, tectonic evolution, and deformation of the continents. My research group undertakes field experiments in exemplary areas such as, currently, the Tibet plateau (formed by collision between Indian and Asia); the actively extending Basin-&-Range province of western North America (the Ruby Range Metamorphic Core Complex, NV, and the leaky transform beneath the Salton Trough, CA). We use active and passive seismic methods, electromagnetic recording, and all other available data!

  • Christopher Francis

    Christopher Francis

    Associate Professor of Earth System Science and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMicrobial cycling of carbon, nitrogen, and metals in the environment; molecular geomicrobiology; marine microbiology; microbial diversity

  • Anthony Kovscek

    Anthony Kovscek

    Keleen and Carlton Beal Professor of Petroleum Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch
    I am interested in the recovery of unconventional hydrocarbon resources and mitigating carbon emissions from fossil fuels via geological sequestration of greenhouse gases. My research group and I examine the physics of flow through porous media at length scales that vary from the pore to the laboratory to the reservoir. The organizing themes are flow imaging to delineate the mechanisms of multiphase flow (oil, water, and gas) in porous media and the synthesis of models from experimental, theoretical, and field data. In all of our work, physical observations, obtained mainly from laboratory and field measurements, are interwoven with theory.

    Teaching
    My teaching interests center broadly around education of students to meet the energy challenges that we will face this century. I teach undergraduate courses that examine the interplay of energy use and environmental issues including renewable energy resources and sustainability. At the graduate level, I offer classes on enhanced oil recovery and the thermodynamics of hydrocarbon mixtures.

    Professional Activities
    Member, American Geophysical Union (2006); Editorial Board, SPE Reservoir Evaluation and Engineering (2006-present); Society of Petroleum Engineers (SPE) Distinguished Achievement Award for Petroleum Engineering Faculty (2006); School of Earth Sciences Award for Excellence in Teaching (1998); Earth Systems Program Executive Committee (2002-present); Woods Institute for Environment Energy Committee (2005-present); SPE Continuing Education Committee (2000-present, chair 2004-05); steering committee chair, SPE Forum, Enhanced Oil Recovery: What's Next? (2005-06); Editorial Board of the Journal of Petroleum Technology (2004-present) and SPE Reservoir Engineering and Evaluation (2006-present); member, Society of Petroleum Engineers, American Geophysical Union, and the American Chemical Society.

  • Paul Segall

    Paul Segall

    Professor of Geophysics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch
    I study active earthquake and volcanic process through data collection, inversion, and theoretical modeling. Using techniques such as the Global Positioning System (GPS) and Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) my students and I are able to measure deformation in space and time and invert these data for the geometry of faults and magma chambers, and spatiotemporal variations in fault slip-rate and magma chamber dilation. We use these results to develop and test models of active plate boundaries such as the San Andreas, and the Cascade subduction zone, the nucleation of earthquakes, slow slip events, and the physics of magma migration leading to volcanic eruptions.

    Teaching
    I teach introductory undergraduate classes in natural hazards and the prediction of volcanic eruptions, as well as graduate level courses on modeling earthquake and volcano deformation and geophysical inverse theory.

    Professional Activities
    James B. Macelwane Medal, American Geophysical Union (1990); fellow, American Geophysical Union (1990); fellow, Geological Society of America (1997); president, Tectonophysics Section, AGU (2002-04); U.S.G.S. Science of Earthquakes Advisory Committee (2002-06); California Earthquake Prediction Evaluation Committee (2003-07); chair, Plate Boundary Observatory Steering Committee (2003-06); N.S.F. Panel, Instruments and Facilities Program (1997-2000); associate editor, Journal of Geophysical Research (1984-87). William Smith Lecturer, Geological Society of London (2011). Charles A. Whitten Medal, American Geophysical Union (2014), National Academy of Sciences (2016)

  • Jerry Harris

    Jerry Harris

    The Cecil H. and Ida M. Green Professor in Geophysics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsBiographical Information
    Jerry M. Harris is the Cecil and Ida Green Professor of Geophysics and Associate Dean for the Office of Multicultural Affairs. He joined Stanford in 1988 following 11 years in private industry. He served five years as Geophysics department chair, was the Founding Director of the Stanford Center for Computational Earth and Environmental Science (CEES), and co-launched Stanford's Global Climate and Energy Project (GCEP). Graduates from Jerry's research group, the Stanford Wave Physics Lab, work in private industry, government labs, and universities.

