School of Engineering


Showing 41-50 of 53 Results

  • Reginald Mitchell

    Reginald Mitchell

    Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Emeritus

    BioProfessor Mitchell's primary area of research is concerned with characterizing the physical and chemical processes that occur during the combustion and gasification of pulverized coal and biomass. Coals of interest range in rank from lignite to bituminous and biomass materials include yard waste, field and seed crop residues, lumber mill waste, fruit and nut crop residues, and municipal solid waste. Experimental and modeling studies are concerned with char reactivity to oxygen, carbon dioxide and steam, carbon deactivation during conversion, and char particle surface area evolution and mode of conversion during mass loss.

    Mitchell’s most recent research has been focused on topics that will enable the development of coal and biomass conversion technologies that facilitate CO2 capture. Recent studies have involved characterizing coal and biomass conversion rates in supercritical water environments, acquiring the understanding needed to develop chemical looping combustion technology for applications to coals and biomass materials, and developing fuel cells that use coal or biomass as the fuel source. Studies concerned with characterizing coal/biomass blends during combustion and gasification processes are also underway.

    Professor Mitchell retired from Stanford University in July 2020, after having served over 29 years as a professor in the Mechanical Engineering Department.

  • Paul Mitiguy

    Paul Mitiguy

    Lecturer

    BioFrom Milton MA and LaSalette, Paul did his undergraduate work at Tufts University and his mechanical engineering graduate work (Ph.D) at Stanford under Thomas Kane.

    As a young adult, Paul worked summers landscaping, farming, and construction, then worked at MIT Lincoln Laboratory, NASA Ames, and MSC.Software, was a consulting editor for McGraw-Hill (mechanics), and has been a consultant for the software, robotics, biotechnology, energy, automotive, and mechanical/aerospace industries.

    He developed force/motion software used by more than 12 million people worldwide and translated into 11 spoken languages. These software applications include Interactive Physics, Working Model 2D/3D, MSC.visualNastran 4D (now SimWise), NIH Simbody/OpenSim, and the symbolic manipulators Autolev/MotionGenesis.

    Paul currently works on Drake, open-source software developed by TRI (Toyota Research Institute) to simulate robots and autonomous vehicles. In his role as Lead TRI/Stanford Liaison for SAIL (Toyota's Center for AI Research at Stanford), he facilitates research between TRI and Stanford.

    At Stanford, Paul greatly enjoys working with students and teaches mechanics (physics/engineering), controls/vibrations, and advanced dynamics & computation/simulation. He has written several books on dynamics, computation, and control (broadly adopted by universities and professionals).

    Paul is highly appreciative of support from Stanford alumni/CEO Dave Baszucki who developed internationally acclaimed physics, engineering, and gaming/educational software, including Interactive Physics, Working Model, MSC.visualNastran, and Roblox.

    He is very grateful to students, co-instructors (TAs), faculty, and staff.

  • Parviz Moin

    Parviz Moin

    Franklin P. and Caroline M. Johnson Professor in the School of Engineering
    On Partial Leave from 10/01/2023 To 06/30/2024

    BioMoin is the founding director of the Center for Turbulence Research. Established in 1987 as a research consortium between NASA and Stanford, Center for Turbulence Research is devoted to fundamental studies of turbulent flows. Center of Turbulence Research is widely recognized as the international focal point for turbulence research, attracting diverse groups of researchers from engineering, mathematics and physics. He was the founding director of the Institute for Computational and Mathematical Engineering at Stanford.

    Professor Moin pioneered the use of direct and Large Eddy Simulation techniques for the study of turbulence physics, control and modelling concepts and has written widely on the structure of turbulent shear flows. His current interests include: Computational physics, Physics and control of turbulent boundary layers, hypersonic flows, propulsion, flow control, large eddy simulation for aerospace applications and aircraft icing.