School of Engineering


Showing 1-7 of 7 Results

  • Kincho Law

    Kincho Law

    Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    BioLaw's research interest is in the application of advanced computing principles and techniques for structural engineering analysis and design. His research interests include computational mechanics, numerical methods, and analysis and simulation of large-scale systems using distributed workstations and high performance parallel computers. His work has also dealt with sensing, monitoring and control of structures as well as various aspects of computer-aided design, including application of information technology to facilitate regulatory compliance assistance, to facilitate analysis and design of building structures and to coordinate concurrent engineering design activities.

  • James Leckie

    James Leckie

    C.L. Peck, Class of 1906 Professor in the School of Engineering, Emeritus

    BioLeckie investigates chemical pollutant behavior in natural aquatic systems and engineered processes, specifically the environmental aspects of surface and colloid chemistry and the geochemistry of trace elements. New research efforts are focused on the development of techniques and models for assessment of exposure of humans to toxic chemicals. Specific attention has been paid to the evaluation of exposure of young children to toxic chemicals. Other interests include technology transfer and the development of environmental science programs in developing nations.

  • Michael Lepech

    Michael Lepech

    Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    BioUnsustainable energy and material consumption, waste production, and emissions are some of today’s most pressing global concerns. To address these concerns, civil engineers are now designing facilities that, for example, passively generate power, reuse waste, and are carbon neutral. These designs are based foremost on longstanding engineering theory. Yet woven within this basic knowledge must be new science and new technologies, which advance the field of civil engineering to the forefront of sustainability-focused design.

    My research develops fundamental engineering design concepts, models, and tools that are tightly integrated with quantitative sustainability assessment and service life modeling across length scales, from material scales to system scales, and throughout the early design, project engineering, construction, and operation life cycle phases of constructed facilities. My research follows the Sustainable Integrated Materials, Structures, Systems (SIMSS) framework. SIMSS is a tool to guide the multi-scale design of sustainable built environments, including multi-physics modeling informed by infrastructure sensing data and computational learning and feedback algorithms to support advanced digital-twinning of engineered systems. Thus, my research applies SIMMS through two complementary research thrusts; (1) developing high-fidelity quantitative sustainability assessment methods that enable civil engineers to quickly and probabilistically measure sustainability indicators, and (2) creating multi-scale, fundamental engineering tools that integrate with sustainability assessment and facilitate setting and meeting sustainability targets throughout the life cycle of constructed facilities.

    Most recently, my research forms the foundation of the newly created Stanford Center at the Incheon Global Campus (SCIGC) in South Korea, a university-wide research center examining the potential for smart city technologies to enhance the sustainability of urban areas. Located in the smart city of Songdo, Incheon, South Korea, SCIGC is a unique global platform to (i) advance research on the multi-scale design, construction, and operation of sustainable built environments, (ii) demonstrate to cities worldwide the scalable opportunities for new urban technologies (e.g., dense urban sensing networks, dynamic traffic management, autonomous vehicles), and (iii) improve the sustainability and innovative capacity of increasingly smarter cities globally.

    With an engineering background in civil and environmental engineering and material science (BSE, MSE, PhD), and business training in strategy and finance (MBA), I continue to explore to the intersection of entrepreneurship education, innovation capital training, and the potential of startups to more rapidly transfer and scale technologies to solve some of the world's most challenging problems.

  • Raymond Levitt

    Raymond Levitt

    Kumagai Professor in the School of Engineering, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Levitt founded and directs Stanford’s Global Projects Center (GPC), which conducts research, education and outreach to enhance financing, governance and sustainability of global building and infrastructure projects. Dr. Levitt's research focuses on developing enhanced governance of infrastructure projects procured via Public-Private Partnerships (PPP) delivery, and alternative project delivery approaches for complex buildings like full-service hospitals or data centers.

  • Christian Linder

    Christian Linder

    Associate Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    BioChristian Linder is an Associate Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and, by courtesy, of Mechanical Engineering. Through the development of novel and efficient in-house computational methods based on a sound mathematical foundation, the research goal of the Computational Mechanics of Materials (CM2) Lab at Stanford University, led by Dr. Linder, is to understand micromechanically originated multi-scale and multi-physics mechanisms in solid materials undergoing large deformations and fracture. Applications include sustainable energy storage materials, flexible electronics, and granular materials.

    Dr. Linder received his Ph.D. in Civil and Environmental Engineering from UC Berkeley, an MA in Mathematics from UC Berkeley, an M.Sc. in Computational Mechanics from the University of Stuttgart, and a Dipl.-Ing. degree in Civil Engineering from TU Graz. Before joining Stanford in 2013 he was a Junior-Professor of Micromechanics of Materials at the Applied Mechanics Institute of Stuttgart University where he also obtained his Habilitation in Mechanics. Notable honors include a Fulbright scholarship, the 2013 Richard-von-Mises Prize, the 2016 ICCM International Computational Method Young Investigator Award, the 2016 NSF CAREER Award, and the 2019 Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE).

  • Richard Luthy

    Richard Luthy

    Silas H. Palmer Professor of Civil Engineering and Professor, by courtesy, of Oceans

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDick Luthy studies sustainable solutions to urban water supplies and management of contaminated sediments. Current work includes experimentation and systems-level analysis of innovative, decentralized water reuse and management of urban stormwater for water supply. He is working with a group to assess strategies for coping with reduced water imports and requirements from the State's Water Board to leave more water in California rivers for ecosystems.