    Research
    My research interests address the physics and dynamics of seismic and electromagnetic waves in complex media. My approach to these problems includes theory, numerical simulation, laboratory methods, and the analysis of field data. My group, collectively known as the Stanford Wave Physics Laboratory, specializes on high frequency borehole methods and low frequency labratory methods. We apply this research to the characterization and monitoring of petroleum and CO2 storage reservoirs.

    Teaching
    I teach courses on waves phenomena for borehole geophysics and tomography. I recently introduced and co-taught a new course on computational geosciences.

    Professional Activities
    I was the First Vice President of the Society of Exploration Geophysicists in 2003-04, and have served as the Distinguished Lecturer for the SPE, SEG, and AAPG.

  • Atilla Aydin

    Atilla Aydin

    Professor (Research) of Geological and Environmental Sciences, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsFormation, geometric patterns and fluid flow properties of fractures and faults in a broad range of scales.

  • Tae Wook Kim

    Tae Wook Kim

    Phys Sci Res Assoc, Energy Resources Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch Field:
    Synthesis & characterization of thin inorganic/polymer membranes, adsorbents, and conductive
    membranes; Characterization of well-core & heavy oil; CO2 separation & sequestration process; Enhanced oil recovery method for offshore oil field; fuel cells system & hydrogen production.

  • Eric Dunham

    Eric Dunham

    Associate Professor of Geophysics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPhysics of natural hazards, specifically earthquakes, tsunamis, and volcanoes. Computational geophysics.

  • Martin Grove

    Martin Grove

    Professor (Research) of Geological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch
    I study the evolution of the Earth's crust by undertaking petrologic and geochemically-based research that is grounded with fieldwork. I co-direct the Stanford-USGS ion probe laboratory and develop geochronologic methods to constrain crystallization, metamorphic, and metasomatic histories of the middle to deep crust. Similarly, because heat flow characteristically attends mass transfer during crustal deformation, I employ 40Ar/39Ar and (U-Th)/He thermochronology to extract thermal history information from minerals to constrain the timing and magnitude of fault slip as well as erosional and tectonic denudation. Finally, I am heavily involved in provenance studies to constrain aspects of crustal deformation and erosion that are only preserved in the sedimentary record.

  • Katharine (Kate) Maher

    Katharine (Kate) Maher

    Associate Professor of Earth System Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch
    Chemical reactions between fluids and minerals create the environments that are uniquely characteristic of Earth’s surface. For example, chemical weathering reactions support the growth of soils and organisms and regulate the flow of elements to the oceans. The rates of these reactions also control the release and storage of natural and human-derived contaminants. Over geologic timescales, mineral-fluid reactions have helped to maintain a mostly habitable planet. Over human timescales, these reactions will regulate our ability to use Earth’s resources, such as soils, waters, and minerals.

    My research focuses on the rates of reactions in different environments using a combination of geochemical tools, including isotope geochemistry, geochemical and hydrologic modeling, and geochronology in order to address the following themes: (1) defining the controls on mineral-fluid reactions rates in the environment (2) finding new approaches to use mineral-fluid reactions to safely store carbon dioxide in the subsurface; and (3) development of isotopic approaches to study mineral-fluid reactions in the environments of Earth’s past. To support these research themes, I have constructed a new mass spectrometer and clean lab facility capable of high precision geochemical and isotopic measurements, and teach a number of classes and short courses on reactive transport.

    Teaching
    My teaching focuses on introducing students to the questions and major challenges in low-temperature and environmental geochemistry, and the application of isotope geochemistry to environmental and geologic problems. In order to introduce incoming students to Earth surface processes, materials and geochemistry, I am also teaching a freshman seminar on forensic geoscience. At the graduate level, I offer classes on isotope geochemistry and modeling of environmental transformations and mass transfer processes (i.e., subsurface reactive transport).

  • David Lobell

    David Lobell

    Professor of Earth System Science and Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute and the Woods Institute for the Environment

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe study the interactions between food production, food security, and the environment using a range of modern tools.

