School of Engineering


Showing 1-7 of 7 Results

  • Kincho Law

    Kincho Law

    Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    BioLaw's research interest is in the application of advanced computing principles and techniques for structural engineering analysis and design. His research interests include computational mechanics, numerical methods, and analysis and simulation of large-scale systems using distributed workstations and high performance parallel computers. His work has also dealt with sensing, monitoring and control of structures as well as various aspects of computer-aided design, including application of information technology to facilitate regulatory compliance assistance, to facilitate analysis and design of building structures and to coordinate concurrent engineering design activities.

  • James Leckie

    James Leckie

    C.L. Peck, Class of 1906 Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor, by courtesy, of Geological Sciences

    BioLeckie investigates chemical pollutant behavior in natural aquatic systems and engineered processes, specifically the environmental aspects of surface and colloid chemistry and the geochemistry of trace elements. New research efforts are focused on the development of techniques and models for assessment of exposure of humans to toxic chemicals. Specific attention has been paid to the evaluation of exposure of young children to toxic chemicals. Other interests include technology transfer and the development of environmental science programs in developing nations.

  • Michael Lepech

    Michael Lepech

    Associate Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    BioProfessor Lepech's research focuses on the integration of sustainability indicators into engineering design, ranging from materials design, structural design, system design, to operations management. Such sustainability indicators include a comprehensive set of environmental, economic, and social costs. Recently his research has focused on the design of sustainable high performance fiber-reinforced cementitious composites (HPFRCCs) and fiber-reinforced polymers (FRPs), the impacts of sustainable materials on building and infrastructure design and operation, and the development of new life cycle assessment (LCA) applications for building systems, transportation systems, water systems, consumer products. Along with this he is studying the effects that slowly diffusing sustainable civil engineering innovations, and the social networks they diffuse through, can have on achieving long term sustainability goals.

  • Raymond Levitt

    Raymond Levitt

    Kumagai Professor in the School of Engineering, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Levitt founded and directs Stanford’s Global Projects Center (GPC), which conducts research, education and outreach to enhance financing, governance and sustainability of global building and infrastructure projects. Dr. Levitt's research focuses on developing enhanced governance of infrastructure projects procured via Public-Private Partnerships (PPP) delivery, and alternative project delivery approaches for complex buildings like full-service hospitals or data centers.

  • Christian Linder

    Christian Linder

    Associate Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    BioChristian Linder is an Associate Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and, by courtesy, of Mechanical Engineering. In his research he advances modeling aspects, numerical algorithms, and visualization tools to improve the performance and reliability of simulations to (i) understand physical mechanisms in materials, (ii) create innovative sustainable building materials and structures, and (iii) enable upscaled devices and engineered systems of the environment. In-house (iv) computational method development in the area of Computational Mechanics and Computational Materials Science constitutes the foundation of our research.

    Dr. Linder received his Ph.D. in Civil and Environmental Engineering from UC Berkeley, an MA in Mathematics from UC Berkeley, an M.Sc. in Computational Mechanics from the University of Stuttgart, and a Dipl.-Ing. degree in Civil Engineering from TU Graz. Before joining Stanford in 2013 he was a Junior-Professor of Micromechanics of Materials at the Applied Mechanics Institute of Stuttgart University where he also obtained his Habilitation in Mechanics. Notable honors include a Fulbright scholarship, the 2013 Richard-von-Mises Prize, the 2016 ICCM International Computational Method Young Investigator Award, the 2016 NSF CAREER Award, and the 2019 Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE).

  • Richard Luthy

    Richard Luthy

    Silas H. Palmer Professor of Civil Engineering

    BioRichard G. Luthy is the Silas H. Palmer Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering. He is the Director of the NSF Engineering Research Center for Re-inventing the Nation’s Urban Water Infrastructure (ReNUWIt), a four-university consortium that seeks more sustainable solutions to urban water challenges in the arid west.

    His area of teaching and research is environmental engineering and water quality with applications to water reuse, stormwater use, and systems-level analysis of our urban water challenges. His research addresses management of persistent organic contaminants and contaminants of emerging concern in natural systems that are engineered to improve water quality and protect the environment and human health.

    Professor Luthy is a past chair of the National Research Council's Water Science and Technology Board and a former President of the Association of Environmental Engineering and Science Professors. He chaired the NRC's Committee on the Beneficial Use of Stormwater and Graywater. He is a registered professional engineer, a board certified environmental engineer, and a member of the National Academy of Engineering.