  • Noah Diffenbaugh

    Noah Diffenbaugh

    Professor of Earth System Science and Kimmelman Family Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Noah S. Diffenbaugh is an Editor of the peer-review journal Geophysical Research Letters, and a Lead Author for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). He is a recipient of the James R. Holton Award from the American Geophysical Union, a CAREER award from the National Science Foundation, and a Terman Fellowship from Stanford University. He has also been recognized as a Kavli Fellow by the U.S. National Academy of Sciences, and as a Google Science Communication Fellow.

  • David Pollard

    David Pollard

    The Barney and Estelle Morris Professor of Earth Sciences, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research aims to understand how faults and fractures initiate and evolve in Earth's brittle crust, how they affect the flow of molten rock, groundwater, and hydrocarbons, and the crucial role faults and fractures play in earthquake generation, folding of sedimentary strata, and volcanic eruption.

  • Eric Lambin

    Eric Lambin

    George and Setsuko Ishiyama Provostial Professor and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch
    My research is in the area of human-environment interactions in land systems. I develop integrated approaches to study land use change by linking remote sensing, GIS and socio-economic data. I aim at better understanding causes and impacts of changes in tropical forests, drylands, and farming systems. I currently focus on three related themes: land use transitions – i.e., the shift from deforestation (or land degradation) to reforestation (or land sparing for nature), – the influence of globalization on land use decisions, and the interactions between public and private governance aimed at promoting sustainable land use. My research is mostly focused on tropical regions in Africa, Asia and Latin America.

    Teaching
    I teach a course for graduate and undergraduate students on satellite remote sensing of land (Winter). In Spring, I co-teach a graduate-level course on Earth System Dynamics, including the human dimensions of global environmental changes.

    Professional Activities
    I was Chair of the international scientific project Land Use and Land Cover Change (IGBP/IHDP LUCC) from 1999 to 2005. I also contributed to the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment. I am often consulted by international organizations on issues related to tropical deforestation, desertification and the potential role of tropical forests in mitigating climate change. I am Foreign associate at the U.S. National Academy of Sciences. In addition to my research at Stanford, I am involved in several European research projects.

  • Tapan Mukerji

    Tapan Mukerji

    Associate Professor (Research) of Energy Resources Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy students and I use theoretical, computational, and statistical models, to discover and understand fundamental relations between geophysical data and subsurface properties, to quantify uncertainty in our geomodels, and to address value of information for decision making under uncertainty.

  • Leif Thomas

    Leif Thomas

    Associate Professor of Earth System Science and, by courtesy, of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPhysical oceanography; theory and numerical modeling of the ocean circulation; dynamics of ocean fronts and vortices; upper ocean processes; air-sea interaction.

  • Laura Bloomfield

    Laura Bloomfield

    MD Student, expected graduation Spring 2018
    Ph.D. Student in Environment and Resources
    MSTP Student

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsLaura studies how land-use changes facilitate interactions between people and wildlife affecting infectious disease emergence. She currently focuses on the spatial dispersion and transmission of zoonotic and vector-borne diseases along and between human and non-human primate networks.

  • Adam Brandt

    Adam Brandt

    Assistant Professor of Energy Resources Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsGreenhouse gas emissions, energy systems optimization, mathematical modeling of resource depletion, life cycle analysis

  • Margot Gerritsen

    Margot Gerritsen

    Senior Associate Dean for Educational Initiatives, Professor of Energy Resources Engineering and, by courtesy, of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch
    My work is about understanding and simulating complicated fluid flow problems. My research focuses on the design of highly accurate and efficient parallel computational methods to predict the performance of enhanced oil recovery methods. I'm particularly interested in gas injection and in-situ combustion processes. These recovery methods are extremely challenging to simulate because of the very strong nonlinearities in the governing equations. Outside petroleum engineering, I'm active in coastal ocean simulation with colleagues from the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, yacht research and pterosaur flight mechanics with colleagues from the Department of Mechanical and Aeronautical Engineering, and the design of search algorithms in collaboration with the Library of Congress and colleagues from the Institute of Computational and Mathematical Engineering.

    Teaching
    I teach courses in both energy related topics (reservoir simulation, energy, and the environment) in my department, and mathematics for engineers through the Institute of Computational and Mathematical Engineering (ICME). I also initiated two courses in professional development in our department (presentation skills and teaching assistant training), and a consulting course for graduate students in ICME, which offers expertise in computational methods to the Stanford community and selected industries.

    Professional Activities
    Senior Associate Dean, School of Earth, Energy and Environmental Sciences, Stanford (from 2015); Director, Institute for Computational and Mathematical Engineering, Stanford (from 2010); Stanford Fellow (2010-2012); Magne Espedal Professor II, Bergen University (2011-2014); Aldo Leopold Fellow (2009); Chair, SIAM Activity group in Geosciences (2007, present, reelected in 2009); Faculty Research Fellow, Clayman Institute (2008); Elected to Council of Society of Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM) (2007); organizing committee, 2008 Gordon Conference on Flow in Porous Media; producer, Smart Energy podcast channel; Director, Stanford Yacht Research; Co-director and founder, Stanford Center of Excellence for Computational Algorithms in Digital Stewardship; Editor, Journal of Small Craft Technology; Associate editor, Transport in Porous Media; Reviewer for various journals and organizations including SPE, DoE, NSF, Journal of Computational Physics, Journal of Scientific Computing, Transport in Porous Media, Computational Geosciences; member, SIAM, SPE, KIVI, AGU, and APS

  • Dennis Bird

    Dennis Bird

    Professor of Geological Sciences, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsTheoretical geochemistry of reactions among aqueous solutions and minerals in magma-hydrothermal systems; environmental geochemistry of toxic metals in the Mother Lode Gold region, CA, and the emergence of life in the aftermath of the Moon-forming impact, ca. 4.4Ga.

  • Mark Zoback

    Mark Zoback

    Benjamin M. Page Professor in Earth Sciences and Senior Fellow at the Precourt Institute for Energy

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch
    I conduct research on in situ stress, fault mechanics, and reservoir geomechanics with an emphasis on shale gas, tight gas and tight oil production, the feasibility of long-term geologic storage of CO2 and the occurrence of induced and triggered earthquakes. I was one of the principal investigators of the SAFOD project in which a scientific research well was successfully drilled through the San Andreas Fault at seismogenic depth. I am the author of a textbook entitled Reservoir Geomechanics published in 2007 by Cambridge University Press, now in its sixth printing. I served on the National Academy of Energy committee investigating the Deepwater Horizon accident and the Secretary of Energy’s committee on shale gas development and environmental protection. I currently serve on a Canadian Council of Academies panel investigating the same topic.

    Teaching
    I teach both undergraduate and graduate students. Reservoir Geomechanics is a graduate class for students in the departments of Geophysics, GES, and ERE, and Tectonophysics, a graduate class for students principally in Geophysics and GES. I co-teach a Freshman class entitled Sustainability and Collapse with Professor Ursula Heise of the English Department. I also help lead two graduate seminars each week and frequently attend and participate in other seminars.

    Professional Activities
    Member, Canadian Council of Academies Committee on Shale Gas Development (2012-2013); Member, Secretary of Energy Committee on Shale Gas Development (2011-2012); Member, NAE Committee Investigating Deepwater Horizon Accident (2010-2011); President, American Rock Mechanics Association (2011-2013); Member of Board of RPSEA (2010-); Chair, Scientific Earthquake Studies Advisory Group of USGS (2007-2011); Advisory Board, Department of Geosciences, University of Arizona (2008-2013); Chair, Stanford Faculty Senate (1999-2000); Chair, Department of Geophysics (1991-97); Chair, Science Advisory Group, ICDP (1999-2006); President, Tectonophysics Section, AGU (1988-89)

  • Aaron Cole

    Aaron Cole

    Director of Web Services, School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences - Administration/Finance

    Current Role at StanfordDirector of Web Services, School Of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences

  • Kenneth Sharp

    Kenneth Sharp

    Senior Web Developer, School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences - Administration/Finance

    Current Role at StanfordSenior Web Developer for Stanford School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences, Dean's Office, developing back end infrastructure for school, department, program, and research group web sites as well as special projects and whatnot.

  • Timothy Singer

    Timothy Singer

    MD Student, expected graduation Spring 2018
    Masters Student in Environment and Resources

    BioMD STUDENT WITH SCHOLARLY CONCENTRATION IN THE EMMETT INTERDISCIPLINARY PROGRAM FOR THE ENVIRONMENT AND RESOURCES, EXPECTED GRADUATION SPRING 2018

  • Staci Lewis

    Staci Lewis

    Ph.D. Student in Environment and Resources

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsStaci is interested in the impacts of land-use change on coral reef ecosystem services, and the transformation of governance regimes towards adaptive management of marine and coastal resources. Her work is based in the Republic of Palau, an island nation in Micronesia, where she is studying the emergence of watershed management and the sedimentation impacts on coral reefs in two watershed systems that have experienced modern increase in land development.

  • Hajin Kim

    Hajin Kim

    Ph.D. Student in Environment and Resources

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsHajin's research focuses on international trade and the environment.

  • Miles Traer

    Miles Traer

    Lecturer, Earth Systems Program

    BioMiles Traer received his B.A. in Geophysics from the University of California at Berkeley in 2005. After working at the Berkeley Seismological Laboratory, he moved to Stanford University and joined the Tectonic Geomorphology Group as a research assistant. Building on his research in the Tectonic Geomorphology Group, Miles received his Ph.D. in Geological and Environmental Sciences from Stanford University in 2014. While completing his Ph.D., he also co-created the Generation Anthropcene podcast with fellow Ph.D. student Michael Osborne, a project that told audio stories about the science of Earth's changing surface geology. Miles continues his research on the evolution of the ocean floor and currently works as a science communicator and multimedia producer for the School of Earth Sciences.

  • Jenny Suckale

    Jenny Suckale

    Assistant Professor of Geophysics and, by courtesy, of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    BioBefore joining Stanford in January 2014, I held a position as Lecturer in Applied Mathematics and as a Ziff Environmental Fellow at Harvard. I hold a PhD in Geophysics from MIT and a Master in Public Administration from the Harvard Kennedy School. Prior to joining graduate school, I worked as a scientific consultant for different international organizations aiming to reduce the impact of natural and environmental disasters in vulnerable communities.

    The goal of my research is to advance our basic understanding and predictive capabilities of complex multi-phase flows that are fundamental to Earth science. I pursue this goal by developing original computational methods customized for the problem at hand. The phenomena I explore range from the microscopic to the planetary scale and space a wide variety of geophysics systems such as volcanoes, glaciers, and magma oceans.

    I have taught both undergraduate and graduate courses in scientific, planetary evolution, and natural disasters. Since arriving at Stanford in January 2014, I have co-taught GES 118, Understanding Natural Hazards, Quantifying Risk, Increasing Resilience in Highly Urbanized Regions.

  • Jen Wang

    Jen Wang

    Ph.D. Student in Environment and Resources
    PhD Minor, Psychology
    Course Asst-Graduate, Graduate School of Business - Other Faculty
    Student Employee, Hume Center

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsJennifer's research interests address human behaviour change in the context of climate change, with the ultimate aim of shifting normative practices and paradigms within public policy, business, and individual behaviour to effectively account for the impacts and risks of climate change and environmental sustainability.

  • Sverre LeRoy

    Sverre LeRoy

    Ph.D. Student in Environmental Earth System Science
    Masters Student in Earth System Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI am a PhD candidate in the Dunbar lab group. For my research I apply principles of isotope geochemistry to sediment cores collected from fjords, a large terminal lake, and a large open basin lake in Southern Patagonia. Specifically, I am interested in reconstructing the westerly wind, precipitation, and temperature variability throughout the Holocene. In addition to paleo-reconstruction, I am working to better understand modern circulation and carbon cycling in these Southern Patagonian fjords.

  • Nora Nieminski

    Nora Nieminski

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Geological Sciences
    Ph.D. Student in Geological and Environmental Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI am currently working on small-scale process sedimentology and detrital geochronology of deep-water sediments in the Miocene thin-bedded turbidites of the East Coast Basin, New Zealand and the Upper Proterozoic Zerrissene Turbidite System, in the Damara Orogen, Namibia.

  • Danielle Touma

    Danielle Touma

    Ph.D. Student in Earth System Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsImpacts of climate change on global drought and precipitation

  • Clara Yoon

    Clara Yoon

    Ph.D. Student in Geophysics

    BioMy name is Clara Yoon, and I am a PhD candidate in earthquake seismology at Stanford University, advised by Prof. Greg Beroza and working closely with Prof. Bill Ellsworth.

    I have a unique, diverse combination of skills in geophysics, seismology, radar science, and software development that enables me to successfully approach interdisciplinary scientific problems and develop robust technical solutions.

    I am currently seeking employment as I expect to receive my PhD in geophysics from Stanford University in April 2018. I prefer to relocate to the Los Angeles area, although I am considering jobs anywhere in California.

    Please visit my professional website for more information about my research and skills: https://claraeyoon.wordpress.com

  • Biondo Biondi

    Biondo Biondi

    Professor of Geophysics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch
    My students and I devise new algorithms to improve the imaging of reflection seismic data. Images obtained from seismic data are the main source of information on the structural and stratigraphic complexities in Earth's subsurface. These images are constructed by processing seismic wavefields recorded at the surface of Earth and generated by either active-source experiments (reflection data), or by far-away earthquakes (teleseismic data). The high-resolution and fidelity of 3-D reflection-seismic images enables oil companies to drill with high accuracy for hydrocarbon reservoirs that are buried under two kilometers of water and up to 15 kilometers of sediments and hard rock. To achieve this technological feat, the recorded data must be processed employing advanced mathematical algorithms that harness the power of huge computational resources. To demonstrate the advantages of our new methods, we process 3D field data on our parallel cluster running several hundreds of processors.

    Teaching
    I teach a course on seismic imaging for graduate students in geophysics and in the other departments of the School of Earth Sciences. I run a research graduate seminar every quarter of the year. This year I will be teaching a one-day short course in 30 cities around the world as the SEG/EAGE Distinguished Instructor Short Course, the most important educational outreach program of these two societies.

    Professional Activities
    2007 SEG/EAGE Distinguished Instructor Short Course (2007); co-director, Stanford Exploration Project (1998-present); founding member, Editorial Board of SIAM Journal on Imaging Sciences (2007-present); member, SEG Research Committee (1996-present); chairman, SEG/EAGE Summer Research Workshop (2006)

  • Howard Zebker

    Howard Zebker

    Professor of Electrical Engineering and of Geophysics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch
    My students and I study the surfaces of Earth and planets using radar remote sensing methods. Our specialization is interferometric radar, or InSAR. InSAR is a technique to measure mm-scale surface deformation at fine resolution over wide areas, and much of our work follows from applying this technique to the study of earthquakes, volcanoes, and human-induced subsidence. We also address global environmental problems by tracking the movement of ice in the polar regions. whose ice mass balance affects sea level rise and global climate. We participate in NASA space missions such as Cassini, in which we now are examining the largest moon of Saturn, Titan, to try and deduce its composition and evolution. Our work includes experimental observation and modeling the measurements to best understand processes affecting the Earth and solar system. We use data acquired by spaceborne satellites and by large, ground-based radar telescopes to support our research.

    Teaching
    I teach courses related to remote sensing methods and applications, and how these methods can be used to study the world around us. At the undergraduate level, these include introductory remote sensing uses of the full electromagnetic spectrum to characterize Earth and planetary surfaces and atmospheres, and methods of digital image processing. I also teach a freshman and sophomore seminar course on natural hazards. At the graduate level, the courses are more specialized, including the math and physics of two-dimensional imaging systems, plus detailed ourses on imaging radar systems for geophysical applications.

    Professional Activities
    InSAR Review Board, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (2006-present); editorial board, IEEE Proceedings (2005-present); NRC Earth Science and Applications from Space Panel on Solid Earth Hazards, Resources, and Dynamics (2005-present); Chair, Western North America InSAR (WInSAR) Consortium (2004-06); organizing committee, NASA/NSF/USGS InSAR working group; International Union of Radioscience (URSI) Board of Experts for Medal Evaluations (2004-05); National Astronomy and Ionospheric Center, Arecibo Observatory, Visiting Committee, (2002-04; chair, 2003-04); NASA Alaska SAR Facility users working group (2000-present); associate editor, IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing (1998-present); fellow, IEEE (1998)

  • Julie Kennedy

    Julie Kennedy

    Professor (Teaching) of Earth System Science, Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch
    For the past 21 years I have been active in designing and running the school's interdisciplinary environmental science and policy undergraduate major, the Earth Systems Program. I have specific interest in interdisciplinary teaching and learning, and in the effective communication of complex interdisciplinary problem descriptions, analysis methods, and solutions to expert and non-expert audiences. I advise and work on research projects with undergraduate and master's level students whose interests include ecology, energy, land systems management, ocean science and policy, sustainability, environmental education, and science communication.

    Teaching
    I teach classes in interdisciplinary problem analysis and in critical reading and review of environmental literature. I also am one of a number of faculty who co-teach the Earth Systems gateway course, Introduction to Earth Systems.

    Professional Activities
    My professional activities center on undergraduate education. I have been active for decades on Stanford committees that examine standards and policies, the review of general education requirements, undergraduate advising programs, student mental health, and student diversity.

  • Richard Nevle

    Richard Nevle

    Lecturer, Earth Systems Program
    Deputy Director, Earth Systems Program, School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences - Earth Systems Program

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI study drivers of past climate change on millennial to million-year timescales using natural archives that preserve records of climate-related information. My most recent work has focused on the impacts of prehistoric human activities on the Earth's carbon cycle and the impacts of these activities on atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations.

  • Roland Horne

    Roland Horne

    Thomas Davies Barrow Professor in the School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences and Senior Fellow at the Precourt Institute for Energy

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWell Testing, Optimisation and Geothermal Reservoir Engineering

  • Keith Loague

    Keith Loague

    Professor of Geological Sciences, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsRESEARCH
    Efforts were focused on detailed field characterization and comprehensive physics-based numerical simulation; see PUBLICATIONS



    TEACHING
    Courses were focused on hydrologic processes & applied numerical modeling:

    @ Leland Stanford Junior University
    Environmental Problems (GES43Q), Environmental Earth Sciences I & II (GES130 & GES131), Soil Physics & Hydrology (GES130), Hydrologically-Driven Landscape Evolution (GES131), Geomorphology (GES140), Hydrogeology (GES230), Surface & Near-Surface Hydrologic Response (GES237, CEE260B), Soil Physics (GES238), Advanced Geomorphology (GES239), & Hydrogeology Seminar (GES332B)

    @ University of California - Berzerkeley
    Wildland Hydrology (FRM109), Soil Hydrology (SS150), Soil Science Seminar (SS235), Vadose Zone Modeling (SS250), & Hillslope Hydrology (SS251)

    @ University of Hawaii - Manoa
    Groundwater Geology (GG455), Groundwater Contamination (GG654), Groundwater Modeling (GG655), & Transport Modeling (GG656)



    SERVICE
    US ARMY, stationed (chronologically) @ Fort Knox (KY), Fort Eustis (VA), Hunter Army Airfield (GA), Vien Long Army Airfield (RVN), Can Tho Army Airfield (RVN), Bien Hoa Air Base (RVN), Fort Carson (CO), & Fort Benning (GA)

  • Norman Sleep

    Norman Sleep

    Professor of Geophysics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPhysics of large-scale processes in the Earth

  • Gail Mahood

    Gail Mahood

    Professor of Geological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsIgneous petrogenesis and magmatic evolution of silicic magmas and physical evolution of related volcanic centers and subjacent plutons, volcanic hazards in eastern California and western Saudi Arabia, geochronology, extension-related magmatism, geoarchaeology

  • Thomas Holzer

    Thomas Holzer

    Adjunct Professor, Geological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCurrently developing a methodology for regional probabilistic mapping of earthquake-induced liquefaction hazard. Involves geotechnical characterization of surficial geologic units. Prototype maps have been published for the San Francisco Bay area, including predictions of the response of East Bay sandy fills for repeats of the 1868 Hayward and 1906 San Francisco earthquakes. Also pursuing the relation between world population and the frequency of earthquakes with extremely large death tolls.

  • Phil Farrell

    Phil Farrell

    IT Operations Manager, School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences - Administration/Finance

    Current Role at StanfordOperational responsibility for computing and network infrastructure in the School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences.

  • Elizabeth Miller

    Elizabeth Miller

    Professor of Geological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsStructural geology and tectonics. Evolution and deformation of continental crust and its sedimentary cover, plate tectonics and continental deformation, geochronology and thermochronology. Current interests in the Cordillera, northern circum-Pacific, Russia and Arctic regions.